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WALTON ADVERTISER 

— NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER — 
Devoted To the Interest of Boone, Kenton, Gallatin and Grant Counties— Kenton-CampbeU .Courier Consolidated With the Advertiser 



Subscription $1.50 Per Year In Adva 



nee 



Farm and Home- 
Convention To Be 
Held Jan. 25-28th 



WALTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, January s, 1944 




C 



The Annual Farm and Home 
Convention will be held at the 
Experiment Station, Lexington on 
January 25, 26, 27, and 28th ac- 
cording to H. R. Forkner, County 
Agent. The Convention annually 
attracts a number of leading far- 
mers and farm women from the 
county. 

Speakers on the convention pro- 
gram include: Roy Hendrickson, 
Director of Food Distribution, on 
Food as a Weapon; Miss Florence 
Hall, of Washington, on Women's 
Part In Pood Production; Marvin 
Briggs, of Indiana, on Farm Co- 
operatives; Dr. W. Faith Williams, 
U. S. Dept. of Labor, When the 
Nations Get Together; I. Forest 
HUddleson, Mich. State College, 
Keeping Farm Animals Healthy; 
Miss Else Margrete RoeU, Nprway, 
on Life Under German Occupat- 
ion; A. H. Tandy, British Consul, 
on Food and Farming in Britain 
Today; Mrs. Chu Shih-Ming on 
China's part in the War; Miss 
Flora Dodson, returned missionary 
on Life in a Japannese Prision 
Camp; Miss Gertrude Lieken, 
Wilmington, Del. Postwar Pros- 
pects for Homemakers; J. B. Hut- 
son of Washington, on The Far- 
mer's Part in the War in* 1944. 

The County Agent's or Home 
Demonstration Agent's offices will 
have a limited number of the 
meeting programs. The. convention 
has for its purpose the bringing 
together of outstanding farm and 
home authorities to discuss with 
farm people timely and important 
problems. 

Mrs. Mary Howe has returned 
home from a visit with her daugh 
ter, Mr. and Mrs. Edwards Bohl 
and sons of Batesville, Ind. 



VOLUME 30— NUMBER 7 



Stanley L. McElroy Taking 
Preflight Training at San 
Antonio, Texas. 



San Antonio Aviation Cadet 
Center, Texas— In training at the 
preflight school of the San 
Antonio Aviation Cadet Center are 
39 from Kentucky, including 
Aviation Cadet Stanley L. Mc- 
Elroy from Walton, Ky. 

The future pilots receive nine 
weeks of instruction at the Center 
learning the fundamentals neces- 
sary for actual flight training in 
primary, basic and advanced 
schools. They are prepared 
physically and mentally to attain 
their common goal, the silver 
wings of Army Air Force pilots. 



Large Poultry 
Flock Makes 
Good Record 



Mrs. Laura Piner 

Mrs. Laura Piner, Crittenden, 
Ky. passed away at St. Elizabeth 
Hospital Friday, December 24th 
following a short illness. 

Funeral services were conduct- 
ed from Chambers and Grubbs 
funeral home at Walton with the 
Rev. Lloyd Robinson of Erlanger 
in charge. Burial was in Indepen- 
dence Cemetery. 

She is survived by one son, 
Olan Piner of Crittenden and 
three grand children. 



Tuberculosis Christinas Seal 
Quota Short of Goal — Not 
Too Late Yet To Buy Seals. 



According to a report Just re- 
leased by R. V. Lents, Exec. Sec'y. 
of the Boone County Tuberculosis 
Association, the Tuberculosis 
Christmas Seal sale in 36% short 
of the county quotal of $725. Mr. 
Lents stated that the quota could 
be reached by sending him your 
dollar now for the seals mailed. 

All schools are requested to 
make your reports immediately to 
Mr. Lents. Don't forget that it is 
not too late to send in your dollar 
for Christmas Seals. Put the 
county over the top. 



Walton Boy Undergoing "Boot" 
Training at Great Lakes. 

A new recruit at the U. S. Naval 
Training Station, Great Lakes, 
Illinois, is John Austin Snape, 18 
31 South Main Street, Walton 
Kentucky. 

Now undergoing 'boot' training 
he is being indoctrinated into 
Navy Life, and is being instructed 
in Seamanship, military drill, and 
naval procedure. Soon, he will be 
given series of aptitude tests to 
determine wheather he will be 
selected to attend one of the 
Navy's service schools, or will be 
assigned to active duty at sea. 

Upon completion of his recruit 
training, he will be granted a 
nine-day leave. 



John L. Jones 

John L. Jones of Bullittsville 
passed away at his home Satur- 
day, December 25th from an 
attack of influenza. 

Funeral services were conduct- 
ed from the home Tuesday at 2 p. 
m. with the Rev. J. W. Campbell 
in charge. Burial was in Peters- 
burg Cemetery. 

He is survived by his widow, 
Mrs. Zora Jones; one son, Bert 
Jones, and one grand daughter. 

Chambers and Grubbs were m 
charge of the funeral arrange- 
ments. 



Grant Maddox of Florence has 
the honor of having one of the 
largest and highest producing 
flocks in the county according to 
H. R. Forkner, county agent. Mad- 
dox started the year with 2150 
laying birds and finished the year 
ending October Jst with an aver- 
age of 1445 birds that average lay- 
ing 224.9 eggs per bird a county 
record for this size flock. 

The October record, the first 
month for the new poultry year 
rates equally good on the- above 
flock. The past October was a low 
production month for most farms. 
This flock averaging 2138 birds 
produced a total of 33,289 eggs or 
an average of 15,48 eggs per hen. 

The above record shows that 
good production can be secured 
provided good breeding stock and 
good poultry management is 
followed. Usually it is much more 
difficult to handle a large flock 
than it is a small flock. 

Many poultry flocks today are 
giving poor production because 
they are over crowded or are not 
culled close. From 3'<2 to four 
square feet floor space per bird 
should be allowed in the poultry 
lay house if maxium product- 
ion is to be secured. The poorly 
developed late birds seldom pay 
for their feed expecially when 
they over crowd the good birds. 



RATION REMINDER 



Gasoline — In 17 east coast 
states A-8 coupons are good 
through February 8. In states 
outside the east coast area A-9 
coupons are good through Jan- 
uary 21. 

Sugar — Stamp No. 29 in book 
four is good for 5 pounds 
through January 15. 

Shoes — Stamp No. 18 in book 
one is good for 1 pair. Stamp 
No. 1 or the Airplane sheet in 
book three is good for 1 pair. 

Fuel Oil — Period 2 coupons 
are good through February 7 in 
all areas except the south, 
where they are good through 
January 24. Period 3 coupons, 
now valid in the Middle West, 
South, East, p., I Far West, re- 
main good thrc-gh March 13 
in the Middle West, East, and 
Far West, and through Feb. 21 
in the South. 

Meats, Fats — Brown stamps 
R and S are good through 
January 29. Brown stamp T 
becomes good January 9. 

Processed Foods — Green 
stamps D, E, and F in book four 
are good through January 20. " 



THANKS TO BEAU BRUMELL 




The employees of the Walton 
Mfg. Co. wish to thank their 
employers, Weisbaum Bros, for a 
delightful Christmas Party given 
at the factory, Friday, Dec. 24th. 
At noon a bountiful luncheon of 
sandwiches, fruit, drinks, candy, 
and nuts was served. 

The festive touch was added by 
a beautifully decorated Xmas 
tiee. Each employee was presented 
a large dressed turkey with the 
compliments of Beau Brumell. 

We take this means of express- 
ing our sincere thanks to such 
generous and thoughtful employ- 
ers, the Weisbaum Brothers: 

Thelma Fisher, Ethel Winkle, 
Stella Gultridge, Grace Dearing, 
Evelyn Sizemore, Ethel Breeden, 
Hope Vest, Grace Hanks, Mabel 
Webster, Lucille Mershon, Mar- 
garet Stone, Zella Baker, Lillie 
Young, Belle Fisher, Verna Law- 
son, Lula Osborne,.. Mary Larly, 
Ruth Hall,. Jane Johnson, Flora 
Summey, Eva Carr, Finella Adams 
Georgia Mayhugh, Osa Coop, 
Loretta Phillips, May Burdine, 
Anna Frakes, Velma Fartner,, 
Willa Hartman, Evelyn Sizemore, 
and Ha Hie Ruber, Manager. 



Home Food 
Production 
Important 



OUR SERVICE WILL 

enable you to see quickly, 
accurately-effortlessly. 



DR. J. O. TYSON 

Optometrist 
OFFICES WITH 

MOTCH 

Optician — Jewelers 
613 MADISON AVE. COVINGTON, ICY. 

Established 1857 



Mrs. Wallace and Advertiser Staff 
Walton, Kentucky. 

Dear Folk; 

I received the Advertiser from 
you folk this week. Certainly was 
glad to get the news from the 
home town and surrounding 
territory. It means a lot when 
you're away from home. * 

I enjoy taking this Hospital 
Course very much and only wish 
more folk had the opportunity of 
taking this course, civilians and 
all. 

I wish to thank you from the 
depth of my heart for the paper. 
I certainly do enjoy it. Again 
thanks. Wishing you and all the 
folk in Walton a Happy New Year., 

Sincerely yours, 

N. E. Northcutt Jr. S 2-c 



Home Food Production will play 
a more important part with farm 
people in 1944 according to H. R. 
Forkner, County Agent and Mary 
Hood Gillaspie, Home Demon- 
stration Agent. Boone County 
Extension Association and Home- 
makers Club leaders will hold a 
series of meetings in the near 
future to plan ways and means of 
meeting both the economic and 
war time needs for increased home 
food production and more effic- 
ient uses ti homi. J.bduced foods. 

The 1944 educational program 
will include not only quantity pro- 
duction but greater varieties over 
longer periods of time, the more 
efficient canning, storing and pre- 
serving of these products and the 
more efficient and palatable uses 
of these products in the family 
diet. 

Farm families have made re- 
markable progress in home food in 
recent years. 1943 was a record 
home food production year. High- 
er quality foods were preserved 
for winter uses the past fall than 
ever before according to the; 



More Men Needed 
In United States 
Maritime Service 



Pointing out .that the long- 
awaited invasion of Western 
Europe will require the greatest 
fleet of merchant vessels ever 
assembled. Ensign J. c. Jahn, en 
rolling officer for the U. S. Mari 
time Service, 8th and Walnut 
Streets, Cincinnati, declared today 
that many more merchant sea- 
men must be trained within the 
next few months ,for the gigantic 
task of keeping the invasion 
army supplied. 

Ensign Jahn's office is recruit- 
ing physically fit men from Wk 
to 50 for training in the deck and 
engine departments, as hospital 
corpsmen, ship's clerks, radio 
operators, cooks, bakers and 
steward's mates. Increased enroll- 
ment quotas, have enabled the 
Cincinnati office to accept many 
more applications than has been 
the case in recent months. 

Men classified 4-F or those dis- 
charged for physical reasons for 
the armed forces cannot be 
accepted. Applicants are urged to 
report at once with two copies of 
their birth certificates and a 
release from the nearest office of 
the U. s. Employment Service. 




Lt. (J. G.) William D. Scroggin. 
U. S. N. R. Visits Old Friends 
At Verona While On Leave. 



Henry Ellis Burden 



Henry Ellis Burden, Walton 
business man and farmer passed 
away suddenly Tuesday 
December 28th 'from an 



of 



Homemakdr club reports. 



Mrs. Dora M. Kindred 

Services for Mrs. Dora M. Kin- 
dred, who died Monday, December 
27th at her home in Verona, Ky., 
after a lingering illness, was con- 
ducted Thursday, Dec. 30th at 2 
p. m. at the Tharp & Stith funeraj 
home, Florence. Burial was held 
in Hopeful Cemetery. 

Surviving are two sons, the Rev. 
W. S. Mitchell, Alexandria, Ky., 
and Russell Mitchell, Florence; 
her husband, G. K. Kindred; four 
brothers, M. M. Lucas, Bullitts- 
ville, Ky.; George Lucas, Verona, 
Ky.; James Lucas, Covington, and 
John Lucas, Cincinnati; three sis- 
ters, Mrs. Fannie Glacken, Lex- 
ington; Mrs-. Grace Points, Cin- 
cinnati, and Mrs. Sallie Underhill, 
Erlanger and five grandchildren. 



heart attack -at his place 
business on North Main St. 

Mr. Burden had been helping 
with the stripping of his tobacco 
on the farm near Kensington, in 
the evening when he started home 
he could not start the car so he 
and Mr. Rice started to walk home 
but found the walk was too much. 
A car was sent for him and he 
passed away shortly after reach- 
ing his home at the store. 

Funeral services- were held from 
the Chambers and Grubbs funeral 
home Friday, Dec. 31st at 11 a. m. 
with Rev. C. G. Dearing, pastor, of 
the Methodist Church in charge 
of the services. Burial was in the 
Cynthiana Cemetery. 

Mr. Burden is survived by his 
adopted daughter. Miss Daisy Hill 
with Whom he made his home and 
one sister of Cincinnati and many 
friends. 

Chambers and Grubbs 
charge of the arrangements, 



Lt. (J. G.) William D Scroggin, 
U. S. N. R. has been- in service 
since November 23, 1942 as- 
signed to Naval Officers Procure- 
ment, Chicago, 111. He is now 
assigned to the Pacific Theatre. 

Bill as he is known to his many 
friends is a graduate of Verona 
High School, he attended Univer- 
sity of Kentucky, graduated at 
Morehead Teachers College and 
took some post-graduate work at 
Columbia University. 

Since boyhood he has always 
been interested ip outdoor life and 
is an enthusiastic athelete, was 
head coach at Morehead for " a 
number of years and later held 
night.-fresponsible positions with C. C. C. 
acute in Kentucky and West Virginia. 



While Bill has no relatives here 
he stated that he could not resist 
the opportunity of spending a day 
or two on Old" Kentucky soil be- 
fore ..leaving for his recent as- 
signment with Uncle Sam. 

His many friends are proud of 
him and wish him well. 



had 



Real Estate News 



New Haven Homemakers' 



A very enjoyable meeting of the 
New Haven Homemakers' -was 
held at the home of Mrs. George 
Baker, December 21st. The meet- 
ing was called to order by the 
president, Mrs. Harry Moore. 
After the business meeting we 
were Ujyited to the dining room 
where we did ample justice to the 
delicious covered dish' luncheon. 
After lunch we drove oUt to New 
Haven and thoroughly enjoyed 
the program presented by the 
first six grades. We then returned 
to Mrs. Baker's for our Christmas 
party and exchange of gifts, under 
the direction of "" our • program 
chairman, Mrs. Walter Penning- 
ton after which we worked on the 
afghan we are making for the 
wounded soldiers. After the 
meeting we were entertained by 
G. W. Baker Jr. with two very 
pretty piano numbers. Our next 
meeting will be held on January 
18th. 



Farm Management 
Record Keeping 
Meeting Planned 



A farm management and farm 
record keeping meeting will be 
held at Burlington, Tuesday, Jan. 
11th according to H. R. Forkner, 
County Agent. Roy E. Proctor, 
field agent in farm management 
from the College pf Agriculture 
will lead the discussions at the 
meeting. 

The keeping of complete farm 
accounts, records and a farm 
organization to meet most effic- 
ient farm production problems are 
of most importance this year. 

The meeting will be divided into 
two parts. The morning program 
will be devoted to farm record 
keeping and analizlng the farm 
business operations. The after- 
noon program will be devoted to 
adjustment of farm operations in 
relation to the 1944 agricultural 
outlook. All farmers are Invited to 
attend the meeting. 



jf The Mutual Realty Company, 
Williamstown, Ky„ Forest S. 
Thompson, proprietor, reports the 
sale of 195 acres of highly improv- 
ed farm land located in the edge 
of Gallatin and Grant Counties, 
near Route 16 and Verona to R. 
P. (Pat) Coleman, Falmouth, Ky. 
This farm belonged to D. R. (Dud) 
Chapman, Zion Station, Ky., who 
lived on the farm. This is a fine 
tobacco and stock farm and most 
of it can be cultivated with a 
tractor. Mr! Coleman will place a 
tenant on hii new farm, as his 
immediate attention is required 
by the large Licking River bottom 
farm on which he lives. The price 
was app. $14,000.00. 

Also the sale of the 152 acre 
farm located near Mason to Mr. 
Arnold, who now lives near 
Crittenden on Dixie Highway in 
Kenon County. This farm was 
owned by Bill Fortner, who lives 
on it. Mr. Arnold will get possess- 
ion before March 1st, and will 
move to his new purchase. The 
price was $5,200.00. 



Mr. and Mrs. Carl Wishterman 
of Ft. Landerdale, Florida, for- 
mely of Independence are receiv- 
ing congrulations over the arrival 
of a daughter, bom Sunday, Dec. 
26th. The little one has been 
named Joy Juanita, they have two 
other children. 



Scott — Trapp 



\ 



Miss Wanda Scott and Mr. 
Lewis Trapp were united in 
marriage on Thursday, December 
16, 1943 at Walton, Ky. by the 
Rev. Geo. Caroland, pastor of the 
Walton Christian Church. 

Mrs,. Trapp is the only daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. John Scott of 
North Walton. Mr. Trapp is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Nick Trapp of 
the Green Road. 

They will make their home with 
Mr. Trapp's parents for the pre- 
sent time. 

TheV many friends wish for 
them a life of happiness, prosper- 
ity and success as they make the 
journey together. 



Park Hills Flyer Writes of 
Being "Tail-End Charlie" 
on Bombing Raid. 

It's a good thing Lieut. Mel- 
vin G. Dryer, of Park Hills, was 
serenely unaware that his B-26 
Marauder was the "tail-end 
Charlie" of a bombing mission 
group several months ago — or 
he might have been scared. 

Lieut. Dryer, who lives at 600 
S. Arlington road, told of his 
experience, the roughest of his 
40 missions, in a dispatch from 
a U. S. Army 12th Air Force 
bomber base, it was a flight over 
small railroad yards at "villa 
Literno, Itlay,%in August. 
"A Long Flight" 
"We were attacked by 75 ME 
109's and they really were mak- 
ing persistent, aggressive attacks-," 
Lieut. Djyer said. "My tail gunner 
called over the interphone to say 
he was out of ammunition. The 
fighters' 20-millimeter cannon 
shells kept flashing by the cockpit, 
and I kept thanking the Ldrd that 
there were fqur bombers behind 
us bearing the brunt of the attack. 
"The fight kept up more than 
half an hour. Finally the Ger- 
mans quit after 22 of their planes 
had been shot down. I called the 
gunners and asked how the four 
planes behind us had made out. 

"Oh, they were all -shot down 
right at the first, and we have 
been tail-end Chirlies all during 
the fight," was the answer I got. 
I'm glad I didn't know that while 
the bullets were whizzing around 
— it might have scared me.' ' 
Promoted Recently 
The Park Hills youth, a pilot, 
was promoted recently from sec- 
ond to first lieutenant. He is 25. 
Lieut. Dryer's 40 missions have 
carried him over Rome, Naples, 
and in support of both the Sicilian 
and Italian invasion fleets, 

Most of his missions wei 
flown in the medium bomber 
called "Flak Happy"— ao named, 
Lieut. Dryer said, /'because I 
think it had a magnet in it." 

Sence he went overseas in Sept. 
1942, Lieut Dryer has served in 
England as well as the Mediterr- 
anean theater. /He has been 
awarded the Air Medal with eight 
Oak Leaf clusters. — Ky. Post. 
Lieut. Dryer is the Nephew 
Mrs. Edna Stamler Combs 
Walton. 



Stanford Speaks 
At Local Farm 
Bureau Meeting 



J. E. Stanford, Executive Sec'y. 
of the Kentucky Farm Bureau 
Federation addressed members of 
the Boone County Organization at 
Burlington, on Monday afternoon 
of this week. He outlined the im- 
portant farm program being spon- 
sored by the State and American 
Farm Bureau Federations and 
stressed the importance of the 
County meeting its goal of 100 
members in 1944. 

Lloyd Siekman and C. Liston 
Hempfling were elected county 
delegates to the State Farm 
Bureau convention to be held at 
Louisville on January 12-14. 
Harold Crigler and J. C. Acree 
were elected alternate delegates. 

The Constitution and By-Laws 
of the County Organization calls 
for quarterly meetings to be held 
at Burlington on the first Mon- 
day of January, April, July and 
October. 

The secretary reported that 
Boone County had 58 paid mem- 
berships in 1943. All members pre- 
sent felt that Boone . County 
should exceed" the goal of 100 
members in 1944. All farmers in- 
terested in a strong county Farm 
Bureau in 1944 are urged to send 
their $5.00 membership to John E. 
Crigelr, Burlington, Secretary- 
Treasurer or to contact one of the 
officers, directors or members. 

Lloyd Siekman of Petersburg 
was re-elected president, Stanley 
D. S. Ranson.-.of Walton, Vice 
President and John E. Crigler, 
secretary-treasurer. Directors 
elected for two years, 1944 and 
1945 are: George Heil, Florence; 
Joseph A. Huey, Union; Walter W. 
King, Verona; Hubert E. White, 
Burlington; and S. D. S. Ranson, 
Walton. Directors elected for one 
year or 1944 are: J. D. Acree. 
Hamilton; C. L. Hempfling, Con- 
stance; John J. Klopp, Peters- 
burg, Chas. B. Beall, Hebron; and 
W. H, Presser, Grant. 



Robinson — Revard 



Paul A. Robinson, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Walter P. Robinson of 
South Walton and Miss Margaret 
Revard, accomplished daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Revard of 
Independence were united in 
marriage.. Dec. 24th, 6:30 p. m. at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
DeMoisey in N. Walton by Rev. 
R. F. DeMoisey. 

They were attended by Mary 
Lois Robinson, sister-in-law of 
the groom and Gene DeMoisey 
who was a college mate of both 
the bride and groom, all graduates 
of Eastern State Teachers College, 
Richmond, Ky. 

The grooms parents and a few 
close friends were present. 

The groom is a medical student 
in the.U. S. Army at Richmond, 
Va. The bride is a member of the 
facutly* of the Dixie Heights 
School. ) 

They expect to make their 
home in Richmond, Va. 

Best wishes' are extended to this 
-happy young couple. 



Jean "Fox" DeMoisey has re- 
turned to Lawrenceburg, Ky. 
where he is a member of the 
Faculty at the Kavenaugh High 
School after spending the holidays 
with his parents, Dr. and Mrs. R. 
F. DeMoisey. 



of 
Of 



Important Notice to 
Truck Owners. 



All truck owners who hold War 
Necessity Certificates, must apply 
for their gasoline in person for 
this quarter on or before January 
16, 1944. If you don't apply by this 
date you will have to be referred 
back to the Office * of Defense 
Transportation before you can get 
any gasoline. 



Application For 
Subsidy Payments 
Should Be Made 



The applications for the Dairy 
Feed Subsidy Payment for Nov- 
ember and December, 1943 should 
be made when all weight receipts 
-for milk, butterfat, cream and 
butter are received. 

The payment will be at the 
same rate as that paid for 
October. 

Some producers have not yet 
filed for their October Payment. 
It is permissible to include the 
October weights along with Nov- 
ember and December, and receive 
a combined pay for the three 
months, according to John K. 
Crigler, Secretary of the Boone 
County A. C. Association. 

All producers are ured to submit 
their weight receipts as soon as 
possible, as it Is doubtful it any 
weights will be received by the 
office from the Dairy Companies. 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



Thursday, January 6, 1944 




-^W 




Paging 
^atttci Clau£ 

\ Jane Corby 



McCLUR.1 SYNDICATE. -WNUFEATUR.ES 



TO YOUR 




Jan Payson Is given the lead In the 
Devon Arms floor show when Paul Har- 
ris, the hotel manager, finds oat that the 
itch William Anthony Deverest knows 
net; he thinks Deverest's Interest will 
bring patronage. But the show Is not a 
■nccess and Paul blames Jan because 
Deverest- did not bring his friends. Jan 
does not want to tell Paul what she 
thinks Is the truth— that she does not 
know Deverest — lor she thinks Deverest 
ll his own chauffeur, Tony Williams. He 
does not dare tell her the truth, for she 
has told him she hates Deverest because 
•I his wealth. Unknown to Jan, Deverest 
makes arrangements to pay for an oper- 
ation that may restore her Invalid lister, 
Dora, to health. 



CHAPTER V 

Jan stood mute as he went on: 
"The Devon -Arms must take good 
care of its most important guests!" 
He clapped his hands as a gesture 
to his housekeeper and her aides to 
follow him, and left the room. 

"I am going to find out what this 
all means!" thought Jan, a little 
later. She found Paul in his office 
■till looking pleased with himself. 

"I came to thank you again for 
the beautiful way you fixed up our 
rooms," Jan began. 

"Think nothing of it," said the 
manager. "We have been very hap- 
py to have you girls here, Jan, and 
we hope you have enjoyed your 
•tay as much as we have." 

"Goodness!" thought Jan, "that 
■ounds as if he expected us to be 
going soon." 

More bewildered than ever, she 
tried again. "I really don't know 
how to thank you, Mr. Harris, and 
I know Dora will be more than de- 
lighted. She thinks that apartment, 
you know, is absolutely the most 
beautiful place in the whole world." 

"Well"— Paul cleared his throat 
— "I am very glad to hear that- 
very glad. I hope both of you, 
Jan, will always keep a warm spot 
in your heart for the Devon Arms." 

That farewell note again! Jan de- 
cided on a sudden "attack. 

"Where does Mr. Deverest come 
In on this?" she inquired as casu- 
ally as if they had been discussing 
that gentleman just the moment 
before. 

"What a , bright little lady we 
are," said Paul, smiling. "Mr. Dev- 
erest bound me to secrecy." 

Instantly Jan knew that in order 
to find out anything at all she must 
pretend to have information she 
did not possess. 

"Of course there's no secret, real- 
ly, except in his own imagination." 

Paul looked relieved. He had 
wondered if he had not made a mis- 
take In rousing Jan's suspicions, but 
of course the girl knew what was 
actually at the bottom of it all. No 
girl smart enough to get herself en- 
gaged to a man like Tony Deverest 
could be really in the dark about 
his Christmas eve "surprise" for 
her. * 

"Well, since- you do know the 
facts," Paul told her, "I see no 
harm in giving you a hint that ought 
to make the surprise even more en- 
joyable for you. Mr. Deverest is 
planning to announce his engage- 
ment with a magnificent party here, 
at the Devon Arms, on Christmas 
eve. He is having the whole sup- 
per room made into a Christmas 
scene, with the biggest tree in town 
and all the trimmings. 

"You'd like a new dress for the 
party, wouldn't you, Jan? I know 
you haven't been getting enough 
money — due to unfortunate circum- 
stances — to splurge on a new party 
dress, so as a Christmas present I 
have arranged with Mary Eliza- 
beth Howard for an engagement 
dress for you, and she's expecting 
you to call tomorrow morning for a 
fitting appointment." 

"That's sweet of you, Paul," said 
Jan unsteadily. 

'1 ventured to hope that you 
would have dinner at my home," 
Brad Curtis said. "My mother is 
particularly anxious to meet you; 
I've talked about you two girls a 
lot." 

"Do you live with your mother?" 
■aid Jan, simply because she felt 
■he had to say something. Dr. Cur- 
tis was helping her into her wrap. 
"That's right. She's very old, 
hardly stirs out of the big top-heavy 
house in which she went housekeep- 
ing when she was first married. I 
live there because it pleases her, 
and because I like it myself." He 
■poke to the chauffeur. 

'Stop at the corner, Charles. I 
want to get some flowers." 

When he came back he handed 
Jan a transparent box containing a 
■pray of bittersweet berries, red 
and gold against evergreens. 

"How lovely with this dress!" 
Jan took out the unusual corsage 
and fastened it at her waist 

"Lovely with your eyes and 
hair," Brad said gravely. "More 
rod than your hair, less golden than 
your eyes." 

When the meal was over the old 
lady suggested coffee in the library 
for Jan and Brad. She never drank 
coffee herself, she explained, and 
would go to her own room at once. 
Jan waited until Brad had escort- 
ed his mother to her room and 
called her maid to make her com- 
fortable for the night. He returned 
to the dining room and drew Jan's 
arm through bis, and they went 
into the library. Here only one 
lamp had been switched on, and 
the light of a coal are behind the 
ban of an old-fashioned grata 
aaamed vary bright 



Brad rose and crossed the space 
that lay between them. "Come 
over here," he said, drawing her to 
her feet. 

"You belong here," Brad began 
again after a while. "You should 
have the things that I can give you. 

"I'm thirty-five years old and 
you're— twenty? That's fifteen years 
between us. Could you learn to 
love a man fifteen years older than 
yourself? Will you give me a 
chance to teach you to love me?" 

"Perhaps," said Brad gently, "I 
ought first to ask you, is there any- 
one else, Jan?" 

"No," whispered Jan. 
"For a little while I thought you 
and Tony — er— Williams — " 

"No," said Jan, firmly this time. 
"That didn't mean anything." 

"Then— you'll try to love me?" 

"Oh, Doctor Curtis, I do love 
you!" Impulsively Jan rose and 
threw her arms around his neck. 
He disengaged them after a mo- 
ment and held both her hands in 
his. * 

"That's not quite the way I 
meant," he told her softly. Then, 
"We'll leave it at that shall we? 
And now I'll take you home. I'm 
flying up to Vermont in the morn- 
ing; I've got a camp at a place 
called Moose River. 

"Brad, I do wish you a happy 
Christmas!" said Jan. 

It was December 23rd. Jan was 
expecting Tony to ring up any mo- 
ment now. With such an excuse as 
this Christmas eve party he would 
surely make an attempt to see her 
again! 

She was due at Mary Elizabeth 
Howard's at eleven this morning. 
She presented herself dutifully. 
Mary Elizabeth herself came in to 
supervise this last fitting as Jan did 
as they directed her before the big 




"That's not quite the way I 
meant," he told her softly. 

mirrors. She watched her image 
advance and retreat in their depths. 

"Turn again." Obedient to Mary 
Elizabeth's commands Jan moved 
this way and that, stood still at the 
turns, pacing slowly in a wide cir- 
cle around the beautiful modern sa- 
lon. 

"I will never, never wear this 
dress!" 

Jan had made her decision. Right 
here, with the fitting in progress. 
Up to now she had had no idea 
what she would do. As the time 
for the Deverest Christmas party 
drew near she bad seemed to be 
under a spell. 

When the fitting was finally over 
to Miss Howard's complimentary 
satisfaction, Jan went to see Dora. 

Jan lingered at the hospital with 
Dora as long as she could. Dora 
was looking forward to Christmas 
as a child might She wondered 
if that "nice Tony Williams" really 
meant to give her a present. "Oh, 
I'm sure be does!" Jan exclaimed. 
And she hoped that in spite of what 
had happened Tony would not for- 
get her little sister. 

"I'll bet that he's paging Santa 
Claus this minute," she told her 
with conviction. 

They had agreed that it would be 
best for Jan to bring over to the 
hospital all the wrapped-up pres- 
ents from the hotel. Jan would be 
very busy on Christmas eve with 
Mr. Deverest's party and would 
not have time to come to the hos- 
pital. Dora promised solemnly that 
she would not open a single pres- 
ent until Christmas day, and Jan 
listened, her heart a little heavy at 
the thought that Dora would have 
to spend this Christmas day alone. 

"Going away?" There was Mrs. 
Talbot coming out of her room just 
as Jan was passing her door. She 
would run into Mrs. Talbot thought 
Jan, annoyed. Not that it mat- 
tered at all, but there was no use 
in broadcasting things before you 
were ready. 

"No. I was just taking the kitten 



to see Dora." She couldn't think of 
anything better oh the spur of the 
moment. 

"Humph!" said Mrs. Talbot 

It was only after they had left 
the city far behind that Jan no- 
ticed how much snow was on the 
ground. Here, in the open coun- 
try that lay in increasingly long 
stretches between the small towns, 
snow had drifted on the fields and 
mountains. For a moment Jan's 
heart quailed at the thought of her 
destination, a wintry mountain re- 
gion that she had never seen. But 
Brad would be there, she told her- 
self resolutely. And Brad would 
be glad to see her. 

She would marry Brad as soon 
as he wished. Of that much she 
was certain. Beyond that she did 
not think at all. Brad wquld be 
able to tell her what to do about 
Dora; perhaps he would want her 
to live with them— the Curtis house 
was big enough. 

"Why, it's snowing!" Jan almost 
spoke aloud as she noticed that the 
landscape, which she bad scarcely 
seen for many miles, was blurred 
by 'a drifting veil of snowflakes. 

It had been dark outside the 
warm, lighted world within the bus, 
for a long while, it seemed to Jan, 
when they finally stopped in a fair- 
sized town. 

Paul Harris was often perturbed, 
but he was rarely upset. And of 
all the occasions when he was up- 
set, there had been few when he 
was as worried as he was at ten 
o'clock of the morning of Decem- 
ber twenty-fourth. The chamber- 
maid assigned to the rooms on Jan's 
floor had come straight to him— 
very properly, too — with a note she 
had found pinned to Jan's pillow. 
The bed had not been slept in, the 
maid reported. Paul read the note, 
holding it with fingers that quiv- 
ered slightly as be absorbed the 
contents. 

"To whom it may concern," he 
read, "don't worry about me. When 
I get back I'll explain everything. 
Jan Payson." 

Paul thanked the chambermaid 
and sent her on her way. Then he 
rang the Deverest residence, found 
out from the butler where Tony was 
likely to be at the moment and 
finally located him. 

'I'll be over," said Tony, hang- 
ing up while Paul was still speak- 
ing. 

The next half hour was a night- 
mare to PauL 

"No, I haven't any idea where 
she could have gone. No, I didn't 
say anything to hurt her feelings. 
That note there, Mr. Deverest was 
the first inkling I had that she 
wasn't here." 

"Maybe Dora knows where she 
went." 

"That's an idea," said Paul, 
brightening. "I'll go around to the 
hospital and ask her." 

"Don't frighten her," said Tony 
from the doorway. He was on his 
way upstairs to hunt for clues. 

"Frighten Dora!" exclaimed 
Paul. "Really, Mr. Deverest!" 

Tony meanwhile had reached the 
Payson apartment and had been 
admitted by the chambermaid. No, 
the girl told him in answer to his 
questions, she hadn't seen Miss Pay- 
son yesterday at alL She had done 
the rooms as usual and left Then 
when she came in again this morn 
ing, there was that note. Had he 
seen it? Tony had. He got rid of 
the maid and after staring help- 
lessly around, wondering where he 
could begin looking for some hint, 
he began pacing aimlessly up and 
down the sitting room. Then he 
became aware that someone was 



by DR. JAMB W. BARTON 



Released by Western Newspaper Union. 

BUSY PHYSICIANS 




Dr. Barton 



One of the ideas we had as boys 
at high school was that any boy 
with blackheads or pimples could not 
be as clean about his body as he 
should be. If he would wash his 
skin with soap and water, and per- 
haps use a skin brush, he would 
remove the blackheads from his 
"pores" and the skin oil would come 
out on the surface of the skin. To- 
day we know that having pimples 
and blackheads is not a matter of 
cleanliness, but is caused by gland 
changes in the body which interfere 
with the proper use of certaip kinds 
of foods, usually fats and starches. 
Fortunately, acne was not thought 
due to any lack of intelligence in 
these students with acne because 
their class standing was at least 
equal to that of the class average. 

In the army, in schools or other 

ntVnX. "•«"£. "nnPn'Tr^f ^institutions, patients suffering with 
standing in the open door of the* .„ oKloc , tho Ui%M u„ „„„, " K _ 



sitting room. He looked up. What 
a sour-faced old woman"! 

"Good morning," he said shortly. 

"Good morning," said the visitor, 
even more shortly. "Is Miss Pay- 
son in?" 

"No, Miss— Mrs.— I didn't catcb 
the name — " 

"I didn't give the name, but it's 
Mrs. Talbot if you're interested. I 
thought that girl was up to some- 
thing, the way she went sneaking 
down the hall with that cat! Maggie, 
the chambermaid, said she hadn't 
been home all night" 

Tony ignored the last. But what 
did she say about the cat? Here 
was what he was looking for! 

"That's rfghtr The kitten is 
gone," he said. "Where could she 
have been going with it?" 

"She said," Mrs. Talbot stressed 
the word to indicate her disbelief, 
"that she was taking the kitten to 
see Dora. Fine hospital that per- 
mits cats in a sick room!" 

"Excuse me," said Tony, leav- 
ing the room so quickly that Mrs. 
Talbot had all she could do to get 
out of his way. 

Tony reached the hospital just in 
time to meet Paul Harris coming 
down the corridor from Dora's 
room. 

"What did she say?" Tony asked 
breathlessly. 

"Nothing," said Paul, "except 
that Jan brought all ber presents 
over yesterday and put them away 
in a drawer to be opened on Christ- 
mas morning. She doesn't expect 
Jan today. She thinks she's get- 
ting ready for the party tonight and 
is too busy to come over here." 

"Mrs. Talbot says Jan had the 
kitten with her, and that she was 
taking it to Dora. Did you see it 
around the room anywhere?** 

(TO BE CONTINUED) 



Every civilian physician is and 
has been very busy for many 
months, and with hospital labora- 
tories also busy he often has had to 
wait some time for 
reports. 

In an endeavor to 
help his fellow phy- 
sicians, many of 
whom "are carrying 
a killing load," Dr. 
Walter C. Alvarex, 
Mayo Clinic, in the 
Journal of the Amer- 
ican Medical Asso- 
ciation, has some 
"diagnostic time- 
savers, for over- 
worked physicians." 
Among these "timesavers" are hints 
on recognizing functional illnesses. 
"Good signs of a neurosis are the 
inability of the patient to say what 
the main complaint is, a tendency 
to answer the physician's questions 
with statements that have nothing 
to do with these questions, to com- 
plain of little things, to break in and 
not let the physician finish a sen- 
tence, to keep consulting a long writ- 
ten list of symptoms, to tremble and 
weep as the story is told or tell the 
physician how to diagnose and treat 
the disease." 

There are certain symptoms that 
practically always mean a neurosis. 
Symptoms such as jitteriness, the 
fear of not being able to get a deep 
breath, fluttering or burning in the 
abdomen, oft repeated belching, dis- 
tress and bloating after eating or 
especially after drinking cold water 
or "pop," attacks of pain and sore- 
ness in lower abdomen, together 
with passage of mucus, distresses 
that come before breakfast, bloating 
that comes up during the day and 
disappears during the night without 
the passage of flatus (gas), and pains 
that persist even after several op- 
erations. 

Dr. Alvarez points out that there 
are some of us who almost from 
childhood have had one illness after 
another without any cause that can 
be found. These illnesses are head- 
ache, weak, eyes, indigestion, con- 
stipation, back-ache, sleeplessness 
and "aches and pains all over." 
"Poor nervous heredity and the con- 
tractor's having put in poor materi- 
als are usually the best explanation 
for these symptoms." 

Among the other "illnesses" men- 
tioned by Dr. Alvarez as being 
caused by lack of nervous balance 
are nervous breakdown, extreme fa- 
tigue, food allergy, migraine, stom 
ach and intestinal ulcer. 
• • • 

Scabies Parasite 
May Attack Anyone 



uJ7oZ d 1 sun day 

International II SCHOOL 

-•■ LESSON •■• 

By HABOLD L. LUNDQUIST, D. S. 

Of The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago. 

Beleaaed by Western Newspaper Union. 



Lesson for January 9 



Lesson subjects and Scripture texts se- 
lected and copyrighted by International 
CouncU of Religious Education: used by 
permission. 



scabies (the itch) have usually been 
considered of low intelligence despite 
the fact that there were so many ex- 
ceptions. 

In the British Lancet Drs. K. 
Mellanby, A. L. Northedge and C. 
Johnson report the results of their 
investigations as to the intelligence 
of several hundred patients suffering 
with scabies. Thoresults of this in- 
vestigation showed that men with 
scabies were mentally a normal sam- 
ple from the army. There was noth- 
ing to suggest that the group suffer- 
ing with scabies had a larger per- 
centage with low intelligence than 
those not afflicted with scabies. 

"There was no significant differ- 
ence in intelligence between men 
who reported themselves sick, those 
who were discovered during the reg- 
ular or routine physical inspections, 
those with a few parasites or those 
with or without infection following 
an attack of scabies." 

From the above we learn that the 
parasite, the itch mite, the female 
of which buries itself under the skin, 
giving the appearance of scratches, 
makes no special choice as to its 
victims. The itching is due to sub- 
stances given off by the parasites 
and their eggs. 

• « * 

QUESTION BOX 

Q.— What causes excessive sweat- 
ing of the bands? 

A.— Sweating of the hands is usual- 
ly a sign of nervousness or emotion- 
al disturbances. A single dose of 
X-ray* may correct condition for 
months. 

Q.— What is meant by crepitation? 

A.— Crepitation is that crackling 
noise yon hear when there are ad- 
hesions aboat a Joint. Also hear It 
bone is ant broken. Often 
It in old rheumatic conditions. 



JESUS BUST WITH HIS MINISTRY 
OF LOVE 

LESSON TEXT— Mark 1:32-45. 

GOLDEN TEXT— I must work the 
works of him that sent me. while It is 
day: the night cometh, when no man 
can work.— John 9:4. 

Jesus said that He "must work 
the works of him that sent him" 
(John 9:4). And so we find Him go- 
ing straightway about His Father's 
business. It is a good example He 
has set for us. 

What He did and how He did it 
will give us many lessons which we 
may apply to our service. We can- 
not do exactly what He did, but in 
His power we may do mighty works. 

We find our Lord doing four im- 
portant things — 

I. Healing (vv. 32-34). 

We will do well to include verses 
29-31 in our thinking, for there we 
find our Lord tenderly sharing the 
sorrow of the home of a friend. One 
can picture the anxious hush that 
hovered over the home as distressed 
relatives and friends sought to al- 
leviate the suffering of the one with 
a fever. They knew the possibility 
of a serious outcome of the illness. 
Many of us have gone through that 
dark valley. All at once there was 
new hope, and soon there was joy. 
Jesus had come and had brought 
healing. Many of us have also 
had that blessed experience. 

Christianity is not a selfish faith, 
if it follows its Lord. We see in 
verses 32 to 34 that all the city 
came to His door with the diseased 
and demon-possessed, and He healed 
them all. 

The account of the kindly and in- 
telligent care of the sick is written 
large on the pages of the history of 
the Christian church. We do not 
have His divine touch of immediate 
healing, but we may have His com- 
passion which served the multitude 
with tenderness and kindness. 

n. Praying (w. 35-37). 

The Son of God sought out a place 
and a time for prayer communion 
with His Father. How often we who 
profess to follow Him fail to pray 
at all. Certainly we need the grace 
and power that prayer can bring far 
more than Jesus did. But we say, 
we are so busy. So was He. We 
are tired. So was He. People will 
not let us alone. They also fol- 
lowed Him. We make excuses, but 
we have no real reasons for our un- 
fortunate delinquency. 

All men were seeking Him (v. 
37), but still He took the needed 
time to pray. It has been said that 
"if you are too busy to pray, you 
are busier than God ever intended 
you to be." 

When His disciples wanted Him, 
they had to look for Him in the 
place of prayer. Christian workers 
and pastors, do people find us there? 

m. Preaching (w. 38, 39). 

Jesus said, "Let us go . . .that 1 
may preach . . . for therefore came 
I forth." It bears repetition that 
while Jesus did many miracles (and 
not for a moment would we detract 
from their worth and glory), yet He 
repeatedly, by word and act empha- 
sized the importance of preaching. 

Foolish though it may seem to the 
natural man (I Cor. 1:18-25), preach- 
ing the gospel in the power of the 
Holy Spirit is how, as it has been 
through the centuries, God's chosen 
means of accomplishing His pur- 
pose. What a pity that churches 
and pastors are forsaking it for 
book reviews, dramas, social hours, 
forums, and what not! 

God give us a revival of great, 
humble, and fearless preaching of 
the Word! 

IV. Cleansing (w. 40-45). 

There is a sense in which the 
cleansing of the leper was another 
act of healing, but leprosy is such 
a striking type of sin that the inci- 
dent calls for special consideration. 

Leprosy is like sin in that it is a 
destructive malady that pursues its 
insidious way without revealing its 
true nature until it is far advanced. 
It renders a man unclean, loath- 
some to himself and dangerous to 
others. At least such it was in the 
days of our Lord. 

Was there then no hope for the 
leper? Yes; Jesus had come. The 
smitten man cried out "If thou 
wilt thou canst make ma clean." 
And Jesus said, "I will . . . and 
he was cleansed." 

So may the sinner be cleansed, 
for "whosoever shall call upon the 
name of the Lord shall be saved" 
(Rom. 10:13). He will not turn the 
vilest of men away, for Ha came 
"to seek and to save that which 
was lost" (Luke 19:10). 

There is another important lesson 
here. The man who was cleansed 
disobeyed the instructions of Jesus 
(▼. 44), with the result that the 
Lord's ministry in that place waa 
greatly limited. 

We should obey the commands of 
God without question, and without 
any deviation from them. Disobedi- 
ence, even though it be by reason 
of great joy and enthusiasm, results 
In. confusion. Our Lord knows ex- 
actly what should be done in a par- 
ticular place at a certain time. When 
He guides, we should conform — for 
our own good and His glory. 



PATTERNS 

SEWING CIRCLE 





8516 

• 1-17 

Has Personality. 

\17 HEN it comes to flattery and 

'"all out charm — it would be 

hard to exceed this gay, young 

frock! See how it whittles your 

waist to a mere nothing! 
• • • 

Pattern No. 8516 is in sizes 11, 12. 13, 
14, 15. 16 and 17. Size 13, with short 
sleeves, requires 3«/ t yards 39-inch ma- 
terial. 




Store glass jars of foods in dark 
places to preserve the color. 

• • • 

Bananas should be ripened at 

room temperature, not in the re- 
frigerator. 

• o • 

Tests show that cookies baked 
on glistening new tins required an 
oven 25 degrees hotter than those 
baked on darkened tips. 

• • • 

Keep your electrie cord away 
from heat and water. Do not run 
them under rugs or any place 
where they will get unnecessary 
wear or where people can trip 
over them. 



Has Shapely Midriff. 

\J\ AKE this frock with the shapo 

■*■ •* ly midriff for your favorite 

niece! It can be lovely in velvet 

or taffeta — as a party frock or it 

can be cute as an every-day frock, 

in calico! 

• • • 

Pattern No. 8507 is in sizes 3. 4, 8. S. 
7 and 8 years. Size 4 requires 1% yards 
35 or 39-inch material, 1% yards machine 
made pleating. 

Due to an unusually large demand and 
current war conditions, slightly more time 
is required in filling orders for a few of 
the most popular pattern numbers. 

Send your order to: 



SEWING CIRCLE PATTERN DEPT. 
510 South Wells St. Chicago 

Enclose 30 cents in coins for each 
pattern desired. 






' 










Just a drops Penetro^ 
Nose Drops in each 
nostril help you 
breathe freer almost 
instantly, so your 
head cola gets sir. 
Only 25c— 2%tlmeaa* 
much for 60c Caution: 
TJse only as directed. 
Penetro Nose Drops 



War Dogs Tagged 

Every army dog carries an iden- 
tification card— A tattoo mark on 
its left ear. 



TABASCO 

The snappiest seasoning known, and 
the world's most widely distributed 
food product I A dash of this piquant 
sauce gires a rare flavor to any food. 
TABASCO— the seasoning secret of 
master chefs for more than 75 years! 



MUNITIONS f™-KITCHEN$ 



GLYCERINE made from YOUR SALVAGED FAT 

GOES INTO THE MAKING OF EXPLOSIVES BUT 

DO YOU KNOW 




GLYCERINE (S USED IN 
SURGICAL DRESSINGS 
AND MANY ANTISEPTICS 



PROTECTIVE COVERIN6S 
FOR BATTIKH1RS. TANKS, 

rUNESGDNTArNGWCEPINE 




TrAE DEFENSE WORKER 
USES GLYCERINE IN 
' PRODUCTION 




mt**#9m 

INTO TU£ MIRACULOUS 
UFE-SAVINfr SULPUA DCU6S 
GOES GLYCERINE 




'■>' • \ ■■■■■'■ .'.-', USE 



sfJSJl 



Thursday, January 6, 1944 




V WALTON ADVERTISER 



T"*HESE gay aprons will come in 
* very handy for use at home, 
for a bazaar, or a surprise gift. 
Your piece bag is sure to have 
many odds and ends of ric rac 
braid and bias binding and bright 
scraps of material which will do 
for trimmings with a %-yard rem- 
nant of plain gingham or un- 
bleached muslin. 

The diagram gives cutting di- 
mensions for the skirt and shows 
how to shape the waistline. It is 




• OUR COMIC SECTION • 



PETER 
B. 

PEEVE 



• BLUE BANDS WITH 
■■» OBAN6E BIAS TAPE 



easy to add a straight bib if you 
like. Use wider belts, about 2*4 
inches finished, for the bibless type 
and cut the ties about four inches 
wide. These three aprons will give 
you ideas for any number of trim- 
mings. Be lavish with bright color. 
• • • 
NOTE— These aprons are from Mr*. 
Spears' BOOK 4 which also contains direc- 
tions for more than 30 other gifts and 
things to make for the home. Booklets 
are 15 cents. Address: 



MRS. RUTH WYETH SPEARS 

Bedford Hills New York 

Drawer 10 

Enclose 15 cents for Book No. 4. 

Ham* 

Address 




TtiFCHfflFUL CHERUB 

■— —— « 

I Hold my he-wl up 
pretty well 

AmorvJ my fellow- 
men 

But when I meet 
myself o-lone. 

I feel embfc.rre.33ed 
then. 



3 




WNU Features. 



CLASSIFIED 

DEPARTMENT 
ORANGES 



ORANGES, tree-ripened. Bushel S2.SO. 
Box $4.80. Cash and express collect. 
Pomona Nurseries, R2D, Dade City, _ 



CREMATION 



CREMATION ^ 



Two Creatures FouAd 
Themselves in Sam e Boat 

A man applied for a job as a 
keeper at the zoo. ^-""^ 

The vacancy had been filled, but 
there was an acute shortage of 
apes and, equipped with a skin, 
the man was engaged to imper- 
sonate one. 

This he did with great success, 
entering thoroughly into his part 
and becoming an adept on the 
trapeze. Unfortunately he over- 
did his gymnastics one day and 
hurtled through the air, to land 
in the lions' enclosure. 

"Help!" he yelled, as a fero- 
cious-looking lion approached him, 
growling ominously. 

"Shut up!" said the lion. "Do 
you want to get us both fired." 



CRANDMA AND COLDS' COUGHS 

che nibbed on medicated mutton suet 
—then covered with warm flannel. To- 
day, mother uses Fenetro, modern 
medication in a base containing old 
fashioned mutton suet Double action: 
inside, vapors soothe stuffy nose— out- 
side, warms like comforting plaster. For 
colds' muscle aches, demand Fenetro. 

Doughnuts As Invitations 

Doughnuts serve as wedding In- 
vitations in some parts of Mace- 
donia. Families of the bride and 
bridegroom have young boys dis- 
tribute doughnuts to the towns- 
people. 



Gas on Stomach 

'•'" " ' *~ ' -'-In sr rt ssfils iia u I ma 

When uses* stomach add causes painful soffocst- 
!2"K: "8* •"»■•«» •«« heartbornTaWisTneualE 
areseruie tha fastest-acting medieloaskBoWnte 
ffjwtomsuc rrtef-n^lc&s Hta tiSi. ITbTu-S 
i#fc•J!2.l , * 1, • t,T •• B «"-«»» "wings comfort I™ 

•^."a^ifaSgS^ tmk " rrton> °' bot * 



Densely Populated 

It is estimated that an acre of 
meadowland contains 15,000,000 in- 
sects. 



NOSE MUST DRAIN 

To Relieve Head Cold Miseries 
When head colds strike, help nose ' 

drajn.dear the way for freer breathing r . . . — . » - 
comfort with tOKDOTS M3AL JULY. At drutxuts. 




Gather Your Scrap; i( 
* Throw It at Hitler! 



HELP BUILD 
RESISTANCE 
TO COLDS/ 



Take good-tasting tonic 
many doctors recommend 

Catch cold easfly? Listless? Tire quickly? 
Help tone up your system! Take Scott's 
Emulsion— contains natural A and D 
Vitamins your diet may be lacking. It's 
, great I Buy today. All druggists. 



■% Try SCOTT S 
[i EMULSION 




BEQUEST GRANTED! 




Judge— You've been married over 
50 years. Why do you want a sepa- 
ration now? 

Husband— Enough is enough! 



Bad to the Last Drop 

Jones — What kind of liquor has our 
new neighbor got? 

MacTavish— Very bad. I stopped 
in last evening and he gave me a 
drink. It was so bad I almost didn't 
finish it 



Celling Going Up 

Customer— How much is this pork? 

Farmer— That's 80 cents a pound. 

Customer— Did you raise it your- 
self? 

Farmer— Yeah. It was only SS 
cents yesterday) 



: 3 1 R i u n J 1 j n 



School Due 
Teacher— Billy, name an Insect 
Billy-A fly. 

Teacher— Correct Now, Johnny, 
name another insect 
Johnny— Another fly! ^ 



Who? Me? 

Stranger— Taxi! I'm in a rush! 
Step on itl (Long pause while cab 
travels several blocks.) Hey, do you 
know where I want to go? 

Driver— No, but I'm going as fast 
as I can! 



Needs Irrigating? 

Mr. Jones— What's that terrible 
noise in the next house? 

Mrs. Jones— That's Mrs. Smith 
cultivating her voice. 

Mr. Jones— Cultivating! That's not 
cultivating, that's harrowing! 



Wifey— What kind of a bird do you 
think I ought to buy to go on this 
hat dear? 

Hubby— One with a small bill! 



Answer Yourself 
Johnny— Dad, what Is a genius? 
Dad— Ask your mother. She mar- 
ried one. 

Johnny— I didn't know Mom had 
been married twice! 



Sure Thing 

Joe— Til bet I can tell you the 
score of this game before It start*. 

Bill-Okay. It's a bet What will 
it be? 

Joe— Nothing to nothing, 
the game starts! 



Hardly New* 

Jones— Well, Johnny, your sister 
is going to marry met How's that 
for news? 

Johnny— Huh! Are you Just find- 
ing that out? 



There were several requisites for 
recipes which made today's column 
and I think you'll appreciate all of 
them. First, they must be easy on 
the budget, second, they must be 
easy on ration points; and third, 
they must be leftovers, but incog- 
nito! 

All three are particularly timely 
because you have probably splurged 
during the holi 




days and want to 
take it easy on 
points and the 
budget now; and 
third, you may 
have leftovers 
that want things 
done with them 
but still won't 
taste like left- 
overs because you know how the 
family sniffs at them. So, here we 
go, first of all with leftover pieces 
from that holiday bird. 

'Chicken Noodle Loaf. 

(Serves 8) 

H to 1 cup diced cooked chicken 

S eggs, well beaten 

% pound noodles 

t tablespoons butter or substitute 

t tablespoons flour 

2 cnps milk 

% teaspoon salt 

I cup soft bread crumbs 

1 teaspoon chopped onion 

1 tablespoon chopped parsley 

V* teaspoon pepper 
Cook noodles in boiling, salted wa- 
ter until tender (2 quarts water, 1 
teaspoon salt). Drain. Meanwhile, 
prepare white sauce of butter, flour 
and milk. Combine chicken, eggs, 
noodles, white sauce, crumbs and 
seasonings. Pour into a well-greased 
loaf pan 9 by 5 by 3 inches. Bake 
in a moderately slow (325-degree) 
oven until firm in center, about 1 
hour. Let stand for about 8 minutes 
after removal from oven, then loos- 
en around edges. Invert on hot plat- 
ter. Slice to serve. If desired, serve 
with cheese, mushroom or vegetable 
sauce. Garnish with pickled pears 
and spiced prunes. 

Are there remainders .of a veal 
roast still stand- 
ing in the refrig- 
erator? You can 
make a perfectly 
delicious chop 
suey from a few 
cupfuls of the — ssj 
roast meat. 

Veal Chop Suey. 
(Serves 6) 

I cups roast veal, cut in strips 

t sliced onions 

1 cup green pepper, cnt in strips 

4 tablespoons melted shortening 

1 teaspoon salt 

% teaspoon pepper 

t oops celery, cnt in strips 

t cups sliced radishes 

8 tablespoons cold water 

t tablespoons flour 

Hot cooked rice 

Cook veal, green pepper and on- 
ions in shortening, in a large skillet 
for about 10 minutes, stirring fre- 
quently. Add seasonings and celery. 
Cover and cook slowly for 5 minutes, 



Lynn Chambers' Point-Saving 
Menu 

•Chicken Noodle Loaf 

Glazed Carrots Spiced Prunes 

Waldorf Salad 

Baking Powder Biscuits 

Orange Custard 

Cookies Beverage 

•Recipe Given 





Lynn Says 



Point Pointers: When you run 
low on stamps for processed 
foods, be sure to find fresh ones 
to substitute. To extend a proc- 
essed food, use it with a fresh, 
seasonal food. 

Using foods that are grown near 
your own community helps the 
transportation problem, as well as 
your near-by grower. 

For children or invalids who 
use canned, pureed foods, extend 
by mixing with milk and cream. 
Use with purees of other vegeta- 
bles and fruits. 

Leftovers can be combined with 
other foods to use them up; for 
example, leftover beets can be 
mixed with onion, vinegar and 
spices for relish or salad; left- 
over corn may be combined with 
lima beans, carrots or peas. 
Save Used Fats! 



then stir in flour and water which 
have been blended to a smooth 
paste. Cook, covered, 5 minutes 
longer. Add radishes, Heat thor- 
oughly, and serve on hot cooked 
rice. 

Frankfurters are sometimes left 
over, too, and the problem of what 
to do with them after they've lost 
moisture and shriveled a bit can be 
easily solved if you do this with 
them: 

Rosy Rounds. 
(Serves 4 to 6) 

2 tablespoons fat 

% cup minced onion 

5 to 8 frankfurters, ground 

% teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 

Salt and pepper 

Biscuit dough 

1 cup medium white sauce 

1 teaspoon dry mustard 

Melt fat; add onion and frankfurt- 
ers. Cook until lightly browned, stir- 
ring often. Add Worcestershire 
sauce; season with salt and pepper. 

Prepare biscuit dough as follows: 
Sift together 2 cups flour, 8 tea- 
spoons baiting powder, M teaspoon 
salt; cut in % cup shortening; add 
% cup milk, mixing to a soft dough. 

Roll dough into rectangle % inch 
thick. Cover with meat mixture; 
roll up in jelly- 
roll fashion. Cut 
into 1% - inch 
slices; place in 
baking pan. Bake 
in a very hot oven 
(450 degrees) IS 
minutes. Combine 
white sauce and 

mustard; serve on hot biscuit rings. 
Both leftover meat and vegetables 
get used in this meat roll with chill 
seasoning: ' 

Chili Vegetable Meat RoU. 
(Serves 4 to 6) 

1 eup ground cooked meat 

I cup chopped cooked peas, car- 
rots or green beans 

H teaspoon chill powder 

1 teaspoon minced onion 

1 teaspoon minced green pepper 

2 cups meat gravy 
Salt and pepper 
Biscuit dough 

Combine meat vegetables, chili 
powder, onion, green pepper and 1 
cup gravy. Season with salt and 
pepper. Prepare biscuit dough. Roll 
in rectangle about % inch thick. 
Spread with meat mixture; roll up 
in jelly-roll fashion. Place on bak- 
ing sheet and bake in a hot oven 
(425 degrees) 30 minutes or until 
well browned. Slice 1% inches thick. 
Serve with remaining hot gravy. 

Tastiness plus describes this lima 
bean and leftover meat casserole to 
perfection. Serve it with a cabbage 
and apple salad, hot rolls, bever- 
age and jelly roll and you have a 
well-balanced and economical meal: 

Lima-Meat Casserole. 
(Serves 6 to S) 
2 slices bacon or salt pork, diced 
»H cups leftover beef, ground 
1 onion, diced 
S cups cooked tomatoes 
1 teaspoon salt 
1 teaspoon chill powder 
4 oups cooked lima beans (fresh 
or dried) 

Fry out bacon or salt pork. Add 
meat and onions. Brown slowly, stir- 
ring frequently. Add remaining In- 
gredients. Pour into a well-greased 
casserole. Cover. Bake In a mod- 
erate oven (350 degrees) for 80 min- 
utes. 

// you wow mgar-mving suggestion*, 
write to Lynn Chambers, Western Newt- 
paper Union, 210 South Desplaines 
Strtm, Chicago 6, Illinois. Don't for* 
get U> enclote m stamped, self-address*! 
mmtopsj for your reply. 
Released by Western Newspaper Union. 



Preserve. The Remain, of Your Loved Ones 

VISIT THE NEW NULSSK CettKL 

9:00 A. M. lo 4:00 r. M. 

Writs ftr Dssn-ipnee Booties 

CINCINNATI CREMATION CO. 



Wood Samples 

The largest collection of wood 
samples in the world is in the 
school of forestry of Yale univer- 
sity. It contains 40,750 specimens 
of 11,890 species of 2,800 genera 
of 232 families of trees; also 19,500 
microscopic slides. 



COLD SUFFERERS 

0H PROMPT-DECISIVE 

RELIEF! 



MlUlo»s rely on Grove's Cob! Tablet* 

a multiple medicine. Work on sal 
these usual cold symptoms at earn* 
Jim* . . . headache— body ache*-, 
fever—nasal stuffiness. Why lost put 
"P with this distress? Take Grove V 



» ty ' 
known to millions as famous "Broc 
Qm^aoa'-CoMTabletaT^ 
CareMoissy— Get Large Kconomy Sis* 



COLD TABLETS 



Underaged Soldiers 

The army, navy and marine 
corps have discovered, discharged 
and sent home, in the past three 
years, more than 6,000 patriotic 
but underage youths who had been 
able to enlist by misrepresenting 
the date of their birth. 



St.Joseph 

ASPIRIN 



>—— '"J6 TABLETS 20< 100 TABLETS Si 

Worlds largest seller at it> 



Dictionaries for Soldiers 

Phrase books and dictionaries 
for our soldiers overseas have 
been printed in 20 languages. 



/ 




lief At Last 
For Your Cough 

Creomulsion relieves promptly be- 
cause it goes right to the seat of the 
trouble to help loosen and expel 
germ laden phlegm, and aid nature 
to soothe and heal raw, tender, in- 
flamed bronchial mucous mem- 
branes. Tell your druggist to sell you 
• bottle of Creomulsion with the un- 
derstanding you must like the way it 
Quickly allays the cough or you an 
to have your money back. 

CREOMULSION 

for Coughs, Chest Colds, Bronchitis 



Invest in Liberty & 
"fr # Buy War Bonds 



WNU— E 



TbatNa^ir.<? 
Backache 



May Warn of Diaordared 

Kidney Action 

Modem life with Its hurry and worry, 
frrerulsr habits. Improper eati&f sad 
drlnklnr— its risk of exposure and lnt*c- 
tion— throws heavy strain on tha werk 
of the kidneys. They are apt to I 
over-taxed and (all to filter er 
and other Imparities from the I 
blood. 

beaa?che?*dLt3n*eaa, TettulJ «V at**. 

las pains. sweUlnt=-feeT eoasuSy 
tired, nervous, all worn oat. Other ataxes 
at kidney or bladder disorder are aoaee- 
ttmss burning, scanty or to* fiaiujaal 



aH 

s 

l__ 



Try Doaa's PiUs. Doom's help tha 
Moneys to pass aft harmful excess body 
waste. They have had mora than halt • 



Doans Pills 



!M<^ , wwffB#WitW#miB!!^M g ^™ fl | ^ ^ MH 






WALTON ADVERTISER 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 

(Established in 1014) 

THE BENTON -CAMPBELL COURIER — Established 1M7 

(Consolidated June 1, 1938) 



Entered as Second Class Matter January 1, 1916 
at the Post Office at Walton, Kentucky. 



MRS. J. R. WALLACE and WILLIAM W. JARRELL 
EDITORS and PUBLISHERS . 



Foreign Adverttsfca* Representative: 

AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 



IMTfONAL CDITDR1 AU 

B^i5kCASSOC\AT\Ofi 



Notices and Cards of Thanks: 
E5 words and less, 50 cents. Over 
BS words $1.00. 



MEMBER 

ENTUCKY PRES! 
ASSOCIATIOJJ/ 



MT. ZION 



Lieut, and Mrs. Wilbur Bing- 
ham of Camp Breckenridge, Ky. 
and Miss Ruth Bingham of Cov- 



ington spent Sunday with their 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Bing- 
ham and son. 

Tech. Sgt. Otto Johnson of 
Quantico, Va. and Mrs. Otto 



PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



Deposits Insured Under the Federal 
Deposit lusurance Corporation . . . 



PUBLIC SALE 

Having sold my farm on Dixie Highway, one mile 
South of Walton, Ky., I will sell on the above farm 
at Public Auction, on — 

FRIDAY, JAN. 14* 1944 

AT ONE O'CLOCK (EWT) 
£J?\ THE FOLLOWING: 

30,000 ft. of lumber, all kinds 2x4 ■ 2x6 - 2x10 etc. ; 
thirty-seven squares of galvanized siding, never 
been used; locust posts; 200 bu. white corn in crib; 
thirty shocks of good corn on Matthew Cleek Farm 
near Verona, Ky.; alfalfa hay and mixed hay; 40 
head of two and three year year old Ewes, these 
Ewes are home raised, also two 3-year old Rams. 

V. P. KERNS 

Tel. Florence 20 — Florence, Ky. 
LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



JANUARY 
CLEARANCE SALE 

4 FT. FLOCK FEEDERS, with stand ; $0. 79 

regular $3.29; reduced to L-. * — 

4 FT. FLOOR TYPE FLOCK FEEDERS; $1 .79 
regular $2.35; reduced to . 

TOBACCO CANVAS j 9 ft. wide, $7.25 

1 00 ft. long ;_ i ■ 

6-GALLON STONE $1.39 

JARS _.__. l 

4-GALLON STONE $1 .89 

CHURNS •_, ; l 

ELECTRIC FENCE $1 1 .95 
CONTROLLERS * l 

350 CHICK ELECTRIC $9^.50 

BROODERS „ :.... J*£* 

SUPER HATCH INCUBATORS, $9fi-50 
400-EGG L . . *** 

SHEEP MINERAL BLOCKS, $1 .53 

25 lbs: : * 

A & D FEEDING OIL ; $1 .98 

GALLON £ _ '} 

MINERAL HOG $Q.60 

FEEDERS f 

500-CHICKXQAL $1 7.25 
BROODERS _^= : l ■ 

3 AND 5 GALLON $1.85 and $0.30 

GALVANIZED FOUNTAINS l L 

26-INCH HOG FENCE; $£.50 

20 RODS - ~ u 

34-QUART MILK $7.75 

COOLERS • • 

SEARS FARM STORE 

13 West Seventh Street Covington, Ky. 

HEmlock 2004 



Johnson and daughter of Critten- 
den spent several days this week 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. 
T. Johnson. • 

Miss Gwendolyn Perrill and girl 
friend of Covington spent the 
week-end with Mr. and Mrs. 
Harve Perrell and family. 

Mrs. William Lillard left Satur- 
day morning for Shelbyville, 
Term, where she will remain with 
her husband who is stationed at 
Camp Forrest, Term. 

Glenn Anderson spent several 
days last week in Covington with 
his sister, Helen Anderson. 

Nancy Pettit spent several days 
last week with her sister, Mr. and 
Mrs. Kline Menefee of Crittenden. 

Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow Greene 
and family entertained the Truth 
Seekers S. S. Class with a party 
Thursday night. Those present 
were: Geneva Lambert, Lucille 
McBee, Helen Smith, Mary 
Carnes, Kathleen Webster, Hazel 
Hendricks, Thelma Miller, Billie 
Rose Lambert, Mr. and Mrs. 
Russell Alexander and daughter, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Anderson, Paul 
Lawrence and Lawrence Pettit. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Jones and 
daughter Wilma had as guests 
Monday, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd 
Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Clay Webster, 
Mrs. Abbie Jones and C. Jones. 

Rev. and Mrs. L. N. Stamper 
spent several days last week with 
his father in Harlan County. 

Barnett and Connie Franks 
were visiting their mother, Mrs. 
Ollie Franks in Covington Sunday. 

Mrs. Clifton Webster spent Fri- 
day night and Saturday with Mrs. 
Vevie Webster at Concord. 

E. A, Greene has moved back to 
this community from Zion. 

We are sorry to report Hobart 
Varner has pneumonia. Others in 
this vicinity who are sick are, 
Mrs. Effie York, Mrs. Vella Pettit, 
Mrs. Rosie Roberts, Mrs. N. J. 
Hughes, Mrs. Minnie Schulker, 
Mrs. Gladys Delph and Jerry 
Roland. 

Mrs. Hugh Bingham and son, 
Barrie are visiting her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Harlowe of Center, 
Ky. 



Tuesday that her sister Mrs. Alice 
Densler had passed away at her 
home in Gallatin County. Funeral 
services were held at Paint Lick 
on Thursday. 

Hughes Johnson of Memphis, 
Tenn., has been here the past 
week with his father, W. C. John- 
son, while Mr. and Mrs. Cloyd 
Johnson and son spent Christmas 
with their parents, Mr. and Mrs 
Cotham of Clarksville, Tenn. 



CARD OF THANKS 



I wish to express my sincere 
thanks and appreciation to all 
my friends and neighbors for 
their expression of sympathy in 
the loss of my Dear Daddy, 
Henry Ellis Borden 

Especially I thank Rev. Dearing 
and Rev. D. E. Bedinger for their 
consoling words, Olivia Wills for 
her sweet songs, the donors of the 
beautiful flowers, and Chambers 
and Grubbs for the effecient 
manner in which they conducted 
the services. 

His Loving Foster Daughter, 
Daisy V. Hill 



Mrs. Helen Shelton were the 
supper guest of Mr. and Mrs. 
Bert Layne of Latonia Thursday 
evening. -^ 

Misses Violet Collins and 
Roberta Clifton of Covington, 
Jean Collins and Ruby Caldwell 
were guests of the Miskell sisters 
during the holidays. 

Mr. and Mrs. Van Spencer of 
Cincinnati visited relatives here 
Sunday. 



VERONA 



SUGAR CREEK 



BEAVER LICK 



Mrs. Fannie Howard and Miss 
Jean Besterman have taken an 
apartment on Woodburn Ave., 
Covington for the winter. 

Mrs. Mattie Griffith left last 
Saturday for Los Angeles, Calif., 
where she will visit her sister, Mrs. 
Mary Rose. 

William Wilson has been laid 
up with an abscessed earl Bud 
Moore has been driving his truck 
during his illness. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Green en- 
joyed a telephone conversation 
with their son, William Huey 
Green last Sunday. William is 
stationed at Shepherd Field, 
Texas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Atha and 
son moved last week from the Hill 
Top Service Station to the farm 
they bought near Verona. 

Cards from Mr. and Mrs. J. E. 
McCabe state they are nicely 
settled at Edinburg, Texas for the 
winter. 

Mrs. Jim Sleet received word 



Do you feel 
"left out of it"? 



Are you missing the chance 
to share in this war — miss- 
ins an experience you'd value 
all your life? 

Bight now, in the WAC, you 
could be doing a vital Army 
Job. You could be getting 
valuable training, meeting 
new people, seeing new places 
while serving your country. 

More Wacs are needed at 
once.- Get full details about 
eligibility, training, pay, the 
jobs Wacs do, how they live. 
Go to the nearest U. S. Army 
Recruiting Station. (Sour 
local post office will give yon 
the address.) Or write: The 
Adjutant General, Boom 
4415, Munitions Building, 
Washington, D. C. Do It 
today! 




EYESTRAIN 



Are you consdoua of a 

strain when you read fine 

print* 

Perhaps you need glasses. 

Consult us today. 

LJ.METZGER 

Optometrist Optlciaa 

€31 Madison Ave. 

Oovlngtoa 

Servtnff Northern Kentucky 
With Comfortable Eyesight 



Miss Dorothy Radford who is 
attending college in Arkansas 
spent the holidays at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Story spent 
Sunday at Lakeland, Ky. 

Miss Jeanette Gross spent Sat- 
urday night with Miss Faye L. 
Prill of Warsaw. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Grizzell and 
son of Ft. Thomas, Ky. and Mrs. 
Henry Stoneking of Lawrence- 
burg, Ind. visited Mr. B. F. Sisson 
during the Xmas week-end.- 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Noell and 
children of Guilford, Ind. visited 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Noell recently. 

Miss Mary^ Jane Johnson of 
Glencoe spent Friday night with 
Miss Dorothy Radford. 

Mrs. Grover Clifton and Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Gross and daughters 
attended the Xmas program at the 
Glencoe Christian Church Sunday 
evening. 

Harry Southerland spent several 
days with his sister, Mrs. R. H. 
Story. 

Robert Clifton and fefcters and 



Winter has indeed visited this 
community with snow and slippery 
roads. 

The school gave a very good 
entertainment on Dec. 23rd. The 
teachers deserve much credit for 
the showing the children made, 
all enjoyed Old Santa. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Wilson of 
Lebanon, Ohio arrived here Dec. 
26th to care for her aunt, Mrs. 
J. N. Blackwell of Verona, who is 
seriously ill. 

Mrs. Alfred Kemper and young 
son returned from St. Elizabeth 
hospital to the home of her 
mother, Mrs. J. A. Harris on 
Christmas Day. 



Rev. and Mrs. Spahr entertain- 
ed the Sunday School with a 
Christmas party on Friday even- 
ing, Dec. 24th. The children en- 
joyed Old St. Nich's visit as well 
as the games and plays. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Rouse and 
children are with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. A. Harris. 



Students who spent the Holi- 
days at their several homes, re- 
turned to their studies Tuesday, 
January 4th: Miss Ella Mae 
Chambers, Miss Martha Brown 
and Miss Jean Farris to State 
College, Miss Mary Belle Alex- 
ander and Miss Thelma Moore to 
Midway. 



A WALTON MAN FELT 
UKE SWOLLEN BALLOON; 
FULL OF STOMACH GAS 



Recently, a Walton man stated 
that he used to feel like a swollen 
balloon after every meal. He 
would bloat full of gas and spit 
up acidulous liquids for hours 
after eating. Was terribly con- 
stipated. This man is one of the 
hundreds in this vicinity who now 
praise ERB-HEP. He states he 
was amazed at the results when 
he took this medicine. Now 
he eats what he wants without gas 
or bloating, and bowels are re- 
gular for the first time in years. 
He feels like a new man. 

ERB-HELP contains 12 Great 
Herbs; they -0163036 bowles, clear 
gas from stomach, act on sluggish 
liver and kidneys. Miserable peo- 
ple soon feel different all over. So 
don't go one suffering! Get ERB- 
HELP. Jones Drug Store. 



Courtesy and Co-operation 

Has enabled us t* become Increasingly valuable te II 
Public upoa wboae patronage we depend. 



DIXIE STATE BANK 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 

Member of Federal 



Public Sale 

HAVING SOLD MY FARM, I WILL OFFER TO THE 
HIGHEST AND BEST BIDDER AT PUBLIC AUCTION AT 
THE FARM, LOCATED 1.4 MILES FORM HIGHWAY NO. 16, 
NEAR VERONA, KENTUCKY. ON 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 8, 1943 

A* 10 O'CLOCK C. W. T. 

THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LIVESTOCK, FARM 
IMPLEMENTS AND HOUSEHOLD GOODS: 

About 35 tons of baled hay, alfalfa, red clover, and timothy; 
nine Hereford Shorthorn calves, about 6 months old; five 
springing heifers, good ones; one bull; five good cows; 48 good 
young ewes; four bucks and one lamb; team of 5-year old grey 
mules; one 10-year old mule, good leader; 100 shocks of fodder; 
two turning plows; one horse jumper plow; two horse jumper 
plow; two rastus plows; two mowing machines; one hay rake; 
one disk harrow; one "A" harrow; one hillside plow; one 
wagon, box bed, and hay bed; three sows, bred; eleven shoats; 
some corn; lot of small farm tools; lot of household goods; 
and other things too numerous to mention. 

D. R. CHAPMAN 

VERONA. KENTUCKY 

TERMS: Cash on all Hems under $10; if desired, credit of 6 
months with bankable note, for items over $10. 

AUCTIONEER: PORTER WELLS 

COME AND SPEND THE DAY— LUNCH WILL BE SERVED 
ON THE GROUNDS 






JLhe Southern serves ♦ ♦ ♦ and sells 

♦ ♦♦the South 



FAITH is the keynote of these adver- 
tisements of the Southern Railway 
System... a compelling, abiding faith in 
the future of America's great and grow- 
ing Southland. 

These advertisements, and others like 
them, appeared in nationally-circulated 
magazines all last year. ..telling their 
inspiring stories to millions of people 
from border to border and from coast 
to coast. ..selling the South. 

Proudly, they tell of the tremendous 
contributions the South is making to 
help speed Victory. 

Proudly, they point to the amazing 
industrial, commercial and agricultural 
growth of the South in recent years. 

Proudly they say, "Look Ahead . . . 
Look. South!". ..for new opportunities 
after the war is over. 

Thus, in stilf another way, the South- 
ern Serves the South. 





SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



I 




THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 




SOCIAL AND 

PERSONAL 



Mr. and Mrs. John Alison of 
-Gardiner, HI. and their daughter, 
Mrs. Richard Shepard of Los 
Angles, Calif, were recent visitors 
of Mrs. Gardiner's sister, Mrs. 
Rod Hughes and family. 

The members of the Walton 
Baptist Church have purchased 
the home formerly owned 
by Harry Mayhugh, but now 
occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Ed 
Jones on North Main St. 

Mr. and Mrs. Luther Stone 
visited Mrs. W. R. Powers who has 
been ill, Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Menice of 
Dayton, Ohio were week end 
suests of Mr. and Mrs. Louis 
Schwab and daughters. 



Mrs. Bess Conrad had as dinner 
guest on Xmas day: Mr. and Mrs. 
J. C. Powers, Mr. and Mrs. Elmo 
Powers and son of Erlanger, Mr. 
and Mrs. O. K. Powers of Verona, 
Mrs. H. A. Alister of Battle Creek. 
Mich, and Mrs E. B. Powers. 

Mr. D. C. Snyder of Newport 
spent Tuesday with his sister, Mrs. 
Cecil Gaines and family. 

Mr and Mrs. Pruett and son 
Clifford Pruett attended the 
funeral of Mr. Pruett's sister, Miss 
Ida Pruett of Latonia Saturday. 
She was buried at Independence. 

Mrs. Minnie Carpenter of Bur- 
lington is spending , some time 
with her sister, Mrs. Cecil Gaines 
and family. 




•• 



tfunMHlnufu.. 
whm saving pays ! 



Accumulate all you can here*, 
and have the highest earnings 
itent with Insured safety. 



FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 
OF COVINGTON 



Ml MAIN STREET (Office Open Daily) 



IMS 



( p ^ H ^ o^f W" — ^e1> " «»*r V» mt ^ fm wi^w^ ww i^lB 



Truett DeMoisey returned to 
Lexington Monday to resume his 
studies at U. K. after having been 
on a trip East as a member of the 
Basket Ball team at U. K. They 
played at Buffalo, N. Y. on Dec. 
28th, .then visited Niagra Pall, 
Canada and played at Madison 
Square Garden. N. Y. City Dec. 
30th., stopped "over in Washington 
D. C. and several other cities of 
interest. They returned to Ky. 
victorious in both games. He spent 
a few days with home folk before 
going back to the University. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Kirkpatrick 
and son Edwin of Burlington 
were the Sunday diner guest of 
their relatives, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil 
Gaines and Judge Gaines of So. 
Main St. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. P. Mann spent 
Christmas Day with her son, Mr 
and Mrs. Raymond Benson and 
family of Forest Hills, Ky. 

Mrs. Thelma Smith visited re- 
latives in the Big Bone neighbor- 
hood and friends in Erlanger and 
Covington during the Christmas 
holidays. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Nicholson 
and sons were guests of their 
daughter and family, Mr. and Mrs 
Dewey Benson and family of 
Burlington on Christmas Day. 

Mrs. Nell Hunt of Verona and 
Mrs. Emma Cluster of Walton left 
on Thursday, December 23rd for 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. to visit with 
Mrs. Hunt's son Albert and Mrs. 
Cluster's husband William Cluster. 
Mrs. Hunt has returned home but 
Mrs. Cluster remained for a longer 
stay. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Stephens of 
Burlington were the dinner guests 
of Mrs. Stephens mother, Mrs. 
Zella Walton, on Christmas Day. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Carlisle and 
son Guy Olen spent Sunday, Dec. 
26th with Mrs. Carlisle's parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Thompson oi 
Carrollton, Ky. 



I our 



m w 



Better have your eyes examined 
—they may be the cause of 
your feeling tired and irritable. 

Jos. B. Schnippering 

Optometrist and Optician 
(Formerly with F. Pieper) 



S Pike Street, Covington 
Phone HElock 0700 




HOW TO GET MORE LIGHT FROM YOUR PRESENT EQUIPMENT 





Keep Lamps Turned Off . 
In Unoccupied Rooms 

Leaving lamps burning in unoccupied rooms not only wastes 
light but shortens the life of lamp bulbs, which use tungsten 
— a criticsl war material. Turn off all lamps and fixtures 
promptly when not in actual use. Your lamp bulbs will stay 
brighter longer, you'll get more useful light at less expense 
and you'll help conserve electricity and vital materials for the 
war effort. 

SIX OTHER WAYS TO CONSERVE LIGHT 

1 Remove and clean lamp bulbs 
•' and lamp bowl* regularly. Dry 
thoroughly before using again. 

9 Keep shade linings light Clean 
' or, brush regularly. Repaint or 
reline dark-colored paper or parch- 
ment (hades. 

J Sk close enough to the lamp 
w " to get all the help it can give 
your eye*. 



A Avoid direct glare from lamp 
- bulbs by using shades deep 
enough and wide enough. 

C Arrange furniture so one lamp 
•" can serve two people. But be 
sure lamp is not too far away from 
either person. 

fi Eliminate amber or flame-dot 
bulbs. Inside-frosted white 
bulbs of same wattage give much 
more light. 



COMMUNITY 

PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 




Miss Sheron Graff returned to 
her home Sunday after spending 
ten days in Louisville with her 
father, R. E. Graff and her grand 
mother, Mrs. E. T. Graff, the later 
accompanied Sheron home and 
spent the day. 

Mrs. Julia A. Rouse and daugh- 
ter Miss Georgia had as guest. for 
New Years dinner, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. W. Hastings and daughter of 
Cincinnati. 

Mrs. Mildred Summers and 
daughter, Miss Marlyn of Er- 
langer, Mrs. Bessie Johnson and 
Miss Melva White accompanied 
Miss Daisy Hill to the buria 1 of 
Mr. Burden in Cynthiana Friday. 

Miss Patty Johnson has return- 
ed home after spending the holi- 
days with her aunt, Mrs. Stanley 
McGuire and other relatives in 
Covington, Ky. s 

Our community was saddened 
by the sudden death of Mr. Henry 
Burden Tuesday, Dec. 28, funeral 
was Friday Morning from Cham- 
bers and Grubbs funeral home, 
with burial at Cynthiania, Ky., 
Battle Grove Cemetery. 

Mrs. Donald Stephenson left for 
Oceanside, California Tuesday 
night to join her husband Pvt. 
Donald L. Stephenson who is in 
the Marines at Camp Pendleton, 
Oceanside, Calif. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Stephenson 
are spending the holidays in Wal- 
ton with relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmo Taggart of 
Dayton, Ohio are spending the 
holidays with Mr. Taggerts 
perents. 

Melva White spent last Thurs- 
day in Cincinnati shopping. 

Omer Dudgeon, Charlie Baker 
and Ray Sparks attended the 
tobacco sale Monday morning at 
Carrollton. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. O. Webster and 
daughter spent Christmas with 
Mrs. Webster's perents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Sam Jones and family of 
English, Ky. Miss Lillian Jones, a 
sister returned home with them 
for several days visit. " 

Pvt. Masil E. Falls of Waco, 
Texas expects to visit her brother, 
James E. Falls and friends in 
Walton about January 13th. 

Mr. William Burden and grand 
daughter, Miss Juanita Bruin of 
Mt. Washington, Ohio attended 
the funeral of their relative, Mr. 
H. E. Burden in Cynthiana, Fri- 
day. — 

Mrs. Sallie R. Miller and Miss 
Emma Jane Miller of South Main 
Street were in Carrollton on Sat- 
urday to spend Christmas Day 
with Mrs. Miller's son, Mr. Fred 
R. Miller and Mrs. Miller and 
their two children, Miss Sara 
Katheryn and Mr. Fred Huey 
Miller. On Sunday Mrs. Miller and 
Miss' Emma Jane joined the John 
L. Jones family for their annual 
Christmas "get-to-gether" at the 
home of Mrs. Jones in Florence. 
Mr. M. C. Carroll of Big Bone 
Springs, Ky. was a business caller 
in Walton on Tuesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Stephen- 
son and son Joe went on Sunday 
to the farm home of Mr. Stephen- 
son's parents near Worthvllle for 
a family Christmas gathering. 

Gaines Edwards Huey returned 
to Millersburg Tuesday where he 
is a student at the Millersburg 
Military Institute, after spending 
three weeks vacation with his 
mother, Mrs Lula Huey and grand 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Ed 
wards. 

Miss Luke Gordon returned to 
her school duties at Versailles, 
Monday, Dec. 27th after a brief 
vacation with her mother, Mrc. 
Esbell Gordon. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Ransler, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Doan and 
daughter June, Mrs. Estell Gordon 
and Miss Luke Gordon, Miss Mary 
Ransler, Mrs. L. T. Utz and 
daughter attended a Christmas 
party at the home of Mr. and Mrs 
S. L. Maze on December 23rd. 

Miss Helen Ruth Gardiner re- 
turned to Walton Saturday even- 
ing after spending the holiday 
vacation with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. L. M. Gardiner and her 
sister, Miss Elaine Gardiner of 
Lexington. 

Mrs. J. B. Doan and daughter 
June, Mrs. Estelle Gordon and 
Miss Mary Ransler spent a plea- 
sant week-end recently with Rev. 
and Mrs. J. M. Ervin of Versailles 
and attended the Christmas 
Cantata at the Versailles Christ- 
ian church. 

Staff Sgt. Lloyd DeSha McElroy 
enjoyed the holidays here with his 
mother, Mrs. Hazel McElroy and 
family. 

Malcolm Simpson who is stat- 
ioned at Staten Island, N. Y. with 
the U. S. Navy spent from Friday 
evening until Sunday afternoon 
with his mother, Mrs. Mayme 
Simpson and visiting friends. A 
short vacation but it is a plea- 
sure to see our boys, If only a short 
time. 

Mrs. Mary Stephens and Mr. 
Jess Hopperton spent Christmas 
Day and Sunday with Mrs. 
Stephens' brothers and sister at 
the Kent Home in Georgetown. 

Rev. and Mrs. Geo. S. Caroiand, 
Rev. and Mrs Cloyd Johnson re- 
turned home Friday evening from 
their Christmas vacation, spent 
with their respective parents in 
Glasgow, Ky. and Clarksville, 
Tenn. 



Sam Jones Hudson, S 2-c with 
the U. S. Navy has completed his 
boot training at Great Lakes and 
is spending his 10-day leave with 
his wife and mother, Mrs. Lula 
Hudson. He expects to leave today 
(Thursday) to continue his train- 
ing in Navy Storekeeping. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Rouse en- 
tertained with dinner Sunday, 
covers were placed for Dr. and 
Mrs. B. W. Stallard and daughter, 
Manell of Madisonville, Ohio, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. W. Rouse and two 
sons, Jack and Asa, and Mrs. 
Fannie Brittenhelm.- 

Tommie Kemphart has recover- 
ed from a severe case of the flu. 

Mrs. Lucy Beatty who is nurs- 
ing Mrs. A. M. Edwards returned 
Sunday after a visit of three 
weeks with her daughter, Mrs. 
Russell Davis of Covington. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Rouse en- 
tertained for the Christmas week 
end at their home on Bedinger 
Avenue for their relatives, Mr. and 
Mrs. Wm. Bertram and two child- 
ren of Greenville, Ohio, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ralph Carpenter and two 
children, Mr. and Mrs. Scott Jack 
and daugher, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. 
Jack and M O. Jack of Beaver. 

Mrs. Lula Vest, Mrs. Kate Noell 
and her two grand children, Jo 
Ann and Dona of Covington spent 
the past week in Crittenden with 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Menefee. 

Rev. and Mrs. R. F. DeMoisey 
spent New Years Day and Sunday 
with their son, John R. DeMoisey 
and family of Greendale, Ky. 

A family dinner was enjoyed 
New Years Day at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. W. Ransler. 
Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. 
J. B. Doan and daughter Miss 
June, Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Maze 
and daughter Sue Ann, Mrs. 
Estelle Gordon and Miss Mary 
Ransler. 

Dan Bedinger who has been ill 
with the flu is able to be out. 

Mr. and Mrs. Powers Conrad 
spent Christmas night and part 
of Sunday with their relatives, 
Mr. and Mrs. Conrad Stephenson 
at Dry Ridge. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Hall had as 
house guests during the holidays, 
Mrs. Hall's brother, Mr. Edgar 
Purdon and wife of St. Peters- 
burg, Fla. 

Mrs. Amela Britt of Covington 
was the guest of her sisters, Mrs. 
John C. Bedinger and family and 
Mrs. C. C. Sleet and family during 
the Christmas Holidays. 



J. L HAMILTON & SON 



FUNERAL SERVICE 



VERONA 



t 



Q>^ /E >*<«'^ iL" <«»JL» ■ *a*Jb** m iJh*»m n J ) m ti sj 




KENTUCKY 



Rev. and Mrs. R. R. Rose of 
Paintsville spent the Christmas 
vacation with Mrs. Rose's parents 
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Chandler and 
her sister Mrs. Olivia Mills and 
daughter. 



John R. DeMoisey of Greendale, 
was called to Cincinnati Monday 
to accompany a boy to that in- 
stitution. On his way to Cincin- 
nati he stopped to see his parents 
Rev. and Mrs. R. F. DeMoisey. 



When In Covington 



*&$± 




LANG'S CAFETERIA 

623-625 Madison Ave. 
Covington 






TOBACCO PRICES 
KENTON HOUSE 

Covington, Ky. 

Dec. 7 $47.75 per Hundred Average 

Dec. 8 49.10 per Hundred Average 

Dec. 9 45.20 per Hundred Average 

Dec. 10 47.94 per Hundred Average 

Dec. 13 48.58 per Hundred Average 

Dec. 14 ...... 46.52 per Hundred Average 

Dec. 15 49.55 per Hundred Average 

Dec. 16 45.55 per Hundred Average 

Dec. 17 46.68 per Hundred Average 

Dec. 20 44.74 per Hundred Average 

Dec. 21 43.21 per Hundred Average 

Dec. 22 43.74 per Hundred Average 

PRICES ON THE COVINGTON MARKET ARE 
AS HIGH AS ANY IN THE BURLEY BELT. 

No Waiting. Sales Every Day 

Kenton Loose Leaf 
Tobacco Warehouse 

2nd & Scott Sts., Covington, Ky. 

Phone Hemlock 3552 

Herbert Whitley, Gen. Mgr. .' 
Dave Gaines and Joe Duncan, Auctioneers 




T ,. , .^ . .,^. T ..,. t . ., . I , i. ., ,, lV yj 



see f he 





Setvu NEW 



SPRING CATALOG 



It will pay you to take time of f to see the "pre-view" of Sears 
n ew 1944 Spring Catalog now at our One-Stop Shopping 
Service Catalog Sales Department. We took a few advanced 
copies off the press and rushed them here by express, because 
production and delivery difficulties will delay the regular 
ma i l i n g to our customers' homes until later. Come in 
tomorrow - be among the first to see and select the fresh new 
things for Spring from over 1000 pages of important values. 
Shop the Sears Catalog Way and Save. Stop at Sears Catalog 
Sales Dek, the One-Stop Shopping Service. 



,«*«. CATA10G 
SALES DEPT 




tim Ate Invited 
iaSee'il Ho* 1 - 



■ ■■PPWIf?:-'.-::-::::--.-:*:-* 1 "'-' 

Covington 13 West Seventh St. HE 2004 




E_E_ 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



Thursday, January 6, 1944 



WEEKLY NEWS ANALYSIS 



Allied Chiefs Map Invasion Strategy 
As Axis Staggers From Heavy Blows; 
American Troops Tighten Jap Noose 
By Occupation of New Britain Island 



^^^ai^assnssxs^R sasarc^sssss 



Released by Weitern Newspaper Union 




right) walks deck of English flagship with Brit.in'a First Sea Lord A. 

JL. if r" iMty . m ££k S - A *"IrJ H. R. Stark before hi. home 
fleet sunk Germany'* 26,000-ton battleship Scharnhorst. 



LABOR: 

U. S. Runs Rails 

Railroads fell into government 
hands as President Roosevelt moved 
quickly to avert strikes which threat- 
ened to tie IX S. freight and passen- 
ger transportation into a knot, and 
return to private ownership was 
promised after passage of the emer- 
gency. 

FDR acted when the brotherhoods 
of conductors, switchmen and fire- 
men and enginemen refused his of- 
fer to arbitrate their dispute even 
though two other brotherhoods, the 
trainmen and engineers, accepted 
the proposal and were awarded a 
nine cents an hour wage increase 
and a one-week vacation with pay. 
Also accepting FDR's arbitration 
Offer at the zero hour were 15 non- 
operating unions representing 1,100,- 
000 workers, who agreed to the gov- 
ernment's recent wage increase 
from 10 cents an hour to the lowest 
paid to 4 cents an hour to the highest 
paid, but also asked for overtime 
beyond 40 hours. 

Steel Workers Back 

Answering an appeal of President 
Roosevelt, '170,000 striking steel 
workers trooped back to the nation's 
mills after a three-day walkout, in 
protest over the War Labor board's 
refusal to promise payment of new 
wage raises back to the date the 
old contracts expired. 

In appealing to the CIO's United 
Steel Workers of America, FDR did 
so on the understanding that any 
new pay boosts would date back to 
the time the old pacts ended. If any 
such back payments chewed into 
steel company finances, FDR prom- 
ised price revisions. 
I The steel workers demanded a 17 
cents an hour raise over the present 
78 cents an hour rate. If granted, 
the increase would crack the War 
Labor board's so-called "Little 
Steel" formula, limiting pay boosts 
to. J5 per cent over the January, 
1941, levels. 




INVASION: 

Eisenhower Chief 

"We will win the European war 

In 1944.". 
With these words Gen. Dwight D. 

Eisenhower assumed command of 
the Allied forces 
for the invasion 
of the western 
gate of Hitler's 
Fortress Europe. 
As Eisenhower 
went to work in 
preparation for 
the knockout 
blow, he was aid- 
ed by a staff 
which assisted 

Gen. Eisenhower him in driving the 

Africa and Sicily. Axis from North 

and in invading 

Italy. 

As his deputy. 
General Eisen- 
hower has British 
Air Chief Marshal 
Arthur Tedder. 
To U. S. Lieut. 
Gen. Carl Spaatz 
has gone the task 
of strategic bomb- 
ing of Nazi sup' 
ply and commu- 
nications centers. And in charge of 
British ground forces is tough, swag- 
gering Gen. Bernard Montgomery. 

In the nation's- capital. Senator 
Edwin Johnson (Colo.) said he was 
informed U. S. troops will make up 
73 per cent of the invasion forces. 



RUSSIA: 
One-Two 

Delivering a stiff one-two punch, 
Russian armies struck at the Ger- 
mans in the north and south, knock- 
ing them off balance in both sectors. 

Greatest surprise came in the 
south, where Gen. Nicholas Vatutin's 
first Ukraine army struck below the 
main battle line about the rail junc- 
tion of Zhitomir, driving a deep dent 
in the enemy's positions before the 
Nazis could rush up reserves. 

To the north, the Reds continued 
their pressure around Vitebsk, for- 
mer anchor for the Germans' Bal- 
tic lines running up to Leningrad. 

WAR PRODUCTION: 
Pattern Changes 

Principally because Allied armies 
have swung from the defensive to 
the offensive, the pattern of war 
production in the U. S. has changed, 
with emphasis on ships, planes, 
heavy construction material and sig- 
nal equipment, and de-emphasis on 
tanks, small arms and anti-aircraft 
artillery. 

Ships of all kinds are. needed for 
landing operations and supply; more 
planes are required for covering ex- 
panding fronts; heavy construction 
material is a must for building op- 
erational bases in occupied territo- 
ries, and signal equipment has to be 
furnished to round out the services' 
growth. 

On the other hand, shipbuilders' 
demands for steel and the effective- 
ness of anti-tank guns has led to a 
cut in tank output Peak production 
has resulted in an overabundance 
of small arms and munitions. Im- 
probability of enemy air raids over 
the U. S. and the increasing defen- 
sive strength of our air force, have 
determined reductions in the antf- 
aircraft artillery program. 





Marshal Tedder 



WHISKY: 

Control New Brands 

The saddened lot of U. S. whisky 
drinkers was made lighter with 
OPA's decision to slap price ceilings 
on new brands making their debut 
since March, 1942, when controls 
were set over the old brands. 

OPA set flat dollars and cents ceil- 
ings plus federal taxes at proces- 
sors' levels for all bottled in bond, 
straight whisky and blends of 
straight whiskies estimated at 80 
proof. Wholesalers and retailers 
were allowed markups, plus state 
taxes. 

Similar ceilings have been sched- 
uled for new brands of rum, brandy, 
gin, cordials and liqueurs. OPA 
said. 



Washington, D. C 
FARM LAND BOOM ' 

Secretary of Agriculture Wickard 
will soon trot up to Capitol Hill with 
a proposed bill in his pocket to put 
an end to the farm land boom. He 
Is keenly worried about speculation 
in farm properties, has made a cou- 
ple of speeches on that subject, but 
has not disclosed the full extent of 
the penalties he will propose to stop 
land speculation. 

His bill carries a tax of 90 per 
cent on profits from the sale of 
farms held less than two years. In 
other words, if a farm is bought and 
then sold again in a few months, 
the deal is obviously for speculation, 
not for farm production, and the 
profit would be practically confiscat- 
ed by the proposed tax. 

Farm sales are so heavy that, if 
the present trend continues, they 
will surpass those of 1919-20, which 
was a record year. Iowa farm 
land, for example, is bringing $225 
an acre. 

Wickard has evidence indicating 
that the men engaged in this specu- 
lative buying are not farmers, and 
most of them are not even residents 
of farm areas. They are investment 
houses and insurance companies, 
who have money lying around loose 
and think they can make a killing, 
as they did in World War I. 

The record of their speculation in 
that period is still written black on 
the pages of farm history. It is seen 
every time AAA makes benefit pay- 
ments, for the largest checks In 
many states go, not to Individual 
farmers, but to insurance companies 
and banks which have bought land 
or taken it over by foreclosing 
mortgages. 

Wickard is prepared for opposi- 
tion to his bill. However, the oppo- 
sition will come, not from farm ele- 
ments, but from the speculators, and 
also from Wall street brokers who 
fear that the next move might be a 
capital-gains tax on stock-market op- 
erations. 



Washington Ditfestj 



'Realistic' Attitude Marks 
Chang e in Allied Dipl omacy 

New Journey Into International Cooperation 

Combines Idealism and Realism; Step 

Away From Old Style Power Alliances. 



By BAUKHAGE 

/Veins Analyst and Commentator. 



AGRICULTURE: 
CCC Spends More 

Fulfilling commitments to farm- 
ers to support higher prices of crops 
and livestock products, the Commod- 
ity Credit corporation increased its 
loans and purchases to 3% billion 
dollars for the fiscal year 1943. 

In addition to stimulating produc- 
tion, CCC said its expenditures as- 
sisted OPA in maintaining price ceil- 
ings, particularly for vegetable oils, 
dairy products, poultry products and 
meats. 

Prices principally were supported 
by loans to farmers on commodities 
stored against civilian and military 
requirements, and by lend-lease pur- 
chases. Of 2 billion, 700 million 
dollars worth of commodities CCC 
bought, about 1% billion dollars 
were for lend-lease account. 

Beans and Peas 

Despite record production of beans 
and peas in 1943, U. S. civilians 
will receive a per capita supply in 
1944 equal to the average for 1935-'39. 

Of the 23,000,000 bags of beans and 
6,800,000 bags of peas which will be 
available in 1944, U. S. military serv- 
ices will get 3,441,000 bags of beans 
and 300,000 bags of peas. 

U. S. Allies, liberated areas and 
jU. S. territories will receive 7,085,- 
000 Dags of beans and 3,512,000 bags 
of peas, with Russia's share approx- 
imating 3,024,000 bags of beans and 
723,000 bags of peas, and Great 
Britain's 872,000 bags of beans and 
509,700 bags of peas. 



Naval Action 

Naval action featured the war in 
Europe, with Germany's 26,O00-ton 
battleship, the Scharnhorst, going to 
the bottom off the North Cape of 
Norway under the heavy salvo of 
Britain's home fleet commanded by 
Adm. Sir Bruce A. Fraser. 

Fighting in rain and mud, U. S. 
and British forces continued to 
punch holes in the Nazis' winter 
line in southern Italy, but advances 
were slow against a fanatical enemy 
battling to the last, and covering 
his withdrawals with sheets of blaz- 
ing fire from flame throwers. 

The Scharnhorst sailed from her 
hiding place in one of Norway's 
vaulting fjords to prey on an Allied 
convoy bound for Russia and was 
surprised by the British fleet. While 
His Majesty's cruisers shadowed the 
Scharnhorst from one side, the 35,- 
000-ton Duke of York and other units 
moved up from the other. Caught 
between two fires, the big German 
Battle-wagon was .finished off by the 
British cruiser Jamaica. 

SOUTHWEST PACIFIC: 
Vise Closes 

While the Tokyo radio bleated that 
Japan's No. 1 South Pacific base ol 
Rabaul must be held at all costs, 
U. S. troops tightened their foot- 
hold on the western end of New 
Britain island on which it stands. 

With Allied forces already ring- 
ing Rabaul in by occupation of cen- 
tral New Guinea to the west and the 
Solomons to the east, the noose was 
drawn still tighter by actual land- 
ings on New Britain itself, first by 
the U. S. Sixth army at Arawe and 
second by U. S. marines on Cape 
Gloucester. 

Long a feeder point for Jap posi- 
tions on New Guinea and the Solo- 
mons, U. S. occupation of the north 
and south shores of the western end 
of New Britain tended to cripple 
the elaborate barge routes which 
the enemy set up to shuttle sup- 
plies to their embattled troops. 



CIO: 

Political Action 

Seeking to mobilize 14 million la- 
bor votes, the CIO has organized a 
political action committee, headed 
by the Amalgamated Clothing Work- 
ers' chieftain, Sidney Hillman. 

Declaring the object of the com- 
mittee is to organize labor for ob- 
taining effective representation In 
government, Hillman said immedi- 
ate aim "is to wrest control -of the 
congress from . . . die-hard Repub- 
licans and anti-New Deal Democrats 
who have defaulted in their duties 
not alone to labor but to the whole 
nation on home-front issues." 

Already engaged in joint or simi- 
lar action with the AFL in many 
states, the CIO committee is seeking 
support of the railroad brotherhoods 
and such farm groups as the Na- 
tional Grange". Funds totaling $700,- 
000 already have been raised. 

News Oddities 

When frightened thoroughbreds 
could -a»4 be budged from their stalls 
during a fire in Atlanta, Ga., re- 
cently, the caretaker remembered 
the old adage that a white mule can 
lead horses from a burning building. 

Haltering a white mole from a 
nearby stable, the caretaker led the 
animal into the burning building, 
and, sure enough, the panicked, 
neighing horses quieted down and 
followed the white mule out. 
* * * 

Skidding on a hill during a sleet 
storm near Methuen, Mass., a sand- 
ing truck ripped through the side of 
a house and came to a stop, with 
its hood over the bed of a startled 
young couple. No one was hurt. 

HOGS: 

New Floor Temporary 

The government's extension of the 
"floor" price for hogs from 200 to 
300 pounds. is a temporary measure 
designed to provide farmers with an 
equitable market during the present 
high tide of shipments, War Food 
administration declared. 

When the gluts are cleared, WFA 
said, the government will again go 
back to the 200 to 270 pound floor 
range, but farmers will be notified 
of the change. 

Because of congestion, WFA said, 
some farmers have been unable to 
obtain permits for shipping hogs, 
and they have hesitated to send their 



HIGHLIGHTS 



in the week's newt 



FEDERAL PAYROLL: Number 
of employees on the federal payroll 
declined in October for the fourth 
consecutive month, now standing at 
2,952,013, as compared with 2,960,019 
a month earlier. 

FREIGHT CARS: New freight cars 
on order on December 1 numbered 
36,253, as compared with 28,108 on 
the same date of 1942. Locomotives 
on order also increased. 



PENICILLIN: A chemical com 
pany in Terre Haute, Ind., is be- 
ginning production of penicillin, the 
new wonder drug that is derived 
from a mold. 

HAY: Race horse owners have 
to pay so much for horse feed thai 
they are worried about hijackers. 
It is reported from Florida that mo- 
torcycle policemen guard trucks 
loaded with hay, oats and carrots. 



ELK HILLS BOILS 

Latest developments in the Elk 
Hills oil controversy are known only 
to those who can see the inner work- 
ings of the cabinet. 

Attorney General Biddle was ex- 
pected to denounce the navy's con- 
tract witirStandard Oil of California 
as illegal. The reason he didn't Is 
that two cabinet colleagues got next 
to him and changed his tune. 

Experts in the justice department 
have declared the contract definite- 
ly illegal, and passed their findings 
along to Biddle. Biddle, In turn, was 
expected to tell the bouse naval af- 
fairs committee the same thing, with 
the result that congress would un- 
doubtedly recommend condemna- 
tion. Thus, Standard of California 
would relinquish all. the property to 
the government. 

But when Biddle appeared before 
the committee, he pulled his 
punches. Instead of declaring the 
contract illegal, he merely stated 
that he had "grave doubts" about it. 

The committee was expecting a 
forthright statement. Even its 
chairman, Congressman Vinson of 
Georgia, who is very close to navy 
officials, privately favors condemna- 
tion 

Secret of what happened is this. 
Two cabinet colleagues got hold of 
Biddle's coattails. One was Secre- 
tary of the Navy Knox, who was 
responsible for the contract in the 
first place; the other was Harold 
Ickes, whose Petroleum administra- 
tion is headed by a Standard Oil of 
California executive. 

The fight is not over. Look for 
fireworks in public hearings before 
the committee next month 
• • • 

SUBSIDY ISSUE POSTPONED 

The 9-8 vote by which the Bank- 
head anti-subsidy bill was defeated 
in the senate banking and currency 
committee came as a surprise to in- 
siders. 

When they first took it up behind 
closed doors, most members of the 
committee figured that the bill would 
be reported out favorably and that 
Roosevelt would suffer a resounding 
defeat on subsidies. As it turned 
out, the deciding vote for subsidies 
was cast by Republican Senator Jo- 
seph Ball of Minnesota, whom Bank- 
head supporters considered in theuf 
anti-subsidy camp. >k 

Terrific pressure had been exerted' 
on Ball by some of the big dairy 
interests in his state. However, the 
young Minnesotan is a fearless 
statesman who believes in putting 
the interests of the nation and of the 
majority of the people over special 
or state interests. He not only voted 
against the inflationary Bankhead 



NT 



animahr to more distant markets - biU * but also a * alnst ihe Taf * «>m- 
because of shrinkage losses and !?°. miS, L^ hich was Ucked by * ^P- 
higher transportation costs. 

GOODS DISTRIBUTION 

Communities that have been find 
ing difficulty in getting their share 
of such scarce items as flashlights, 
bobby pins, cooking utensils and 
electric appliances can expect a 
larger supply soon. The War Pro- 
duction board has asked manufac- 
turers and wholesalers to make vol- 
untary changes in their allotment 
schedules. 

Shortages are particularly acute 
in cities that have -expanded in the 
last year or two, because of an in- 
flux of war workers. 






sided vote. 

• • • 
TIP ON PEACE; RUMORS 

Note to New York stock brokers: 
When you get panicky over peace ru- 
mors, read the following words of 
Col. N. B. Briscoe, commanding of- 
ficer at Fort Knox, Ky.: 

"There is much talk of early 
peace. If you were in a poker game, 
consider when you would like the 
game to end. Obviously that would 
be when you had all the chips in 
front of you. The Germans and the 
Japanese would be greatly pleased 
to make peace now while they hold 
captured possessions." 



WNU Service, Union Trust Building, 
Washington, D. C. 

What kind of a man is Stalin? 

That question was put to President 
Roosevelt at the White House press 
and radio conference on the day of 
his return to Washington from Eu- 
rope. He was tanned, alert, cheer- 
ful, still pulsing with the conscious- 
ness of achievement. His answer, 
which came without a second's hesi- 
tation, I thought, was significant. 

Stalin, he said, was a realist, just 
like himself. 

I am not particularly interested in 
the accuracy of that answer, either 
as an analysis of Stalin or self- 
analysis of the President. But to me 
the fact that the President chose 
realism as the outstanding and com- 
mon characteristic of himself and 
the man on whose word and deed 
so much of the future depends, was, 
I think, significant. 

On the whole, in the light of later 
pronouncements, use of that term 
seems a good omen rather than a 
bad one. 

Mr. Roosevelt is committed to a 
plan for the postwar world which 
leans toward the ideal, rather than 
toward the old style diplomatic 
"realism" which is nothing but tooth- 
and-claw tactics behind a laundered 
facade of protocol. I think the 
American people have shown plainly 
that they are more interested in 
stopping — or at least postponing— 
wars than they are in the slogans of 
the Isolationists or the imperialists. 
Granted that, the fact that Roose- 
velt emphasizes the "realist" side 
when he speaks, gives one a feeling 
that he and Stalin and Churchill 
have been able to reach some rough 
agreements that are practical 
enough to work, and yet are a little 
less earthy than the old power alli- 
ances, which always end in wars 
and always will. 

The Conference 

I recall very well that crowded 
news conference for which friend 
and foe alike turned out to see what 
the President looked like after his 
trip. One hundred and seventy-nine 
working press and radio correspond- 
ents were^ there, not counting offi- 
cials. The innocent expected some 
hot, inside stuff; the cynical hoped 
the President would reveal errors 
by concealing them; the average re- 
porter knew it was going to be a 
good story one way or the other. 
Everyone was satisfied. Those who 
yearned for the dramatic got the 
story of the German plot which 
didn't come off. Those who were 
looking for trouble were gratified 
that he revealed no new concrete de- 
velopments. The objective reporter 
got his quota of news, for everything 
a President says Is that. 

But the two remarks of the Presi- 
dent stood out in my mind — the one 
I mentioned (realism) and another, 
made almost as soon as the last of 
us had squeezed into the crowded 
oval office, and they were, I be- 
lieve, most revealing as far as our 
future foreign policy goes. 

Those in the first row had time to 
take in the President's cheerful and 
informal appearance — the colored 
shirt and the pull-over sweater 
which he had worn on his trip — and 
which, because of one meeting fol- 
lowing another from the moment he 
arrived at the White House, he still 
wore. He had been on the job since 
9:30 a. m. — it was then after four. 

As soon as the signal that the 
last reporter was in the room was 
given, the President began to speak 
of the success of the trip, and he 
said that those who shared with him 
in the hopes of a durable peace (he 
referred to Russia, Britain, China) 
were motivated by the determina- 
tion that there would not be another 
war while this generation lives. 

I must admit that the words at 
first struck me a little coldly— 
"while this generation lives." Not 
much long-range optimism there, I 
thought. But afterward and since 
Vis later pronouncements, general 
though they have been, I feel a lit- 
tle better about it It seems to me 
tha> perhaps we are at last em- 
barked upon an adventure in inter- 
national cooperation with enough 
idealist* to keep our eyes on the 
heavens' and enough realism to keep 
our feet; on the ground. That is my 
New Yeur's hope and wish. 



Analysis of a 
Reporter's Job 

As I sit down to my typewriter, 
I sometimes try to visualize the 
people who will read what I write- 
just as I try to visualize the little 
groups gathered about the loud- 
speaker when I talk to them. 

Sometimes I shudder lest they ex- 
aggerate the importance of the 
things we reporters report. 

I am not a bit different from the 
anxious anonymous reporter who, 
after the last war, still clad in his 
khaki shirt, wearing the OD (it's 
"GI" now) tie and trench coat, who 
came down to work and stumbled 
around the various offices and meet- 
ings getting his stories and writing 
them under the eagle eye of the 
copy desk. 

The reason I am worried now is 
because I hear so many people talk 
about the things "the Washington 
correspondent" writes— or says on 
the radio— as gospel. Well, most of 
us try to report what we see and 
hear. We don't always know wheth- 
er it is true or false. We Just try 
to tell you about it. Most of us label 
what we know and what we think. 
Some do not. 

Sometimes when we talk with peo- 
ple we think really ought to know, 
we report what they say with a lit- 
tle more confidence. If we can't 
quote the "Brass Hat" or the cabi- 
net officer or the senator who told 
us this or that we say "authoritative 
quoters." We are supposed to know 
from experience whether what we 
hear is sound fact or just wishful 
thinking. 

The longer we live, the better we 
are able to judge between the real 
people and the phonies. Most old- 
timers in the government don't try 
to fool reporters because they know 
they can only do that once. Maybe 
twice. 

You know the old Scotch proverb: 
"If he cheats you once, shame on 
him; if he cheats you twice, shame 
on you»" 

Many people think that unless we 
attack the party in power, we must 
be in favor of it. That isn't true. 
We know, as the old bull said, "One 
cow is much as another." We know 
that despite the different party re- 
galia politicians display, they are 
really pretty much alike once they 
get into office — not as good as they 
might be for the most part, seldom 
as bad as the opposition paints them. 

The Active Element 

But the party in power is the ac- 
tive element, it makes news because 
it does things. The minority merely 
objects. We report what is done. I 
Not because we approve or disap- ' 
prove of what is tione but because ! 
that is a concrete act. The opposi- 
tion can do little more than oppose. | 
That is negative. We know that if 
the opposition were in power, it 
might do the same thing, and the I 
party in power, which would then 
be the minority, would object. 

That is hard for the partisan lay- 
man to understand. We know that 
We have ideas, too, and the party in 
power usually has some pretty good 
ones which the minority has to ob- 
ject to, merely on party grounds. 
Not being of either party we, the 
reporters, may also become parti- 
sans not really of the party but of 
some of the party's ideas. 

It is hard to make some people 
believe that we are not partisan 
when we are objective, easy to make 
others believe we are not when we 
are. 

I have covered Republican and 
Democratic regimes. I have cov- 
ered one Democratic regime a long 
time. I certainly hope, for the good 
of the state, that I shall be able to 
cover a regime of. the Republican 
party, not because I think it is per 
se better or worse than the Demo- 
cratic regime but because I think 
a change is good for the republic. 

When the next administration 
comes in, I shall report what It does. 
I shall lean, in spite of myself, to- 
ward the constructive issues it pro- 
mulgates. But that won't I hope, 
make" me a Republican any more 
than my leanings toward the con- 
structive side in this regime make 
me a Democrat. I am neither. I 
am, and hope to remain, a reporter. 
But as beauty lies in the eye of the 
beholder, so truth often lies in the 
ear of the listener. 




ESS*? 









I - r 



TJERE'S a fascinator crocheted 
*■ ■* in wool for fall that has a "dif- 
ferent look." A cluster of rose* 
atop your pompadour gives a "fin- 
ished," calot-like effect. A double 
shell stitch edging ripples round 
your face. The pattern stitch is 
finished quick as can be. 
• • • 

Pattern No. 7623 contains instructions 
for fascinator; stitches; list of materials. 

Due to an unusually large demand and 
current war conditions, slightly more time 
is required in filling orders for a few of 
the most popular pattern numbers. 

For this pattern send your order to: 



- ■ Sewing Circle Needlecraft Dept. 
564 W. Randolph St Chicago 89, ni. 


Enclose 15 cents (plus one 
cover colt of mailing) for 


cent to 
Pattern 












., ., ._ 



Night Sight 

* — 

Visual purple, the pigment used 
in night vision, is bleached so 
quickly by light that it is replaced 
constantly, even in the dark. Affc- 
er"*15 minutes in a pitch-black 
room, so much visual purple ac- 
cumulates that the photo sensitiv- 
ity of the eye is increased more 
than 2,000 times. 



I 



Coughing 

COLDS 

Relieve Distress 
Time-Tested Way 

»««w«roiic 1 . ( 

# *^PENETlttTES 

to upper bronchial 1 

tubes with soothing 

medicinal vapors. 

STIMULATES 

chest and back sur- 

*_, faces like a warm- 

^s, ing poultice. 

**««»• WtMOUt* 111 

MIUIONS OF MOTHERS relieve dis- 
tress of colds this double-action 
way because it's so effective -so 
easyl Just rub throat, chest, 
and back with good old Vlcks 
VapoRub at bedtime. 

Instantly VapoRub goes to work 
-2 ways at ones, as illustrated 
abo*e-to relieve coughing 
spasms, help clear congestion in 
upper bronchial tubes, and invite 
restful, comforting sleep. Often 
by morning most of the misery 
of the cold is gone. « •«.^»> -fc 
When a cold strikes, l/ICKS 
try time-tested VVa-oRua 




BRIEFS* • • by Baukhage 



Best seller in Britain today la a 
booklet jjm how to stretch a clothes 
coupon. ., Called "Make Do and 
Mend," the booklet offers the Brit- 
ish houstiwife a wealth of informa- 
tion on hi)w to utilise her old clothes 
and household linen to the last 
thread— by methods which would 
have made her shudder in peace- 
time. The booklet is one of the most 
popular publications. 



The Printed Word 

A drop of ink makes millions 
think.— L. W. Neff. 



FALSE TEETH 

AND a 

GRAND SMILE '/! 



Two hundred Australian girls re- 
cently attended the first meeting in 
Melbourne of a club whose mem- 
bership is limited to Australian girls 
either married to or engaged to 
American servicemen. The object is 
to enable girls who may later be- 
come neighbors in America to be- 
come acquainted in Australia. They 
feel they can be of mutual assist- 
ance in solving new problems. 



YOU CAN IAUGH, TALK 
AND EAT, FREE OF FUR 

IMBAERASSMENT 

It's so easy to enjoy all-day confidence 
when your plates are held firmly and safely 
m place by this "comfort-cushion"— a 
dentist's formula. 

•-Recommended by 
dentists for SO years. 
1. Economical: small 
amount lasts longer. 
4. Para and harmless 
-pleaaant tasting. 

Al/oW*-** Mosey oedr*aof, 



I. Dr. Wemet's Pow- 
der lata you enjoy 

solid Joods, avoid em- 
barrassment of loose) 
pistes. Helps prevent 
sore gums. 



Dr. Wernet's Porvder 




Thursday, January 6, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 





OF f Hi YEA* 




The year began with these im- 
portant events: 

January 

1— Russian! capture Velikye 
Luki, great railway center. 
8— 78th Congress convenes. 
13— British troops enter Tripoli, 

capital of Libya. 
25— Advancing Russians take 

Voronezh, Nazi anchor. 
26— "Unconditional Surrender" 
agreement of Casablanca 
conference announced. 




January 



1— Russians recapture Velikye Luki, 

railroad center. . 
4— U. S. Department of War Informa- 
tion announces 61,126 service casual- 
ties to date. 

12— U. S. planes based In Africa bomb 
Naples, Italy. 

19— British only 40 miles from Tripoli. 

23— British enter Tripoli, Libyan capital. 

33— Voronezh, big Nazi stronghold. Jails 
to Russians. 

26— "Unconditional Surrender" agree- 
ment of Casablanca announced. 



February 



S — Last German troops surrender In 
Stalingrad; U. S. Naval forces repel 
major Japanese attacks in Solomons 
area. 
6 — Allied headquarters establish sepa- 
rate U. S. command for North Africa. 
• — Last Japa withdraw from Guadal- 
canal. 

14 — Rostov and Voroshilovgrad captured 
by Russians. 

16— Russians take Kharkov, Important 
base. 

16 — Cruiser Chicago is sunk by Japs; 
U. S. Navy reports IS Jap ships hit. 

26— U. S. flyers raid Kiska In Aleutians. 

March 

3 — Rzhev retaken by Russians. 

4 — Allied bombers destroy Jap convoy 
of 22 Ship*. 

11— British attack Mareth line In Tunisia. 

IT — American forces take Gafsa in Tu- 
nisia. 

SO — Chinese check Jap drive in Hupeh- 
Hunan region. 

24 — Advancing Russians retake Ablnsk 
and other towns near Smolensk. 

26— <U. S. and British troops advance In 
Tunisia. 

21 — British take Matouia and two other 
cities In Tunisia. 



April 



1— Fortresses raid Cagllarl, Sardinia; 

Chinese drive Japs back into Burma. 

4— Chinese retake Chuchlachuan. 

5 — Allies bomb Naples, Kiel, Antwerp, 

Brest 

17 — Bremen and other north German 

cities bombed in "biggest raid." 
20 — Russians attack on Kuban front. 
21 — Japanese execute U. S. flyers. 
23 — U. S. Naval forces occupy Funafuti 
Islands, southwest Pacific. 



May 



6 — Lt. Gen. Jacob Devers is named U. S. 

commander of European theater. 
7 — Bizerte falls to Americans; British 

first army takes Tunis. 
14 — Last resistance ends in North Africa. 
19— XT. S. bombers raid Pantellerla, Itali- 
an Island fortress. 
23 — Guerrilla warfare spreads In Balkans. 
30 — Japs admit loss of Attu. 
31 — French Alexandria fleet joins Allies. 

June 

9— Curtln says Invasion danger past In 

Australia. * 

11 — Pantellerla, Italian Island fortress, 

surrenders. 
12 — Lampedusa, fortified Italian island, 

capitulates. 
13 — Chinese recapture Sungtze, port city. 
16 — Chinese charge Japs use gas. 
17— RAF bombs Cologne. 
SO— U. S. forces land on Rendova. In 

Solomons. 



July 



1 — Rendova taken by U. S. forces. 
6 — Russians launch offensive on 160 
mile front; U. S. Navy battles Japs 
off Solomons. * 

12 — British capture Syracuse. 
23 — U. S. troops enter Palermo. 
24 — Americans take Marsala, Trapanl. 
25— MUSSOLINI RESIGNS. KING EM- 
MANUEL ASSUMES GOVERNMENT. 
27— Italian peace negotiations begin. 
28 — Fascist party dissolved. 



August 



1— U. S. planes bomb Ploesti refineries. 
8 — Russians take Orel; British capture 

Catania, In Sicily. 
• — Americans occupy Munda, in Solo- 
mons. 

11 — Russians drive into Ukraine. 

17 — Allies enter Messina; Island of Vela 
Lavella in Solomons taken. 

18 — Resistance ends on Sicily. 

21 — U. S. and Canadian troops occupy 
Kiska. 

34— Quebec conference on war plans 
ends. • 

39 — British Admiral Mountbatten made 
chief of Allied Southeast Asia com- 
mand. 

SO— Russians retake Taganrog, Nazi an- 
chor. 



September 



1 — Japs withdraw air base from New 

Guinea. 
2— Allied forces invade mainland of 

Italy near Reggio Calabria. 
7 — Allies capture Palmi, Dellanova. 
6— ITALY SURRENDERS UNCONDI- 
TIONALLY; Stallno, steel center, 
falls to Russians. 
9— British troops take Taranto; Great- 
est Allied raids strike northern 
France. 
10 — Germans seize Rome. 
11— Allies take Salerno, Italian fleet 

surrenders. 
14— Salamaua falls to U. S. and Aus- 
tralian forces. 
16 — Novorossiisk recaptured by Russians. 
24 — Nazi troops evacuate Corsica. 
28— British tike Foggla. 

October 

1— Allied forces take Naples, 22 days 

after landing at Salerno. 
2— Australian troops capture Jap base 

at Flnschhafen, New Guinea. 
•—Island of Corsica, la Mediterranean, 

la treed of Nazis. 



13— Italy formally declares war on Ger- 
many, by action of Premier Mar- 
shal Badogllo. 

14— In great raid on Schwelnfurt, Ger- 
many, Important ball-bearing fac- 
tories are destroyed, at a cost of 60 
Flying Fortresses. 

28— Melitopol, key city of German de- 
fense in south Ukraine, falls to Rus- 
sians. 

25— Russian troops recapture Dneprope- 
trovsk, important industrial city. 

29— U. S. and New Zealand troops land 
on Treasury Islands, In Northern 
Solomons. 

November 

2— U. S. marines Invade Bougainville is- 
land in northern Solomons. 
4— RAF planes drop more than 2,000 
tons of bombs on Dusseldorf. Ger- 
many. 
6— Kiev, capital of the Ukraine, retaken 

by Russians. 
7— British Eighth army advances in It- 
aly, taking eight towns. 

11— Nazis scuttle ships, blast Installations 
to block harbors of Leghorn and Pes- 
cara. 

13 — Russians capture Zhitomir, important 
rail center of southern front; Chinese 
forces report gains along Yangtze 
river. 

19— Greatest raid In history blasts Ber- 
lin, dropping 2,500 tons. 

23 — Another huge air attack smashes Ber- 
lin. One-fourth of city said to be 
razed. 

Makln island, member of Gilbert 
croup, is taken by U. S. combined 
forces. 

26— Russians rip 37-mlle-wlde gap in 
Nazi lines north of Gomel. 

37 — Marines take Tarawa, one of Gilbert 
islands, after "toughest fighting" In 
their history. 

30— British Eighth army bursts through 
Nazi lines in Italy, approaching Rome. 

December 

1— RAF and U. S. bombers continue 
massive raids, hitting Dusseldorf 
region. 

President Roosevelt meets with 
Churchill and Chiang Kai-shek In 
Cairo, Egypt. Agree to "strip Japan 
of her stolen empire." 
6— Roosevelt, Churchill and Stalin 
meet at Teheran, Iran, reach "com- 
plete agreement on measures to 
crush Germany": U. S. naval task 
force raids Marshall Islands. 
7— Chinese admit loss of Changteh, im- 
portant city in "rice bowl." 
9— Turkey promises Allies all "aid 
snort of war"; Chinese recapture 
Changteh. 

13 — Russian troops regain Initiative In 
Kiev area; British Eighth army 
cracks Nazi line In Italy, captur- 
ing 6.000. 

14— President Roosevelt, returning from 
conferences, visits Malta and Sicily. 

19 — American planes raid Greece; U. S. 
heavy bombers smash Jap base on 
New Britain Island. 

16— Prime Minister Churchill stricken by 
pneumonia; German bombers sink 17 
United Nations merchant ships. 

17— American Sixth army lands at Are- 
we, on New Britain Island, southwest 
Pacific. 




January 



1— President Roosevelt calls for unity 
among Allies, stresses "the supreme 
necessity of planning what is to 
come after the war." 
6— 78th Congress convenes; Samuel 
Rayburn speaker of house for third 
term; Pleasure driving banned In 
eastern states; Fuel oil ration re- 
duced 25 per cent. 

11 — U. S. and Britain relinquish extra- 
territorial rights in China. 

13 — OPA sets corn ceilings st approxi- 
mately $1 a bushel. 

28 — Joint draft system, by which men can 
be inducted into navy, marines and 
coast guard as well as army, an- 
nounced. 



February 



8 — National Income In 1942 was $113.- 

824.000,000 as compared with $94.- 

500.000.000 In 1941. 

9 — Roosevelt orders 48-hour work week 

minimum in labor shortage areas. 

20 — Dried foods rationed, effective 

March 1. 
S3 — Secretary of Agriculture Wlckard 
suspends wheat quotas. 

March 

2 — U. S. and Chile representatives sign 

lend-lease agreement. 
7 — Draft classification "4H" for men 
between 38 and 45 ended. 

11 — Lend-lease extension to July, 1944, 
signed by President. 

24 — Establishment of naval base at Casa- 
blanca announced by navy. 

25— Chester Davis named food chief. 

39— A "critical shortage of doctors is 
developing," an OWI survey reveals. 



April 



8 — President moves to check Inflation 
by executive order freezing wages 
and forbidding war workers to change 
jobs. 

10 — Feed corn celling prices raised from 
$1.02 a bushel to 81.07. 

11— A bill permitting the national debt 
limit to rise to 210 billion dollars. 
and a rider repealing- the $25,000 net 
salary limit becomes law without 
President's signature. 

20— President Roosevelt confers on war 
and postwar problems with Presi- 
dent Camacho of Mexico. 

30 — Soft coal miners of United Mine 
Workers union reject President 
Roosevelt's order; U. S. breaks re- 
lations with Martinique. 



May 



1 — Federal government takes over 

closed coal mines. 
■—President Roosevelt promotes 63 
army officers to rank of general. 

11— Churchill arrives in Washington for 
war conference. . 

13 — Merger between Western Union and 
Postal Telegraph Is announced. 

36 — NLRB approves eight cent an hour 
raise for more than a million non- 
operating railway workers. 

27 — Machinists' union, with 565,000 mem- 
bers, withdraws from the AFL. 

June 

8— United Nations food conference ends. 
7 — Coal miners of the United Mine 

Workers union return to work. 
a— As aftermath of Los Angeles' "zoot 
suit" riots, the entire city Is de- 
clared out of bounds for navy per- 
sonnel. 

10— President signs "pay-as-you-go" in- 
come tax bill. 

31— Riots in Detroit between white and 
colored mobs are suppressed by Fed- 
era} troops, after more than 24 hours 
of disorder. Twenty-nine killed, 700 
Injured; Coal miners strike for third 
time since May 1. 

23— President Roosevelt threatens to 
draft strikers in essential Industries; 
A caudal anesthetic for use in child- 
birth Is reported favorably from 
Baltimore. 

38 — Judge Marvin Jones succeeds Ches- 
ter Davis as War Food Adminis- 
trator. 

SO— Five senators appointed to visit war 
zones and report on U. S. Army and 
Allies; Stocks on New York exchange 
reach a three-year high. 



July 



1 — House rejects amendment to Labor- 
Federal Security bill, thereby cutting 
off funds for National Youth Admin- , 



THEYEAR'STEN 
BIGGEST EVENTS 

SELECTED By: BAUKHAGE 

(WNU Washington Correspondent.) 

I— MILITARY: • 

(a) Russian summer-fall offen- 
sive. 

(b) Pacific offensive (Attu, New 
Guinea, Solomons, Gil- 
berts). 

(c) Italy surrenders. 

(d) Air offensive against Ger- 
man cities. 

n— DIPLOMATIC: 

(a) The four-power conferences 
(Moscow-Cairo-Teheran) . 

(b) Formation of the UNRRA. 

in— DOMESTIC: 

(a) Passage of the Connally 
Resolution. 

(b) Administration moves to 
right (OPA, Food Adminis- 
tration, War Mobilization, 
Stabilization, Economic 
Warfare). 

(e) Republican political gains. 

(dj Congress revolts against an- 
ti-inflation program (sub- 
sidies, reduced tax bill, res- 
olution favoring railroad 
wage increase). 



istration; President Roosevelt gives 
last minute reprieve to Max Stephen, 
sentenced to death for aiding escape 
of a Nazi flyer. 
7 — Gen. Henri Giraud, French com- 
mander of Northwest Africa, arrives 
in Washington. 

19 — The Board of Economic Warfare is 
abolished, and its functions trans- 
ferred to the Reconstruction Finance 
Corporation; Chester Bowles is 
named general manager of the Office 
of Price Administration. 

19— World's largest pipeline, the "Big 
Inch," running from Longvtew, 
Texas, to Phoenixvllle, Pa., Is opened. 

21 — John Lewis, as president of United 
Mine Workers, signs two-year con- 
tract with Illinois Coal Operators 
Association; War Department reveals 
65,058 prisoners of war in country. 

28— Navy asks for more WAVES, stat- 
ing that enrollment must reach 
91,000 by end of 1944; Coffee rationing 
ended by OPA; Blue Network of 
Radio Corporation of America sold. 

August 

2 — Race riot sweeps New York, result- 
ing In death of five negroes, and In- 
juries to 500; Drafting of pre-Pearl 
Harbor fathers set to begin on Oc- 
tober 1. 
6 — June personal Incomes totaled $12,- 
162,000,000, a new record. 

13 — Gasoline ration in Midwest and South- 
west reduced from four to three 
gallons per coupon. 

14 — The War Manpower Commission es- 
tablishes new list of 149 critical oc- 
cupations for first priority In draft 
deferments. 

19 — The army must be raised to 8,200,000 
men by January 1, 1944, and the navy 
to 3,861,000, the War Manpower 
Board announces. 

23— The Guffey Coal Act, passed in 1937, 
to stabilize coal prices, expires. No 
move made to renew It 



September 



2— The exchange ship Gripsholm sails 
with 1,310 Japanese, to be exchanged 
for 1,250 Americans at Goa, Portu- 
gese India; Churchill and Roosevelt 
confer in Washington. 
4— William Jeffers. director of the na- 
tion's rubber program, resigns. 
8 — Churchill asks Anglo-American alli- 
ance. 
7 — Republican Postwar Advisory Coun- 
cil meets at Mackinac Island, Mich. 
8— Drive for 15 billion dollar third war 
loan opened by presidential address. 

14 — Col. William Coleman Is convicted 
by a military court for drunkenness 
and careless use of firearms, de- 
moted to captaincy. 

16— U. S. casualties total 105,205, OWI 
reveals; 20,104 dead, 28,226 wound- 
ed, 32.905 missing. 23,970 prisoners; 
Rep. James Curley, Mass., and five 
others Indicted on charges of having 
accepted retainer fees to obtain war 
contracts. 

17— President Roosevelt reports to Coir- 
gress on Quebec conference. 

20— Army and navy chiefs of staff ask 
full draft quotas, and state delay in 
drafting fathers will prolong war. 

23 — Shoe ration stamp becoming valid 
November 1, must last six months. 

25— Edward Stettlnius Jr. moves from 
lend-lease administrator to succeed 
Sumner Wells as undersecretary of 
state. 

29 — Senators report on war tour. 

October 

4— Treasury asks for ten and a half 

billions in new tax revenue. 
7— Merger of Western Union and Postal 
Telegraph companies Is completed. 

11 — Censorship of weather news is lifted. 

12 — National Labor Relations Board rules 
that labor unions have a moral re- 
sponsibility not to strike in wartime. 

13 — American Federation of Labor votes 
to take United Mine Workers back 
Into fold. 

18 — Third war loan passes goal of 15 bil- 
lion dollars by nearly four billions. 

30 — The 48-hour week for war Industries 
Is extended to 30 more localities. 

22— Zinc-steel pennies are to be discon- 
tinued. Treasury announces. 

28 — Wildcat coal strikes referred to 
President by War Labor Board. 

29 — Jams and jellies are placed on ra- 
tioned list, other items raised, a few 
lowered. 

November 

1— Federal government seizes 3,000 coal 
mines in which strikes are halting 
production. 
2— Elections of various state and na- 
tional officials reveal Republican 
trend. 
3— United Mine Workers ordered to re- 
turn to work as president John Lewis 
accepts new wage agreement, giving 
miners $56.74 for 48-hour week. 
9— Senate votes postwar collaboration 

with other nations, 85 to 8. 
6 — Fifteen non-operating railroad unions 
reject wage Increase offered by emer- 
gency committee; Bernard Baruch la 
appointed chief of a new unit of the 
Office of War Mobilization. 

10 — National Labor Relations Board head 
William Davis says board will adhere 
to wage stabilization program; Her- 
bert Lehman Is appointed director 
general of the United Nations Relief 
and Rehabilitation Administration. 

IS— Interned Japanese at Tule Lake, 
Calif., stage another demonstration; 
U. S. war expenditures from July, 
1940, through October, 1913, total 138 
billion dollars. 

18— Army officials reduce budget by 13 
billion dollars, which sum will revert 
to treasury. 

A subsidy of 100 million dollars is al- 
located to stabilize price of flour. 

30 — January draft call to be twice as 
large as War Manpower commission 
estimated. 

23 — House votes against extension of con- 
sumer subsidies. 



December 



1— Ration values of meats reduced 30 

per cent. 
S— U. S. plane output for November an- 
nounced as 7.789. 
4— Army will retire 25,000 officers, re- 
ducing total to 625,000. 
7— Biggest U. S. battleship, the 45,000- 
ton Wisconsin, is launched. 
10— Non-operating rail workers get sen- 
ate approval for eight cent per hour 
raise. 
11— Senate military committee plans 
graduated discharge pay for service- 
men, ranging from 8200 to 1500. 
16— President Roosevelt returns to capi- 
tal; senate committee votes to retain 
food subsidies for 60 days. 
17— OPA promises lowering of meat ra- 
tion points. 




January 

1— New Year's Day football results: 
Rose Bowl— Georgia 9, U. C. L. A. 0; 
Sugar Bowl— Tennessee 14, Tulsa 7; 
Orange Bowl— Alabama 37, Boston 
College 21; Cotton Bowl— Texas 14, 
Georgia Tech 7; Sun Bowl— Second 
Air Force 13, Hardln-Simmons 7; 
Kazar Stadium— East All-Stars 13, 
West All-Stars 12. 

17— Ted Williams, formerly of Boston 
Red Sox, named "player of the year." 

31— Dodgers sign Cooney, Waner, Sisler; 
Yankees get Nick Etten. 

February 

30— William Cox, New York sportsman, 
purchases Philadelphia- Phillies for 
about 8230,000 from National League. 

24— Bijcky Harris signs to manage Phil- 
adelphia ball club. 

Marcb 

13— Greg Rice runs fastest 2 miles at 

K. of C. meet. In 8:52.7. 
17— Philadelphia team wins the Golden 
■^ Gloves championship in New York. 
18 — Detroit wins national hockey league 

title. 
20— Cornelius Warmerdam sets new pole 

vault record of 19 feet, B'i Inches. 



April 



8— Detroit Red Wings defeat the Boston 
Bruins, 2-0 to capture the Stanley 
Cup. 



May 



1— Count Fleet wins Kentucky Derby, 

In 2:04. 
8— Count Fleet wins Preakness, in 1:57.2. 
21 — Bob Montgomery outpoints Beau 
Jack to gain lightweight title. 

June 

20— Gunder Hagg outruns Greg Rice to 

win 5,000 meter race. 
26— Francisco Segura wins Nat'l Col- 

legiate tennis title, defeating Tom 

Brown Jr. 
28— Whlrlaway, 8 year old race horse, 

retired. * 

July 

2— Patty Berg defeats Dorothy Kirby 
for Women's Western Open Golf 
Championship. 

10— Gunder Hagg establishes 8:93.9 
American record for 3 miles. 

13— American League team wins annual 
All-Star game, 5 to 3. 

36— Harold McSpaden defeats Buck 
Whitney by 1 stroke to win Ail-Ameri- 
can golf title; Patty Berg takes 
women's title. . 



August 



8— Ryder Cup golf team, captained by 
Craig Wood, defeats Walter Hagen's 
team. 

8— Howard Schenken wins the contract 
bridge master's championship for 
fifth time. 
29— College All-Stars defeat the Wash- 
ington Redskins, professional football 
champions, 27-7. 



4— Explosion and fire in munitions plant 

at Elkton, Md., kills 13 ard Injures 

60. 

19 — A tornado injures about 200 men, 

and destroys 41 buildings valued at 

4175,000 at Fort Riley, Kan. 
preadlng floods in Mississippi val- 
ley take twelve lives, and leave 
108,000 homeless. 
24— Death toll In flooded region of lower 
Mississippi valley reaches 17, and 
160,000 are estimated to be without 
shelter. 

June 

8— Navy reports 84 men killed when sn 
ammunition ship collides with tanker 
off Port Arthur, Tex. 

July 

22— Maj. Gen. William Upshur, Capt 
Charles Paddock, both U. S. M. C. 
officers, and four other persons are 
killed in Navy plane crash near 
Sitka, Alaska. 

27— Three soldiers who became lost In 
desert maneuvers near Yuma, Ariz., 
die of thirst 

28 — Hurricane sweeping over Texas Gulf 
coast kills 13 persons. Damage esti- 
mated at 10 million dollars. 



August 



1— Ten persons. Including Mayor Wil- 
liam Baker and Maj. William Robert- 
son, die when Army glider crashes 
in demonstration flight In St. Louis. 
3— Five Negroes killed, more than 500 
white and colored Injured in race 
rioting In New York city's Harlem 
district. 
8— Fourteen persons are- drowned In a 
"flash" flood in central West Vir- 
ginia. 

28 — Twenty-one miners are killed In gas 
explosion at Sayreton, Ala. 

30— Twenty-nine persons are killed and 
150 Injured in wreck of crack Dela. 
ware, Lackawanna and Western R. 
R. train near Wayland, N. Y. 

September 

6 — Eighty persons killed and 177 injured, 
when Congressional Limited of the 
Pennsylvania R. R. is derailed near 
Philadelphia. 
7— Twentieth Century Limited train of 
New York Central R. R. is derailed 
near Canastota, N. Y., killing three; 
Houston, Tex., hotel fire takes lives 
of 50 men. 

17— Explosion of depth charges at the 
Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Va., takes 
25 lives. About 250 are Injured. 

20— Twenty-five soldiers die when Army 
transport plane crashes near Max- 
ton, N. C. 

October 

16 — Crash of airliner 47 miles west of 
Nashville, Tenn., takes 10 lives. 

23— Navy announces that 88 seamen died 
when two tankers collided off Palm 
Beach. 

November 

33— Six children die in farm home Ore 
near Chicago. 

December 

13— Twenty marines killed, 29 injured In 
Hawaii when collision of navy planes 
releases bomb. 

16— Sixty-nine killed, 50 Injured in colli- 
sion of two fast trains near Buie, 
N. C. Forty-eight of the dead were 
servicemen. 




January 



September 



6— Lieut. Joseph Hunt takes the nation- 
al amateur tennis championship. 

18— The St. Louis Cardinals defeat the 
Chicago Cubs, 2-1, clinching the Na- 
tional league pennant'. % 

19— Detroit Lions beat the Chicago Card- 
inals In professional football opener. 

29— The New York Yankees take the 
American League pennant for the 
14th time. v . * 

October 

3— Final baseball standings: St Louis 
Cardinals, won 105, lost 49, for a 
percentage of .682. The New York 
Yankees won 98, lost 56, for a per- 
centage of .636. 
8— Columbus, O., American Association 
team, defeats Syracuse. N. Y., In- 
ternational league team, to capture 
"little world series" title. 

10— Yankees win World Series, defeating 
Cardinals, four games to one. 

24— Ossle Bluege signs two-year contract 
to manage Washington Senators, and 
Leo Durocher signs to run Dodgers 
in 1944. 

November 

2— Stanley Musial, St. Louis Cardinal 
outfielder, named most valuable play- 
er In National League. 
9— Spurgeon Chandler, New York Yan- 
kees pitcher, chosen most valuable 
In American League. 

14— U. of Southern California and the U. 
of Washington chosen for Rose Bowl. 

19— Beau Jack regains lightweight title, 
outpointing Bob Montgomery. 

27 — Great Lakes defeats Notre Dame (19- 
14) in year's biggest football upset 

December 

12 — Chicago Bears win western pro foot- 
ball championship. 

13— Ned Day regains title as All-Star 
National Bowling champion. 




January 

8 — Fire kills six and Injures 100 in Chi- 
cago bpwling alley. 

21 — Thirty-five Americans die when a 
transport plane crashes in the jungle 
near Surinam. Dutch Guiana. 

36— Brig. Gen. Carlyle Wash and nine 
other army men die in an army 
transport plane that came down near 
Flomaton, Ala. 

SI— Twenty-eight" persons die In sanitar- 
ium fire In Seattle. 

February 

11— Eighteen lose lives when a Liberator 
bomber crashes in Newfoundland. 

18— Twenty-eight die when four engine 
bomber crashes aflame into a pack- 
ing plant In Seattle, Wash. < 

33— Yankee Clipper crashes and sinks In 
Tagus river, Lisbon, Portugal. 

March 

2— Nineteen bodies recovered in coal 
mine disaster at Bear Creek, Mont 
21 — Flood waters spread over a wide 
area in Georgia, Mississippi, .Ala- 
bama and Louisiana. About 3,500 
persons removed by Red Cross. 

April 

13— Omaha airport and village of Carter 

Lake, Iowa, flooded when Missouri 

river dikes break. 
19 — Seven Sea Scouts drowned, and 

three missing, when cabin cruiser 

founders off Long Wand. 



9 — Famed Negro scientist, Dr. George 

Washington Carver, 78. 
6— President emeritus of Harvard U., 

Dr. Abbott L. Lowell, 86. 
10— "Message to Garcia" hero, Col. An- 
drew S. Rowan, 85: 
23— Alexander Woollcott, 56, "The Town 
Crier" of radio, author, critic, play- 
wright, actor. 

February 

7— Dr. Attilio H. Giannlnl, 68. physician, 
banker, motion picture executive, 
civic leader. 
19 — Lynn Overman, 55, comedian. 

March 

10— Poet and author Stephen Vincent 

Benet, 44, Pulitzer prize winner with 

"John Brown's Body." 
20 — Former governor of Illinois, Frank 

O. Lowden, 82. 
28 — James A. Farrell, 80, president of 

the United States Steel corp. 



April 



22 — Luren D. Dickinson, 84, former gov- 
ernor of Michigan, foe of "high life." 

28— Maj. Gen. -Robert Olds, 46, com- 
mander of the U. S. Second Army Air 
Force. 



May 



11— Maj. Gen. Stephen O. Fuqua, 68, chief 
of infantry In U. S. Army, 1928-32. 

20— Adm. Henry A. Wiley, 76, Pacific 
fleet commander, 1927-29. 

26— Edsel B. Ford, 49, president of Ford 
Motor Co. 



June 

4— Maj. Kermlt Roosevelt, 53, son of 
the former President, on active duty 
In Alaska. 

16— Dr. Albert Bushnell Hart, noted his- 
torian and Harvard U. professor, 
at 88. 

23— Rear Adm. Neil E. Nichols, 63, for- 
mer commandant of Boston Navy 
Yard. 

July 

14— Actress Beverly Sltgreaves, 76. 
27— Rev. Ernest Lynn Waldorf, 67, bishop 

of the Methodist church, Chicago 

area. 
29— Opera star Marie Gay Zanatello, 64. 

August 

1— President of China, Lin Sen, 79, 

scholar and artist 
19— Lieut. Gen. William M Wright, 79. 

commander of two divisions in world 

War I. 
21— Dr. William Lyon Phelps, 78, of 

Yale university. 

September 

6— Former ambassador to Poland, John 
C Cudahy, 55. 

9— Rear Adm. Walton Sexton, 66, for- 
mer chairman of the Navy General 

21— British Chancellor of the Exchequer, 
Sir Klngsley Wood, 62. 

October 

6— Patrick Nash, 80. political leader of 
Democrats in Cook County, Til. 

11— Samuel H. Church, 85, president, Car- 
negie Institute. 

20— Ben Bernle, 52, band leader. 

November . ( 

9— Dr. Jesse O. Bullowa, developer of 

Sneumonla serum, at 64. 
,ep. J. W. O. Her (R.— Perm.). 
22— Rep. H. B. SteagaU (D.— Ala.). 

December 

13— Marvin Mclntyre, 68, for 20 years 
secretary to President Roosevelt, at 
Washington. 

16— E. C "Billy" Hayes, 89. well-known 
track coach of Indiana U.; the Rev. 
Dr. William A. Brown, 77, Presby- 
terian minister, one of founders of 
World Council of Churches. 
Released by Western Newspaper Union. 



\ 




5 xrttr&'&m* 



' 



COAL STRIKES] 





GUADALCANAL 




FATHERS' DRAFT 




The year drew to a close with 

these important events: 

December 

1— Roosevelt, Churchill, Chiang 
Kai-shek pledge to strip Japan 
of imperialistic gains. 

Exchange ship Gripsholm ar- 
* rives with 1,223 American re- 
patriates from Far East. 

2— Fathers' draft bill delays dar- 
ing absence of President. 

16— President Roosevelt returns to 
America following Ave weeks' 
diplomatic trip. 

17— Army announces successful 
landing on Japanese base ia 
New Britain. 



I»- <*• A- ft- ft-ft-ft.<». ft- ft- (I. ft. p. iv. rv. ft- ft. ft. ft. 

I ASK MC 9 I 

? 



ANOTHER { I 

I A General Quiz 



? 
? 

<t- <\- fv. cv. tv. fv. rv. p.. fv. fv. o~ cv. fv. o~ fv. fv. fv. fv, |W . 

The Question* 

1. What is the name of the fabu- 
lous animal with one horn in the 
center of its forehead? . 

2. Was Sitting Bull a war chief? 

3. What President of the United 
States served the briefest term of 
office? s 

4. What dogs are allowed meat 
rations? 

5. A proposition to which peo- 
ple in general agree is called 
what? 

6. According to the Bible by 
what method did Gideon choose his 
warriors? 



The Answers 



1. Unicorn. 

2. Sitting Bull in reality was a 
medicine man and never a war 
chief. 

3. William Henry Harrison, who 
died after serving one month. 

4. "Seeing eye" dogs. Blind per- 
sons- using such dogs may obtain 
up to 12 extra points weekly. 

5. An axiom. ' 

0. By- their method of drinking 
water (Judges 7:5, 6). 




WHITE PETROLEUM JELLY 



When to Be Silent 

If it requires great tact to know 
how to speak to the purpose, it re- 
quires no less to know when to be 
silent.— La Rochefoucauld. 



Millions have used— 

PAZO si; PILES 

Relieves pain and soreness 



There'll good reason why PAZO oint- 
ment has been used by ao many millions 
of sufferers from simple Files. First. 
PAZO ointment soothes inflamed areas 
— relieves pain and itching. Second, 
PAZO ointment lubriratea hardened, 
dried parts— helps prevent cracking and 
soreness. Third, PAZO ointment lends 
to reduce swelling and check bleeding. 
Fourth, it's easy to use. PAZO oint- 
ment's perforated Pits Pipe makes ap- 
plication simple, thorough. Your doctor 
can tell you about PAZO ointment. 



Get PAZO Today! At Drugstores' 



Portable X-Ray 

The army's portable X-ray can 
be assembled in six minutes and 
will locate foreign matter in 40 sec- 
onds. 



RHEUMATIC PAIN 

■tee sit Spoil T.ir On— c.t iftar it is* 
Don't pnt off getting: C-2223 to re- 
lieve pain of muscular rheumatism 
and other rheumatic pains. Caution: 
Use only as directed. First bottle 
purchase price back if not satisfied. 
60c and $1.00. Today, buy C-2223. 



Cranes Hold Nuptial Dances 

In March, male and female 
sandhill cranes congregate in 
clearings and hold nuptial dances. 



AT FIRST 
SUMQFA 



c 



v 66o 



USE 

6*6 TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE MOPS 



Women Wear Nose Rings 

Noble women of Upper India 
wear huge nose rings, some of 
which are as large as their heads. 



SNAPPY FACTS 

ABOUT 

RUBBER 




Crude, or natural, rubber has 
been defined as a substance 
found as liquid latex in many 
types of trees and plants and 
being characterised by the 
physical qualities of stretch, 
bounce, and Impermeability 
to water. 

In 1939 crude rubber was Hie 
most Important single commodity 
Imported Into the United States on 
a dollar basis. Gross Imports then 
were 499,616 long tons, valued 
at $178,489,142. 

A small test plat of land la 
■ Pacific Coast experimental 
project last year produced at 
^ the rata of SO pounds of rub- 
ber par acre) from 
dandelion. ^- 



Jp**p V jZm*~ 



I%wmm peace 



jREGoodrich 



F,R STIN RUBBER 



sr.i)|g7 






WJI 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1944 



CONCORD 



Arise and bless the Lord, ye 
people of his choice; arise and 
bless the Lord your God with 
heart, soul and voice. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Kannady 
have been entertaining their 
grandson last week, Sunday his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Kan- 
nady came for him and spent the 
day. Sleet Alphin and children 
were there also in the afternoon. 



Mr. and Mrs. Glen Webster and 
baby of Falmouth were the week 
end guests here of their parents. 

Misses Beulah and Nina Jane 
Glacken of Erlanger spent the 
holidays with their parents Mr. 
and Mrs. Will Glacken. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Chapman, 
and daughter, Mrs. Vivie Webster 
and son Leo all spent Tuesday at 
Walton with Mr. and Mrs. O. J. 
Struve and children. 

Mrs. Hobert Speagle and baby' 



Public Sale 

t 

Having decided to quit farming, I will sell the 
following personal property at the Elmore Farm, 
Dixie Highway, North of Walton, on 



T 




. JAN. 13 th 



Beginning at 1 O'Clock (CWT) 



1 Black Mare; 1 Grey Horse; 1 Weanling Colt; 1 
Guernsey Cow, fresh, extra nice; 1 Jersey Cow, 
calf just sold ; 1 Guernsey Cow, will freshen April ; 
1 White Face Cow, fresh, 1st calf; 1 White Face 
Heifer, bred ; 2 Jersey-Guernsey Heifers ; 1 O. I. C. 
Brood Sow; 6 O. I. C. Shoats; 3 Fat Hogs; 1 Sled; 
1 Mowing Machine; 1 Rake; A Lot of Harness and 
Small Tools; 1 Land Plow; and some Household 
Furniture and some Hay. 

TERMS CASH 

DAISY V. HILL 

OWNER 
Harry F. Johnson, Auctioneer Ben Doan, Clerk 



COLONIAL 

COAL & SUPPLY COMPANY 

47 DIXIE HIGHWAY ERLANGER, KY. 

call DIXIE 7720 for 

Wayne Feeds — Red Jacket Coal 

Concrete Blocks — Ready Mixed Concrete 



have had the flu, we miss them 
from churph. 

The farmers are stripping and 
delivering tobacco, it is bringing 
a good price. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Rex and 
children of Ludlow spent Christ- 
mas here with their parents. 

Carl Jones and wife of N. C. 
visited their parents here last 
week, he returned to service Fri- 
day night. . 

The W. M. S. will meet with 
Bertha Chapman the second Wed- 
nesday in January, all members 
are urged to be present, any visit- 
ors welcome, lets all start the New 
Year right. — 

Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Chapman 
and family entertained Sunday 
for Mr. and Mrs. Herbert King 
and daughter-in-law, Mrs. Helen 
King of Latonia, Mr. and Mrs 
Harry Chapman and grandaugh- 



ter, Nola Rose of Verona, Mr. and 
Mrs. O. J. Struve and boys, Terry 
Neil and Ronald J. of Walton, 
Mrs. Katheleen Webster was there 
Friday r\ight and Saturday. 

The big snow that fell the first 
of last week is going off with a 
rain. The rain was badly needed — 
las water is scarce. 

Bro. Smith has planned to 
bring the youn& preacher this 
Sunday to preach at Concord, he 
was to bring him a few weeks ago 
and couldn't , so come out and 
hear this young man as our pastor 
reports him to be fine. 



Keep on Backing; the Attack 
with yonr purchases of WAR 
BONDS. Give War Bonds 
for Christmas. 




Your Valentine Photo 

Keep your image close to him 
in the lonely hours on a far- 
away front — send your -smiling 
Valentine Photograph, made in 
our modern studio. Come in 
today. 

SERVICE PHOTO 
STUDIO 

804 Madison Ave., Covington 

STUDIO HOURS: 

11 A. M. to 9 P. M. Daily 

Sundays, 1 to 5 P. M. 



REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 

6-Room cottage with 4 acres of 
ground, garage, chicken house 
and smoke house, located on 
Beaver Road. 

9-Room house, garage, city water, 
electric, modern, newly repair- 
ed and painted, located in north 
Walton. 

One farm — 40 acres, located 1 mile 
from Walton. 

5-Room cottage in Walton, one 
acre ground. 

6-Room house with 12 acres, good 
improvements. 
Also 4 good dairy cows. 
A. C. JOHNSON 

Tel. 125 Walton, Ky. 



KEEP ON 

' WITH WAR BONDS • 

********** **• 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



Classified advertising rate — le 
per word — 25c minimum. 
Cash, check or stamps should ac- 
company all orders. 



RADIO REPAIRS at reasonable 
rates. Colonial 1121. 509 Scott 
Street. tt-lt 



NOTICE— Pure Drinking Water 
Hauled anywhere — anytime 
. Call Walton 423. Jas. E. Falls. 
tf-47 



NEW JAMES 
THEATRE 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 

SHOW EACH AND EVERY N1TE 
AT 7:30 CENTRAL WAR TIME. 
SUNDAY MATINEE AT 2:30 
CENTRAL WAR TIME. BAR- 
GAIN NIGHTS MONDAY AND 
THURSDAY. 



All children regardless of age 
most have a ticket for each show. 
No parking allowed west of side- 
walk in front of Theatre or filling 
station adjoining. Police Orders. 



#8" FIRST 
VGN0FA 

c 



w 666 



USE 
§66 TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DROPS 




W. E. TAIT, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 

Specializing in the 

correction and 

protection of 

EYESIGHT 



Lena Horn - Bill Robinson - Cab 
Calloway Orchestra in 

STORMY WEATHER 

FRI. & SAT., JANUARY 7-8th 

Tyrone Power - Anne Baxter 
Dana Andrews in 

CRASH DIVE 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 9th 



Johnny Mack Brown - Fuzzy 
Knight in 

LONE STAR TRAIL 

MONDAY, JANUARY 10th 



WANTED TO BUY— Used fur- 
niture, good and bad; atniques; 
coins; old glassware; old pic 
tures; books and buttons. John 
Stubblefield. Walton, Ky., R. 2. 
Phone 495. 6t-45* 



MAYTAG WASHER— Parts and 
repairing. Wm. Hagedorn, 856 
Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Ky. 
tf-49 



20 YEARS in radio servicing. W. 
M. STEPHENSON, Radio spec- 
ialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Coving- 
ton. COIonlal 1121. tf-10 



FOR SALE— Large Circulating, 
Parlor Type Coal Heater. James 
Allen, So. Walton. Ph. 154. 4t5 



WANTED — Stock sheep, most any 
kind. J. W. Eckler, Williams- 
town, Ky., Ph. 4084. 4t-5* 



W A N T E D— A capable house- 
keeper, must like children. 
Address reply to Walton Adver- 
tiser, Dept. W., Walton, Ky. tf5 



FOR SALE— One white Shorthorn 
Bull and 4 shoats. M. J. Crouch, 
Walton, R. R. 1, on Walton- 
Verona Rd. 2t-6* 



WANTED TO RENT— S mall 
house in Walton, 3 or 4 rooms. 
Convenient to school. Call Wal- 
ton 32. lt-7 



TENANT WANTED— For 4 acres 
tobacco, 5 or 6 acres corn. Team, 
all tools and house furnished. 
Call Saturday evening or Sun- 
day morning. T. T. Thomas, 
Walton, Ky., R. 2, Phone Wal- 
ton 591X. 2t-7* 



WANTED— Housekeeper, white or 
colored to stay at the home. 
Childrens care, no laundry. 
$8.00 a week. Mrs. Edith Haney, 
Stephenson Mill Road, Walton, 
Ky. lt-7» 



27 E. 7th St. 

COVINGTON. KY. 

Hours 9:30 a. m. to 
5:30 p. m. 



Evenings by appointment 
Phone HE. 2088 



Women fighting for a love the law 
would deny them 

CITY WITHOUT MEN 

with 
Linda Darnell - Glenda Farrell 

Leslie Brooks 

TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY 

January 11th and 12th 



Allan Jones - Jane Frazee - Glora 
i *> Jean in 

WHEN JOHNNY COMES 
MARCHING HOME 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 13th 



WE ARE NOW TAKING ORDERS FOR 
BABY CHICKS 

We Sell Dr. Salsbury's Poultry Remedies, Poultry 
Feeders, Water Founts, Etc. 

FUL-O-PEP FEED STORE 



512 PDXE STREET 
COVINGTON, 

KY. ' ' 



1 Nltion-widt POULTRY 
'.HFALTH SERVICE . 



HEMLOCK 9168 

Open Sundays Till 

Noon 



**=;■. 




From where I sit 

ly Joe Marsh 



Roy Sims showed me a mighty 
Interesting folder the other day. 

"It's got a jaw-breakin' title" 
he said, "but there's plenty o' 
meat in it if you'll read it. 

It was called "The Army and 
Navy Cooperation Program of the 
Brewing Industry Foundation." 

But when I got into it, I found 
the job the brewers are doing is 
even bigger than that name. 

Even before the National 
Selective Service act went into 
afreet, the brewers had started 
this program in Kentucky. 

Boiled down, its purpose is to 
wo A with military officials, the 



Public Health Service and others, 
to see that licensed beef retailers 
around our army camps main- 
tain high standards of operation. 

From where I sit, the brewers 
are doing a whale of a job. Just 
look at the improved conditions 
at Gamp Breckinridge, and 
Camp Campbell alone 1 

And from what army folks say 
about it, this cooperative pro- 
gram is one of the good things 
that's come out of this war. 



^#U« 




LOST — A ring of keys, between 
Walton and Dry Ridge. Finder 
please leave keys at Advertiser 
Office. 



FOR SALE— Horses: Work mares 
and Weanling Colts; straw; 
good Iron Wheel Farm Wagon; 
and Child's Large All-Chore 
Wagon. John W. Conrad, 32 
Edwards Ave., Ph. 517, Walton, 
Ky. lt-7 



FOR SALE— Home Comfort 
Range in good condition — Price 
$40.00. Mrs. s. W. Durr, Green 
Road, Phone Ind. 6314. It7* 



FOR RENT— One of the best 
tobacco farms in Carroll Co. 
with interest in sheep, beef, and 
dairy cattle. Come in and talk it 
over. Mrs. S. G. Tilton, Gent, 
Ky 4t-7* 



FOR SALE— Six room house, In 
good condition, with electric 
and water in the house, good 
garden space. Located on High 
School Court. Raymond Gross, 
Phone Florence 8503 W. 2t-7 



POR SALE— 150 barrel corn. C. B. 
Norman, 26 South Main St., 
Walton, Ky. 3t-7* 




*V» Is For 
Vision 

Everybody has a part In the 
drive for VICTORY. Good eye- 
sight Is of vital Importance. Eye 
strain and defective vision keeps 
a person below normal, when It 
Is his or her patriotic duty to feel 
as well and strong as possible. 

Come in today and have your 
eyes examined.- 

FRANK RIGGS 

Optometrist 
Pike * Rtuaell Covington, Ky. 




Any time you are conveniently near our funeral 
home, pay us a visit. If will be a privilege to show 
you through, and you will learn much about the 
facilities offered by our establishment. 



This is a standing invitation; 
leisure. 



accept it at your 



CHAMBERS & GRUBBS 

Funeral Directors Phone Walton 352 



OR SALE— 28 pigs, about 7 
weeks old, weight about 40 lbs. 
each. J. M. Cockrell, Indepen- 
dence, R. 1 on Harris Pike, Ph. 
Ind. 5031 W. 2t-6* 



WANTED TO RENT— Cash or 
share, 50 acres or better. Can 
furnish own team and tools. 
Mr. Harry V. Lorentz, Route 
1, Florence, Ky. 4t-7 



USED CARS-20 EAST FOURTH ST. 

Covington COlonial 3884 

1936 Cadillac $325 

1939 Hudson 4-door ; $695 

1936 Chevrolet Sedan, new paint $275 

1938 Oldsmobile Sedan ... $445 

1941 Plymouth 4-door Sedan ...... $875 

1937 Ford Coupe $295 

1937 Chrysler Sedan .. $295 

1936 Nash Sedan ... $265 

1939 Dodge 4-door Sedan $695 

1936 Packard Sedan __ $275 

1937 Packard Coupe . $345 

1936 Chevrolet Sedan $245 

1937 Plymouth Sedan _ $350 

1938 Willys Sedan $325 

1937 Willys Sedan $275 

65 MORE FROM $60 UP 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 



NO PRIORITIES 

ARE NEEDED FOR FARM TOOLS WELDED 

R. Michels Welding 
\ Company 

722 Washington St. Covington COlonial 0670 



DEAD STOCK REMOVED FREE 

For Prompt Removal of Horses and Cows 

CALL VALLEY 0887 

WE PAY 'PHONE CHARGES 

Ky. Dead Animal Disposal Co. 



LOCKLAND 



OHIO 



m'S&wtom 





Walton Perpetual Bldg. & Loan Assn. 

DIXIE STATE BANK BLDG. WALTON, KY. 

E. S. West, Sec"* A. M. Edwards, 

— SEMI-ANNUAL DIVIDENDS 



-REGISTERED JERSEYS- 
WHY SELECTIVE REGISTRATION? 

Improves Jersey Breed: By helping Jersey Breeders 
to cull bulls that have no evidence of real promise 
to transmit production. 

HEED T B AND BANG TESTED 

S, WHITEHOUSE OUNLAP • FARM 

L. C. Fish, Herdsman, Richwood, Ky., U. S. No. 25 



Universe of Ky. Ubrmrr 
LEXINGTON KY 



43' 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



— NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER — 
Devoted To the Interest of Boone, Kenton, Gallatin and Grant Counties — Kenton-Campbell Courier Consolidated With the Advertiser 



Subscription $1.50 Per Year In Advance 



/ 



WALTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, January is, 1944 




TO 



V*4 



VOLUME 30— NUMBER 8 



County Farmers 
Schedule Ten 
Planning Meetings 



Boone County farmers will hold 
ten Community Agriculture Plan 
ning meetings during the next two 
weeks according to H. R. Forkner, 
County Agent. Farmers at these 
meetings will outline the local 
agricultural improvement work 
they consider important during 
1944. The community improve- 
ment programs will be coordinat- 
ed thru a county committee com- 
posed of the chairmen of the 
community group. 

The schedule of the meetings 
are as follows: 

Verona - Bank - Saturday, Jan. 
18th at 1:15 p. m.; Hamilton - 
School Building - Saturday, Jan. 
15th at 7:30 r p."m.; Grant- School 
Building - Monday, Jan 17th at 
7:30 p. m.; Constance - School 
Building - Thursday, Jan. 20th at 
8:00 p. m.; Walton - Basement 
Room Bank - Friday, Jan. 21st at 
7:30 p. m.; Petersburg - School 
Building - Monday, Jan. 24th at 
:30 p. m.; Burlington - County 
Agent's Office - Tuesday, Jan. 
25th at 7:30 p. m.; Florence 
Town Hall - Saturday, Jan. 29th 
at 8:00 p. m.; New Haven - School 
Building - Monday, Jan. 31st at 
7:30 p. m. 

These meetings held each year 
are both helpful a*jk interesting. 
Heading farmers attending the 
meetings give their past years ex- 
periences in agricultural improve- 
ment and a recommended pro- 
gram is planned for the new year. 

All farmers interested in the 
agricultural improvement work in 
their communities and the county 
are invited to attend. 



Nathan E. Northeutt Promoted 
To Hospital Apprentice 
Second Class. 



Great Lakes, HI., January 7— A 
promotion to the rate of Hospital 
Apprentice second class was 
granted to Bluejacket Nathan E. 
Northeutt, Jr., 18, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. N. E. Northeutt, 12 Need- 
more St., Walton, Ky., in recent 
graduation ceremonies at the 
Hospital Corps School at the U. S. 
Naval Hospital here. 

Graduation terminates a six- 
w e e k course of preliminary 
training at the Hospital Corps 
School. Included in the course is 
the study of anatomy and phy- 
siology, hygiene and sanitation, 
materia-medica and weights and 
measures, first aid and bandaging, 
nursing, trnsportation of casulties 
and dietetics. 

The newly graduated man will 
continue to train at another Naval 
hospital before being sent to duty 
at sea or at another shore station. 



NOTICE— 



Cpl. Nicholas T. Welsh Jr., son 
of Mr. and Mrs. N. T. Welsh is 
home on a furlough from Kelly 
Field, Texas. A family dinner was 
given In his honor on Sunday. 
Those present were: Rev and Mrs. 
Geo. Caroland, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. 
Harris and Miss Betty Lou Harris 
of Ft. Thomas, Mrs. Louise Cun- 
ningham of Dayton, Ohio and the 
host and hostess. 





OCCUPATIONAL TAX 


. 


All occupational tax for the 
year 1944 is now. due and pay- 
able at the City Hall. 


** , 


' R. E. BRUGH, 

Tax Collector. 



The W. S. C. S. Local Division 
(Ladies Aid Society) of the Wal- 
ton Methodist Church will meet 
with Mrs. Carrie Rouse Saturday, 
January 15th in an all-day meet- 
ing. 

BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH 



Sunday School at 10:00 a.-m.. 
(CWT), Harry Rouse, Supt. 

Morning Worship at 11 :00 a. m., 
(CWT). 

B. T. U. at 7:00 p. m., (CWT). 

Evening Worship at 7:45 p. m., 
(CWT). 

Services each Sunday. You are 
cordially invited to worship with 
us 



George Mosby Harrison 



Funeral services for George 
Mosby Harrison, Big Bone farmer 
were conducted from Big Bone 
Baptist Church Sunday, January 
9th at 2 p. m. with Rev. Roy 
Johnson, former pastor in charge. 

Mr. Harrison passed away Fri- 
day from a heart ailment. 

Interment was in Big Bone 
Cemetery. 

His widow, Mrs. Mary Harrison 
and one son, Pvt. Wm. E. Harri- 
son survive. 

Chambers and Grubbs were 
charge of the arrangements. 



in 



Labor Program 
Assist In Placing 
320 Workers 



The Boone County farm labor 
program has assisted local far- 
mers in securing 350 placements 
of farm workers since January 1st 
1943 according to W. M. Smith, 
County Farm Labor Assistant. 

The placements have included 
a wide variety of jobs varing from 
day workers, month hands and 
tenants to the securing of custom 
machinery and job contract work. 
The farm labor program has been 
extended thru January and until 
further notice. Present indications 
are that many farmers may en- 
counter a more severe labor short- 
age in 1944 than during the past 
year. 

The securing and placement of 
farm tenants has been the most 
important farm labor job the past 
thirty days. A large number of 
farmers have been assisted in this 
work. 

Farmers who have not secured 
tenants for 1944 are advised to do 
so at the earliest possible date. 
Tenants who must move should 
oomplete their arrangements as 
soon as possible. The fewer the 
tenant moves the better for the 
war effort. Tenant moves are ex- 
pensive and usually both the land- 
lord and tenant experience con- 
siderable expense when moves are 
made. Often after the moves are 
made both parties see where the 
move could have been avoided. 

Farmers who need tenants and 
tenants who must move are in- 
vited to contact the farm labor 
assistant at the county agent's 
office. A list of available tenants 
and available farms are on file 
there. 




To the People 
of this Community 

KILL OR BE KILLED 

United States Marines paid the 
stiffest price in human life per 
square yard for the capture of 
Tarawa, vital Pacific outpost 
It was kill or be killed. Your 
boys did not 
flinch when 
they ran into 
the deadliest 
fire power 
along the 
beaches of 
this impor- 
tant Gilbert 
Island strong- 
hold. 

This assault, bloody and cost- 
ly, is one of the many which 
must be made before Tokyo and 
Berlin are pounded into dust and 
ashes. 

What are y»u doing to back up 
the boys? Remember these are 
boys from this very community, 
perhaps from your very home. 
Any home in your neighborhood 
which today does not display the 
Treasury's- red, white and blue 
4th War Loan Shield proclaim- 
ing "We bought Extra War 
Bonds" is not backing the at- 
tack. Every Extra War Bond 
you buy becomes a direct fighter 
against Japan and Germany. If 
you could but see one man die 
on the battlefield, you would not 
count the cost of your slight sac- 
rifices to buy Extra War Bonds 
to make each succeeding assault 
less costly in the lives of our 
boys. 4 

You can't afford NOT to buy 
Extra Bonds in the 4th War Loan 
if you would help these boys,* 
THE EDITOR. 



Kentucky Boy 
Weds Scotland Girl 



Mr. and Mrs. Harold Menke of 
Dayton, Ohio were guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Louis Schwab and 
daughters over the week-end. 



Woman's Missionary Society 



CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Walton, Ky. • 



Geo. S. Caroland, Minister 
Church School 10:00 a. m. 

Helen Ruth Gardiner, Supt. 
Worship, Lord's Supper 11:00 a. m. 
Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 



Tjou may need new) (jlasse? 




By us to all whose vision is not 
what it should be. Start the New 
Year right and take care of your 
eyes NOW. . 



The Woman's Misionary Society 
of the Walton Baptist Church 
will meet in the church, Wednes- 
day, January 19th for their re- 
gular monthly meeting. Business 
session at 11 o'clock, with Mrs. 
Wm. Soden, president, in the 
chair. 

Covered dish lunch at noon and 
social hour. Program at 1 :30 with 
Mrs. Margaret Wilson as leader. 
Topic for the month, "Character- 
istics of the Citizens of the King- 
dom."" 



Sam Morris, Voice of Temper- 
ance will broadcast Sunday, at 
12:45, C. W. T. from WHAS, 
Louisville. If you love your boys 
and girls in service listen to this 
broadcast without fail. — Public- 
ity Reporter. 



DR. J. O. TYSON 

Optometrist 
OFFICES WITH 

MOTCH 

Optician — Jewelers 



613 MADISON AVE. 

Established 1857 



COVINGTON, KY. 



Training Class 
Held For County 
Homemakers 






Homemakers attending the 
clothing training class in Burling- 
ton last week were told they could 
do most of their spring shopping 
at home in the clothes closet or 
where ever their unused clothing 
is kept. Clothing leaders studied 
"Mending and Patching" and 
handmade clothing accessories. 
Only five clubs were able to send 
representatives due to the bad 
weather. 

The morning was* devoted to a 
study of methods of Mending and 
Patching. Clothing leaders were 
pleased to learn how to reweave a 
patch on woven material and In 
knitted garmens. 

Clothing accessories such as 
hats, purses, gloves and collars 
were displayed at the afternoon 
meeting. Leaders discovered that 
many accessories maybe hand- 
made from leftovers at home. 

The lesson at the training class 
was given by Mary Hood Gillaspie, 
Home Demonstration Agent, as- 
sisted by leaders. 

All local clubs in the county 
will have mending and clothing 
accessories for their major project 
in January. 

Following are the clubs schedul- 
ing meetings for the rest of the 
month: Walton, Mrs Carrie Rouse, 
Jan. 13th; Rabbit Hash, Mrs> 
Vernon Stephens, Jan. 17th; New 
Haven, Jan. 18th; Bullittsville, 
Miss Mattie Kreylich, Jan 20th; 
Florence, Town Hall, Jan. 21st; 
Taylorsport, Mrs. Essie Good- 
ridge, Jan. 21st. . 



A wedding of interest ,to re- 
latives and friends in Walton was 
solemnized on Saturday after- 
noon, December 18, in Prestwick, 
Scotland, when Miss Jane McGill 
Dunlop became the bride of Mr. 
Stevenson Brooke Ranson at St. 
Cuthbert Presbyterian Church. 

Rev. Luke McQuitty officiated 
at the cermony. The bride, given 
in marriage by her father, wore a 
broadcaded white-satin wedding 
gown made with a long, full train. 
Her bridal veil was of white tulle, 
which fell from* a coronet of 
orange blossoms. She carried 
white bridal roses. 

Miss Jane Bailey, cousin, of the 
bride and her only attendant, 
wore a gown of ice-blue faille. Her 
bouquet was of Talisman roses. 
Corporal John Dunlop of the 
Royal Scottish Guards, brother of 
the bride, was best man. 

Following the ceremony, a re- 
ception was held at The Olde 
Dutch Tea Inn, which was decor- 
ated with Christmas greens. «, . 

After the reception, the bridal 
couple left for a wedding trip to 
Edinburg, the bride wearing a 
gray woolen suit with hat and 
accessories of a contrasting color. 

The bride is the only daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. James Dunlop of 
Prestwick, Scotland. 

Mr. Ranson is the son of Mr. 
Stanley Ranson and the late Mrs. 
Laura Bedinger Ranson of Wal- 
ton, Ky. Following his elemen- 
tary education in Paris, Ky where 
he spent his childhood with his 
aunt and uncle, Dr. and Mrs. J. 
A. Orr, he was graduated from 
Beechwood High School, Fort 
Mitchell, completed a course at 
the Aero Technical Institute, Los 
Angles, and later was connected 
with the Glenn Martin Airplane 
Corporation, Baltimore. For a year 
he was with the Pan-American 
Airlines in Africa, and now is with 
the Transcontinental and Western 
Airlines in Scotland. 



Six Men Appointed 
To Work On Paper 
Salvage In State 



The critical paper situation that 
exists at the present time has 
caused the War Production Board 
to send six men to work on the 
paper salvage in Kentucky during 
the month of January. These six 
men have been assigned twenty 
counties each, and they will assist 
in perfecting the paper salvage in 
all communities now at work and 
to establish a paper salvage in 
those communities that have not 
undertaken this vital war enter- 
prise. These men have been in- 
structed to bring together all 
forces in the community in an 
effort to stop the burning of every 
bit of waste paper and see that 
this paper is sold to a dealer. 

The following men will do the 
work for the War Production 
Board: Edward G. Lebre, Henry 
P. Rawson, J. Marcus Greer, and 
W. B. Chagny of Louisville; E. B. 
Hall of Lexington; and J. Warren 
Smith, of .Cincinnati. 

In many communities it will be 
necessary to center the peper 
collection around the schools. Ex- 
perience has shown that school 
pupils will he able to bring to 
school on one day of each week an 
average of 5 pounds of paper per 
pupil. This paper consists of 75 
per cent newspapers and 25 per 
cent other paper. 

It is the hope of the War Pro- 
duction Board that all schools in 
Kentucky will accept a quota of 
5pounds per pupil each week and 
that each school will designate one 
day in the week as paper collect- 
ion day. It is planned to have the 
paper moved from the schools on 
the day that it is collected. The 
schools will receive the money 
from the sale of the peper and 
may devote this to any purpose 
the school desires. 

In addition, it will be necessary 
to secure all waste paper from the 
business districts in every com- 
munity, and it will be necessary 
for each community to make pro- 
vision for this. The War Product- 
ion Board representative will 
assist in solving all problems, 
such as storage, transportation 
and price to be received. 



S. Whitehouse Dunlap Farm 
Receives "Herd Improvement 
Regtetery" Certificate. 



"The S. Whitehouse Dunlap 
Farm, received from >The Ameri- 
can Jersey Cattle Club their 
"Herd Improvement Registry" 
Certificate for the year ending 
October 31, 1943. The herd is on 
test and is re-entered for the 
third consecutive year. 

With all the adversities the 
farmers in 1943 had to meet, this 
herd of fine registered Jerseys 
came through with a good per- 
formance. 

The Certificate shows there 
were twenty-two cows in the herd 
which gave 132,281 pounds of milk 
and 6695 pounds fat. The herd 
averaged 14.10 cows in milk. Each 
cow averaged 8242 pounds of milk, 
5.06% fat and 417 pounds of fat 
on twice a day milkink. 

There were nine cows that pro- 
duced over 400 pounds of fat dur- 
ing a 305 day lacation. 



Attend the Public Sale Friday. 
January 14th at one o'clock, to be 
held at the V. P. Kerns farm, one 
mile south of Walton. See his ad 
on another page of this paper. 



Charles E. Rider 



gjanua 

fiohn 



Jewelry and Music Store 
Opened In Covington. 



Miss Billie Jean Allen of Inde- 
pendence was visiting her grand- 
mother, Mrs. Dora Fields over the 
week-end. 



Real Estate News 



Forest S. Thompson, Proprietor 
of The Mutual Realty Company, 
Williamstown, Kentucky, reports 
the sale of Attorney G. L. Tucker's 
Ultra-Modern Brick Dwelling, 
located on North Main Street, 
Williamstown to Wilbur stith, 
Charlotte Height, Williamstown, 
Ky. 

Mr. Stith is to be congratulated 
on securing this most lovely home. 
Mr. Stith will move to his new 
home in the next thirty days, and 
Attorney Tucker plans to move to 
Cynthiana, Ky., later, where he 
has opened a newly equipped suite 
of law offices. 



Hanser Jewerly & Music Co., 
which just recently opened a store 
at 515% Madison Avenue, Coving- 
ton, has its initial advertisement 
in this issue of The Advertiser. 

The company will sell musical 
instruments, and various guitar, 
cord and instruction books, strings 
for all instruments and other 
accessories. The store also has a 
complete musical, watch and 
clock repair department. 



GOSHEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Finer, Kentucky 



Cecil F. McKce, Pastor 
Services 2nd and 4th Sundays. 
10:00 A. M. Sunday School. 
11:00 A. M. Church Service. 
6:00 P. M. Christian Youth 
Fellowship. 
7:30 P. M. Evening Service. 



Charles E. Rider, age 57, farmer 
of Glencoe R. 1 passed away 
suddendly with an attack of 
asthma at his home Wednesday, 
January 5th. 

He was born at Steels Creek, 
Gallatin County, August 8th, 
1886 and lived in Gallatin County 
all his life. 

Mr. Rider was a member of tne 
Paint. Lick Baptist Church where 
his funeral took place Saturday, 
anuary 8th at 2 p. m. with Rev. 
Ashcraft having charge of 
the services. Burial was In the 
church cemetery. 

Mr. Rider is survived by his 
wife, Mrs. Julia Stewart Rider, 
one daughter, Mrs. Carl M. Jones 
of Glencoe and four sons, Robert 
Rider of Warsaw, James W. Rider, 
Ft. Belveior, Va., Kenneth Rider, 
serving with the U. S. Air Corps 
and Clifford Rider of Erlanger; 
three brothers, Wm. of Verona, 
Earnie, Patriot, Ind., Seab, El 
Paso, HI., and four sisters, Mrs. 
Mollie Davis, Williamstown, Ky., 
Mrs. Mary Ranier, Patriot, Ind., 
Mrs. Grace Scott and Mrs. Stella 
Blackburn of Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Hamilton Funeral Home of 
Verona were in charge of the 
arrangements. 



National Red Cross Nursing 
Representative In Northern 
Kentucky. 



Miss Esther Finley, Special 
Consultant on Red Cross Home 
Nursing, is conducting confer- 
ences for instructors throughout 
Kentucky. She was at Covington 
Red Cross Headquarters all day 
January sixth and seventh. A 
large number of Nurse instructors 
attended. Many problems, ways 
and means of teaching were dis- 
cussed and those who attended 
feel much benefited by instruct- 
ions which were given. 

Miss Elizabeth Lowry, Boone 
County Red Cross Nurse attended 
both days. 



Sarah Eliza McWethy 



Mrs. H. A. Alister who has been 
visiting with her mother, Mrs. E.J 
B. Powers and family during the 
holidays left Monday for her home 
in Battle Creek, Mich. 



INDEPEN DENCE CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 

Lee Doty. Mtadster 

Sunday School — 10:00 a. m. 

Worship and Communion— 
11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship— 3:00 p. m. 

You are enrdlally invited to 
attend any wad ell 



Bearcats Defeat 
New Haven 23-22 



The Walton-Verona Bearcats 
led by Pennington and Elliott 
downed New Haven Friday night 
on the local floor in one of the 
closest games played so far this 
year. The Bearcats led by a score 
of 10 to 5 at the half. 

-In the third quarter the Tigers 
started gaining on our boys and 
at the end of the quarter were 
leading by 7 points, which they 
held until about four minutes of 
play was left, then the Bearcats 
started gaining on the New Haven 
boys and finished up one point 
ahead of them when the whistle 
blew. $ 

Pennington and Elliott were 
high point men for the Bearcats 
with 15 and 7. Wharton and 
Moore were high for New Haven 
with 10 and 5 each. 

The Cubs were overjoyed by 
wining their first game by a score 
of 19 to 16 with Roberts and 
Gruelli taking top scoring honors 
with 7 points each. 



Sarah Eliza McWethy passed 
away at her home in Petersburg 
Saturday after a prolonged illness. 

Her remains -ere taken to the 
Chambers anc". Grubbs funeral 
home for preparation. Tuesday 
morning she was returned to 
Petersburg Methodist Church 
where services were conducted 
Tuesday afternoon at 2 p. m. 
with the Rev. O. B. Thomas 
officiating. Burial was In Peters- 
burg Cemetery. 

Miss McWethy spent her entire 
life in Petersburg and leaves many 
friends to mourn her passing. She 
also leaves one sister and several 
nephews and neices. 



Fourth War Loan 
Drive To Begin 
Tuesday. Jan. 14th 



The Fourth War Loan Drive 
begins next Tuesday, January 18. 
The quota for Boone County Is 
$500,000.00 for individuals which 
amount has been broken down 
into the twelve precincts as 
follows; 

Precinct Quota 

Beaver ,.^,r , $ 19,277.09 

Belleview 19,707.88 

Bullittsville <fc Hebron 44,471.23 

Burlington 68,483.54 

Carlton 17,914.52 

Constance !, 27,935.61 

Florence '.. 112,670.65 

Hamilton 16,638.66 

Petersburg 27,468.68 

Union 40,568.54 

Verona 24,669.92 

Walton 80,193.68 

A. B. Renaker will continue as 
County Chairman with the follow- . 
ing percinct Chairmen who served 
in the past drives; 

Robert L. Green, Beaver; C. E. 
McNeely, Belleview; John L. Con- 
ner, Bullittsville-Hebron; C. D. 
Benson, Burlington; W. H. Presser, 
Carlton; C. Liston Hempfling, 
Constance; C. F. Blankenbeker, 
Florence; Thomas Huff, Hamil- 
ton; J. H. Huey, Petersburg; Miss 
Lillian Bristow, Union; G. C. 
Ransom, Verona; Charles W. 
Thompson, Walton. 

The citizens of the county are 
requested to contact their pre- 
cinct chairman and offer their 
services in soliciting subscript- 
ions. Go to your bank and volun- 
ter your subscription and not 
wait for some one to call on you. 
This would make the task of ris- 
ing our quota so much easier. The 
Chairman, precinct chairmen and 
workers are donating their ser- 
vices without hope of reward ex- 
cept to hasten the day of Victory. 
Do your part by subscribing 
Liberally. 

In addition to the usual Series 
E, F and G bonds, the Treasury 
offers a 2Vi% bond dated Feb- 
ruary 1st, due in 1959 but callable 
in 1956; a ftto% bond dated Feb- 
ruary 1st, due 1970 but callable in 
1965; a %?< Certificate of Indebt- 
edness dated February 1st, due in 
one year; and Treasury Savings 
Notes, Series C, due in 3 years, to 
yield 1.07% if held to maturity, or 
may be used for tax purposes. 

Total amount to be raised in 
the nation is $14,000,000,000.00. 
• In past drives the County 
Chairman has been provided with 
gasoline coupons to meet the re- 
quirements of workers when using** 
an automobile. In this drive the 
O. P. A. advises that each in- 
dividual worker will have to make 
application direct to the county 
O. P. A. office for gasoline to be 
used in soliciting bond subscript- 
ions. 

Lets all do our best to raise our 
quota. 



Waste Paper To Be 
Collected In Walton. 



Watch this paper for an- 
nouncement of the date waste 
paper will be collected for the 
Government. Waste paper Is 
desperately needed, arrange- 
ments ' have been made to 
collect all paper saved before 
February 15th. 

Mr. J. W. Smith of the War 
Production Board met with 
the Advisory Counsel of the 
Homemakers in Burlington 
Tuesday to make arrangements 
for this drive. 



Boone County! j 
Tuberculosis Ass'n 
Thanks Its Friends 



I, as Executive Secretary of the 
Boone County Tuberculosis Ass'n 
wish to thank the good and civic 
minded people of Boone County 
for purchasing Tuberculosis 
Christmas Seals. I also wish to 
thank the publishers of this paper 
who gave many many lines of free 
space to promote the sale of the 
scls, and to the teachers and 
pupils who have worked untiring- 
ly to make the seal sale a success. 

It seems that our goal will fall 
a little short, but even at that, 
Boone County people have pur- 
chased more Christmas Seals than 
any other time in history. We will 
give you a complete statement of 
the sale as soon as all the schools 
report. 

Remember too, it is not too late 
to send in your dollars for seals. 
R. V.. Lents 



Young Hunter Dies 
Of Gunshot Wounds. 



I 



Henry Stewart, 14-year-old son 
of Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Stewart, 
Rural Route 1, Independence, Ky., 
died Wednesday, January 6th at 
Booth Hospital, Covington, Ky., of 
shotgun wounds accidentally 
suffered Saturday when on a 
hunting trip near his home. A 
gun carted by his brother, Chas., 
12, was discharged accidentally, 
hospital authorities said. 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



■ems 




\ Jane Corby 



- 



Thursday, January 13, 1944 



McCLUriE SYNDICATE - WN U. FEATURES 




Jun 



Paul Harris, manager of the Devon 
Arms, elves Jan Fayson the lead In 
the hotel floor show when he finds that 
William Anthony Deverest, rich and pop- 
ular, knows her. But Jan thinks he is 
Tony Williams, the chauffeur, and he is 
afraid to tell her the truth because he 
knows she Hates Deverest. She breaks 
with Tony believing him dishonest. Dr. 
Curtis, who has cured her Invalid sister, 
asks Jan to marry him, Just before he 
foes to his northern camp. When she 
learns that Deverest is to announce his 
engagement at a Christmas party at the 
hotel she decides to go to Dr. Curtis' 
camp. The bus takes Jan north and runs 
into a bad snowstorm. Tony picks np 
her trail. J> 



CHAPTER VI 

"I'm sure it wasn't there," said 
Paul. "Dora certainly would have 
mentioned it to me." 

"Go back and ask her," Tony 
urged. "We've got to know!" 

When he rejoined Tony, Paul 
found that young man almost be- 
side himself with impatience. 

"Dora hasn't seen the cat—" 

"Then what are we waiting for?" 
cried Tony, hustling Paul down the. 
Stairs and out into his car. 

"Let you off at the hotel," said 
Tony between clenched teeth. "I am 
going to make a round of the rail- 
road stations." 

He had about given up when he 
discovered a man who remembered 
seeing a girl, in a green coat and 
carrying a basket with some sort 
of animal inside, buying a bus tick- 
et Tony's informant decided that it 
must have been a northbound bus. 

At every bus station he stopped 
and questioned the attendant Gen- 
erally somebody remembered the 
girl in the green coat But the an- 
swer to the one question that mat- 
tered was always <he same. No — 
the girl hadn't got off at this station. 

The telephone rang. 

Everybody straightened as the 
bus driver took down the receiver. 

"Yeah? . . . Good! . . . Okay 
... I get it" 

He hung up the receiver and 
started for the door. "The bridge 
la safe. Come on, folks. Step on 
it Got to make up for lost time." 

The bus with a sudden lurch slid 
sideways; the bride screamed. In- 
stinctively Jan felt for the arm of 
the seat with one hand and braced 
herself as she reached for Pussy- 
puff's slipping basket with the oth- 
er. 

The bus seemed to hang suspend- 
ed for a second as if undecided 
whether or not to turn, over. Then, 
slowly, so that Jan felt she could al- 
most see the wheels sink gently into 
the snow covered ditch, the bus tilt- 
ed to one side and lay there, pant- 
ing. 

Surprisingly enough the lights of 
the village «jpi not seem to come 
any closer. Tony tried desperately 
to see if a road led off from the 
main highway, which, evidently, 
ran some distance from the town, 
but the soft unbroken snow effec- 
tively concealed any such road, 
even if there were one. 

The little wayside stand- before 
which he finally drew up did not 
seem firm enough to withstand the 
fury" of the wind that rushed at 
him as he opened the door. 

"You'd better shut that door, 
mister," the young man tending the 
counter said brusquely, "it's one 
freezing night!" 

"Do you suppose that the buses 
try to get through on a night like 
this?" 

"Oh, sure. Nothing stops them." 
"Just tell me if the last bus went 
through," asked Tony, impatiently. 
"Sure, about two hours ago. But, 
as I was sayin' — " 
"Two hours ago?" 
"Yeah. They was late on ac- 
count of the bridge bein' unsafe — " 
"They had to go over a bridge 
that wasn't safe?" 

"I'm tryin' to tell you. The bridge 

got fixed." 

Tony gave a sigh of relief. 

"But they never did get to the 

next station. Had a call from Moose 

River an hour or so ago. Must 

have been some sort of accident." 

"You fool! v Tony shouted. "Why 

didn't you tell me there'd been an 

accident when I first came in? How 

badly were they hurt?" 

"Say, mister," the young man 

said aggrievedly, "I'm no receiv- 

ling- set! Just -an accident that's 

all they told me. Somewheres along 

the road ..." 

But the last words were lost on 
Tony as he slammed out of the sta- 
tion and flung himself into the car. 
The next minute, careless of drift- 
ing snow, he was driving headlong 
around hairpin turns and down the 
steep grades of the mountain road. 
A moan? Singing! 
The gratitude that enveloped 
Tony made him realize how miser- 
ably sure he had been that he 
'Would come upon a silent and 
frightening scene. Of course Jan-, 
brave as she was, would sing in 
the face of disaster. But as the 
chorus swelled louder and he heard 
many voices Joined with hers, he 
was definitely reassured. 
"O come, all ye faithful. 
Joyful and triumphant — " 
As the beautiful old hymn rolled 
forth toward him Tony felt that he 
wanted to sing, too. 

Were all runaways as glad to be 
back home as she was? Jan won- 
dered. Even runaways who had 
Accomplished nothing by their esca- 



pades, who were still faced with all 
the problems they had tried to es- 
cape? Dora was still thin almost 
to transparency, but she sat up 
really straight in her wheel chair 
and her blue eyes were radiant 
when she announced, that Paul was, 
going to take her .to the party. 

Now that she knew Dora was go- 
ing, however, there was no help for 
it; Jan had to go too. But she lin- 
gered so over brushing Dora's curls 
and fastening a sprig of holly at 
one side, that Dora protested. 

There was a soft knock on the 
sitting room door. 

"From Mr. Deverest,", said the 
boy who handed her a square 
white box. 

Jan undid the ribbon after glanc- 
ing at the name, "Miss Jan Pay- 
son," on the outside of the box. In- 
side was a mass of orchids. 

Jan looked at the enclosed card. 
There was a mistake— the box was 
from Tony. She read: 

"Chin up! Christmas is coming. 
Tony." 

The roof garden had been trans- 
formed into a regular dream of a 
Christmas party. In the center of 
the dance floor stood a Christmas 
tree, so tall that the electric star at 
the top seemed very far away; It 
was decorated as a Christmas tree 
should be decorated, Paul pointed 
out firmly. 

"I had no idea Paul could be so 
funny!" gasped Jan, choking with 
laughter after a particularly hilari- 
ous introduction of a "snowflake 
dance." Dora leaned forward, her 
cheeks suddenly pink. 

"You look as if it is, a happy 
something," said Jan. 

"It is. Paul and 1W* Dora hesi- 
tated,. and began again.' "I — Paul 
— oh, Jan, he loves me! He wants 
to marry me and take care of me 
always!" 

"Dora, darling," Jan jumped up 
and threw her arms around her sis- 
ter, "I'm so glad!" 

Jan Jumped when someone behind 
her said suddenly, "Here I am!" 
Before she could turn, Tony had 
slipped into the vacant place by 
her side. 

"Oh, Tony!" she cried. Then, 
lowering her voice, "Is Mr. Dev- 
erest here?" 

"Yes. But don't you worry about 
him. I fixed that up all right" 

"Shall I -tell him?" Dora broke in, 
and without waiting for Jan's nod 
she made the announcement of her 
engagement 

"Dora," Tony began. "I'm in a 
spot. I want to propose to a girl 
and I've never done it before. Now, 
as an engaged girl who has ex- 
perienced a proposal, I want your 
advice. Maybe you'll listen to what 
I've prepared, and see how it sounds 
to you. I know it won't be so good 
as Paul's, but let me rehearse it 
anyway." 

Jan, turning swiftly, opened her 
mouth to speak, but Dora fore- 
stalled her. 

"Go ahead, Tony," she invited. 
"I'll be glad to tell you what I can 
to improve your technique." 

"All right— here goes." Tony 
drew a deep breath. "Now we'll 
pretend I'm talking to the girL I 
begin something like this— 

" 'D-darling, I Hove you . . .* " 

"Good!" Dora interrupted, clap- 
ping her hands. 

•■You think that'll do? Then," 
Tony went on, "I thought I might 
say 'Will you marry me?' " 

"Jan— will you?" 

"Yes, Tony," said Jan. 

"Well," Tony defended himself, 
"I told you I didn't know bow to 
propose." 

Paul dodged over to their table, 
and after a while he tapped his 



fork against a glass to get atten- 
tion. 

"Ladies and gentlemen," he an- 
nounced, "there's no need to ask 
if you're having a good time. And 
I'm sure you want to thank the 
man responsible for it. May I pre- 
sent your host, William Anthony 
Deverest!" 

Tony bowed and grinned while 
they cheered him to the echo. 
"I can't begin to thank you for 
this reception," said Tony when he 
could make himself heard. "But I 
want to tell you that you'd better 
cut it short because each person 
is to get a present 'from that tree 
and there are a lot of people here." 
He made his way to the center 
of the floor, and at a, signal from 
Paul, several of the hotel employ- 
ees hovering in the doorway rushed 
forward to help him. Twenty-four 
Santa Clauses from the orchestra 
lined up behind them and as each 
present wag detached from the tree 
Tony read aloud the name on the 
gift and then shouted: 

"Paging Santa Claus! Another gift 
for special delivery." 

At that point a Santa Claus would 
detach himself from the group, 
seize the gift and go in search of 
the recipient. Soon the room was 
full of red figures bearing gifts and 
as Tony reached each name Jack 
and his friends took up the cry: 
"Paging Santa Claus!" 
Under cover of all the excite- 
ment Jan, very white, leaned close 
to Paul. 

"You've made a terrible mis- 
take!" she whispered. "And it's 
all my fault. That's Mr. Deverest's 
chauffeur, Tony Williams. I intro- 
duced him here as Mr. Deverest 
because you seemed to think . . ." 
"What do you mean Deverest's 
chauffeur?" Paul interrupted, gen- 
uinely astonished. "I know Tony 
Deverest— I knew his chauffeur, too 
—the last one he had. He fired him 
about a month ago. That's Tony 
Deverest all right, up there at the 
Christmas tree. Listen!" 

Tony's voice came clearly to 
Jan's doubting ears: 

"There's just one present left on 
the tree and I'm going to call the 
one for whom it Is intended up here 
to receive it Will Miss Jan Pay- 
son please come forward?" 
Jan sat motionless. 
"Go on, Jan," whispered Dora. 
"Don't you hear Tony calling you?" 
As in a dream, Jan rose and 
made her way through the tables. 
The blue dress rippled softly about 
her and her face, beautiful and se- 
rious, was turned toward Tony. 
When she reached the tree he took 
her hand and guided It to a small 
white package almost hidden in the 
green branches. 

"Open it" he said softly, and 
she obeyed. The outer wrappings 
removed, there was disclosed a tiny 
jeweler's box. 

"Paul called you William Anthony 
Deverest" she murmured, bewil- 
dered. 

"Paul was right," said Tony. 
"And you've promised to be Mrs. 
William Anthony Deverest" 

He took the box from her and out 
of it he took a ring. Jan scarcely 
looked at it as Tony slipped it on 
her finger. Her eyes were on his 
face and she did not move them 
even when he turned to the audi- 
ence and said, his voice full of 
pride and tenderness: 

"I am happy to tell you that Miss 
Jan Payson has promised to marry 
me. That's true, isn't it?" he add- 
ed softly to the girl beside him. 

For answer Jan took a step clos- 
er and Tony, his arms around her, 
could barely catch her whispered, 
"It's a promise." 

[THE END] 



VnTrm I SUNDAY 

International II SCHOOL 

-:- LESSON-:- 

Bv HAROLD t,. LUNDOUIST, D. D. 
Of The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago. 
Released by Western Newspaper Union. 



Lesson for January 16 

Lesson subjects and Scripture texts se- 
lected and copyrighted* by International 
Council of Religious Education; used by 
permission. 



JESUS ANSWERS HIS CRITICS 

LESSON TEXT— Mark J:23-3:8. 

GOLDEN TEXT— Blessed are ye, when 
men shall revile you, and persecute you, 
and shall say all manner of evil against 
you falsely, for my sake.— Matthew 5:11. 



INDIAN BEEF 

By Harold Channing Wire 




Hidden peril lay along the 
route of a great trail driva 
from Texas to Wyoming. 
How Lew Burnet, trail 
boss, met that peril is told 
in "Indian Beef." 

Here is a story where 
eourage and daring and 
skill in gunplay have lead- 
ing roles. Be sure to read 
this thrilling serial. 



Look for It 

IN THIS 
NEWSPAPER 



BEGINNING NEXT ISSUE 



Criticism and opposition was the 
constant lot of our Lord as He gave 
Himself in His labor of love for man- 
kind. It follows His disciples to this 
day, for men seem to have not only 
ingratitude, but an evil spirit which 
rewards kindness with hard words 
and unjust accusation. 

The scribes and Pharisees had al- 
ready found ground for their com- 
plaint, for He had eaten "with pub- 
licans and sinners" (2:16). The fact 
that He went there to win Matthew 
and to heal the sinsick (2:17) made 
no difference. Then they wanted to 
know why His disciples did not ob- 
serve a fast (2:18) in the solemn 
way they should. How could they, 
when the Lord was in their midst? 
They were Joyful. 

In our lesson we find these hating, 
watching enemies of our Lord's 
showing their bitterness in two 
ways. 
I. Open Accusation (2:23-28). 
They got at Him this time through 
His beloved disciples. It was the 
indirect approach so often used 
by cowardly people who want to hurt 
someone, but who dare not face him 
squarely. They spread evil reports 
or unkind criticism about a loved 
one, and thus wound the one they 
hate. 

Their accusation was, however, in 
a sense a direct one. They claimed 
that He was the one who had per- 
mitted His disciples to violate the 
Sabbath law by plucking and rub- 
bing the ears of corn to prepare 
them to be eaten. In other words. 
He had allowed them to do a secular 
thing on a sacred day and thus to 
violate the holiness of the Sabbath. 
What they did was not wrong, but 
they did it on the wrong day, said 
these critics. 

Jesus met the charge by reaffirm- 
ing the high viewpoint of God con- 
cerning man. We have lowered our 
conception of man's position, while 
at the same time exalting his unde- 
pendable judgment 

Everything that concerns man is 
sacred in the sight of God. Hunger 
is natural, God made man that way. 
He gets hungry on the Sabbath day, 
so he must have food on that day. 
The Sabbath was made to serve him, 
and he must not be harmed or hin- 
dered by his servant 

Now, someone will say: "That 
means I can do what I like on the 
Sabbath— or the Lord's Day." No, 
it does not. What you need is right 
What you desire may not be. You 
are more than an animal, so you 
must have more than physical rest 
and recreation on Sunday. You are 
more than a mental being, hence 
you need more than culture— read- 
ing, music or friendship on that day. 
You are a spiritual being and must 
hava fellowship with God. 

See how nicely it all balances up 
when we go God's way. Then noth- 
ing that concerns us is common or 
secular. It is all sacred. 
II. SUent Hatred (3:1-6). 
Open criticism is bad, but it be- 
comes worse when it is hidden in 
the heart of a watching man (v. 2), 
one who looks for his opportunity to 
strike. 

The scene is a most dramatic one. 
Jesus came into the synagogue on 
the Sabbath day as was His cus- 
tom. (By the way, is it your cus- 
tom to go to church on Sunday?) "In 
that synagogue was a man wUh a 
withered hand. Here occurs one of 
those incidental things, which are so 
full of heauty in these narratives. 
Seeking to find accusation against 
Him, His enemies nevertheless all 
unconsciously paid Him a supreme 
compliment. They associated Him 
immediately, not with the chief seat 
of the synagogue, but with the most 
needy man in the crowd." 

"They watched Him" (v. 2). The 
air was full of silent, malicious, cun- 
ning hatred. Jesus faced them with 
an alternative so high, so holy and 
exacting that they dared not speak. 
He pointed out that we either do 
good or harm, heal or kill, by bur 
response to a human need. It can- 
not be ignored. What would they 
do with it? Keep their strict man- 
made regulations, or honor God by 
helping a needy one on the Sabbath? 
They dared not answer. 

Then He healed the man. He did 
not touch him. He did not do any 
work, except a miraculous healing. 
But it was enough. The Herodians 
and the Pharisee|, who hated each 
other, now became friends because 
they both hated Jesus. 

What an awful picture of what 
may be in the human heart even in 
the Lord's house on the day of wor- 
ship. What was in your heart when 
you last went into the church? 'Love 
and a desire for the good of your 
neighbor, or hatred and malice? 

Here again^pur Lord declared the 
dignity of man in the plan of God, 
and placed his need above the keep- 
ing of a day. We are too little in- 
terested in the help we can give, and 
too fearful of the criticism of others. 



Now Is Time When Fancy Turns 
To Thoughts of a New Blouse 



By CHERIE NICHOLAS 




I ASK ME 4% 

J ANOTHER { 

| A General Quiz 



TF THE usual January lull that fol- 
*■ lows after the excitement of the 
holidays is gripping you, here's how 
to work a perfect cure — go blouse 
shopping! All signs point to the big- 
gest blouse season ever this spring. 
The better part of wisdom is to 
make your selections early so you 
will get first pick before the choicest 
selections are depleted. 

Please don't think that the mis- 
sion of a blouse is merely to play 
accompaniment to the suit, for when 
it comes to important style news 
one of the outstanding themes for 
now and the months to follow is the 
blouse-dress. For these smart two- 
piece dresses not only is the blouse 
teamed with a dirndl or, if you pre- 
fer, a slim-silhouetted skirt for day- 
time wear, but the formal evening 
mode makes much of costumes that 
combine a floor-length sheathlike 
skirt of rich rayon crepe or elegant 
velvet with a gorgeous blouse. 

This new favorite of fashion, the 
separate top for evening wear,- pro- 
vides a lovely way to stretch your 
dress-up wardrobe. The blouse cen- 
tered in the illustration presents a 
striking use of glitter trim on the 
blouse that is otherwise strictly tai- 
lored. This handsome dinner-blouse 
of snowy ribbed rayon crepe has dec- 
orative Chinese characters done in 
gilt and crystal beading on the 
square breast pocket and on each of 
the self-fabric covered buttons. This 
unusual blouse bespeaks arresting 
style distinction. 

For refreshing appeal at this time 
of the year it's the gay print blouse 
that "steals the show." The impor- 
tance of prints for the blouse is be- 
ing acclaimed throughout advance 
spriifg fashion news. The delightful 
model to the left is typical of that 
which is to be. For this charming 



Buttons in New Role 




Buttons used as hair ornaments 
and as fine jewelry bespeak a de- 
parture from the strictly utilitarian 
use ascribed to them in yester years. 
Fashion's newest novelty is the rib- 
bon necklet originated by Mainboch- 
er to gracefully break the long throat 
line of milady when she wears the 
new low-cut frocks. It is a fashion 
that will go to many parties and 
opera scenes this year. The neck- 
let pictured is easily fashioned by 
nimble fingers. Instead of a glit- 
tering jewel a beautiful silver button 
(silver jewelry is smart this season) 
is set in the heart of the bow. The 
lady also deftly anchors with the aid 
of bobby pins two silver button origi- 
nals into her hair-do. It's a pret- 
ty fashion and one easy to duplicate. 
You can get silver buttons at the 
regular button counter that are as 
handsome as real jewelry. 



little afternoon costume both blouse 
and skirt feature the new drawstring 
styling. For the skirt the designer 
uses fine rayon crepe in solid black, 
accenting its modishness with a deft 
drawstring treatment at the waist- 
line. The flattering blouse, so sweet- 
ly feminine with its fluffy-ruffles, 
is done in brilliant floral-print rayon 
crepe. Drawstrings gather the long 
sleeves in at the wrist and a soft 
self-fabric bow decorating the 
V-neckline stresses the importance 
of the bow-tie blouse for spring. 

To wear with skirts or slacks in 
the daytime or for dinner and loung- 
ing, a blouse of novelty ribbed rayon 
crepe in a brilliant rose gives utmost 
flattery, especially if it be styled aft- 
er the manner of the blouse pictured 
to the right The graceful cascad- 
ing of the soft-falling jabot collar 
is in accord with newest styling 
trends. Take particular noUce of 
the cuffs, for their long tab effect 
interprets a decidedly new technique 
which does away with the severity 
of a tight-buttoned wrist band. A 
high built belted-in front line distin- 
guishes the trim military slacks 
which place rose-colored grosgraln 
ribbon stripes at each side seam. 
Smooth tailored spun rayon and 
wool in a smart herringbone weave 
is used for the slacks. 

There is a luxury look about many 
of the new blouses that is very eye- 
appealing due to a great extent to 
the charm and loveliness of the new 
output of rayon-weave materials. 
These pretty fabrics are so easily 
available this year and they include 
a vast variety, from the very prac- 
tical white crepes that come out 
white as ever after each tubbing 
to the most formal types of velvets, 
brocades, taffetas and crepes in 
fashionable costume colors. Many of 
the smartest blouses are made of 
rayon jersey and the midwinter dis- 
plays include lovely dressy types of 
rayon lace in black, white and 
colors. 
Released by Western Newspaper Union. 

Luxury Lace Blouses 
Staging Revival 

In this season, noted for its, gala 
blouses, the revival of luxury lace 
blouses is a natural sequence. The 
new models are all delightfully frilly 
with lace jabots and rufflings and 
lace bows, also rosettes made of 
lace. The call for snow white ac- 
cents with black brings the pure 
white lace blouse into prominence. 
Some of these are enhanced with glit- 
tering rhinestone buttons. Others 
look the part of elegant simplicity 
with their large white pearl-bead but- 
tons. One pretty lace blouse has a 
huge rose corsage, fashioned of pet- 
als cut out of the lace, each huge 
petal picoted around the edge. The 
big sensation is the blouse of ex- 
quisitely sheer black lace, you can't 
get it too sheer to suit Dame Fash- 
ion. The sheerer the more flattering 
is the prevailing sentiment. Some 
of the black lace beauties have tiny 
cap sleeves and devastating sweet- 
heart or square necklines. Others 
equally as smart are long-sleeved to 
the wrist where their slender close- 
fitting lines suddenly burst out "into 
a wide flare of lace frills. 



? 

? 
? 
? 

? 

? 

»»• P- p- c- r- c- o- 1- p- o- e»- p» c- r- p- e- e- e- «w 

The Questions 

1. What is the insigne for the 
military police of the U. S. army? 

2. What is a gavotte? 

3. The Isle of Capri is in what 
sea? 

.4. A candidate for the presiden- 
cy of the United States must be at 
least how old? 

6. Superstitiously speaking, a 
loupgarpu is what? 

6. What is the Latin name of 
Switzerland? 



The Answers 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 



Crossed pistols. 
A dance. 

The Tyrrhenian sea. 
Thirty-five. 

A person able to assume 
wolfs form. 
6. Helvetia. 



Miseries 
ofSneety, 

SNIFFLY COLDS 

Put 3-purpos* Va-tro-nol up each 
nostril. It (1) shrinks swollen 
membranes, (2) soothes irritation, 
(3) helps dear cold- «,.„ 
clogged nose. Follow WlCU 

tawST VATtO MOl 



Good Counsel 
A man may think, if he will, 
that two eyes see no more than 
one; or that a gamester seeth al- 
ways more than a looker-on . . . 
but when all is done, the help of 
good counsel is that which setteth 
business strait. — Lord Bacon. 



THERE IS 
NO ASPIRIN 



, Btronger or faster than MSsafcas 
pure St. Joseph Aspirin. No aspirin can 
do more for you. World's largest seller a* 
10)!. 36 tablets 20*; 100 tablets only 36>. 
Be sure you demand St. Joseph Aspirin. 



Improvements an Farms 
Of the 6,100,000 farms in the 
United States today, 5,000,000 do 
not have running water, 5,400,000 
do not have an inside toilet, and 
6,500,000 do not have a bathtub. 



Beware Coughs 

from common colds 

That Hang On 

Creomulslon relieves promptly be- 
cause It goes right to the seat of the 
trouble to help loosen and expel 
germ laden phlegm, and aid nature 
to soothe and heal raw, tender. In- 
flamed bronchial mucous mem- 
branes. Tell your druggist to sell you 
a bottle of Creomulslon with the un- 
derstanding you must like the way it 
quickly allays the cough or you are 
to have your money back. 

CREOMULSION 

for Coughs, Chest Colds, Broadutit 



30-Pound Headdress 

The headdress of a nomad' wom- 
an of Turkestan, adorned with 
more than 30* pounds of coins, is 
the equivalent of a new autumn 
hat 



SNAPPY FACTS 




ABOUT 



RUBBER 



Designers Using Much 
Black Lace _ * Edgings 

Among the most attractive on the 
"little black dress" list is the type 
that is distinguished with exquisitely 
simple styling, placing the empha- 
sis on the new slender silhouette. 
With these ' adorable black crepe 
frocks come matching long-sleeve 
boleros. Comes the feminine touch 
in way of tiny edgings of black 
lace, finishing off neckline, skirt 
hemline, the short cap sleeves of the 
dress and the long fitted sleeves of 
the bolero, also traversing the little 
bolero about Its entire outline. It's 
the type of dress you'll love to wear. 



Lew certs prevailing, post- 
war world consumption of 
natural and synthetic rubber 
may total 2,000,000 tens a 
year. Is the prediction mad* 
recently by John I. Collyer, 
pre.ident of The B. P. Good- 
rich Co. This would bo nearly 
twice as much «• over con- 
sumsd in a record year to 
date. 

Some 32 million pounds of rubber 
will be needed by mo Army Sig- 
nal Corps this year for Insulating 
W-110-B wire used In maintaining 
direct communications. An additional 
4 million pounds will bo required 
for friction and splicing tape. Just 
two of the many rubber- using 
Items of this Army branch. 



Afisw^xfiC^x- 



In watcz peace 



REGoodrich 



F| RSTIN RURBFR 



*m* 



Thursday, January 13, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



V- 



F 



un 







PRIVATE 
BUCK 

By 
Clyde Lewis 





It beats me how that guy, Bock, can sleep so much !" 




CROSS 
TOWN 

By 
Roland Coe 





: 'm 



'They're WOUND stripes. I got two spankings t'day !" 



SPARKY WATTS 



MERCY, ' 

POCTAH STATIC 

60LOOKWHAT¥ 

COMIN' TO 

THIS HOUSE U 




By BOODY ROGERS 




LALA PALOOZA — Jhe 'Terrible' Turk 



By RUBE GOLDBERG 




REG'LAR FELLERS— Brand New Profession 



By GENE BYRNES 



■'iTWOULO 
BE PATRIOTIC, 
SHORTY, HOW> 
y ABOUT IT?, 




FREE I Haw 40 -page,' fall color book— ovar 
70 baking redoes. Writ* Stsndsrd Brands Inc.. 
6rwd Cwtral Anntx, Box 477.**w Vork,alnil, 
— Advertisement. 




. AtMrtaifd Htwt mm t 



CHATTERER GROWS VERY, 
VERY BOLD 



* I'm not afraid. I'm afraid. I'm 
not afraid." Chatterer the Red 
Squirrel kept faying these two 
things over and over again to him- 
self. You see, he really was afraid, 
and he was trying to make himself 
believe that he wasn't afraid. The 
trouble was that every time he said it 
a little voice, a little truthful voice 
down inside seemed to speak right 
up and tell him that he was afraid 

Poor Chatterer! It hurt his pride 
to have to own to himself that he 
wasn't as brave as little Tommy Tit 
the Chickadee. His common sense 
told him that there was no reason 
in the world why he shouldn't be. 
Tommy Tit went everyday and took 
food from the hand of Farmer 
Brown's Boy. It seemed to Chat- 
terer and to Happy Jack the Gray 
Squirrel and to Peter Rabbit and to 
Sammy Jay and to Blacky the Crow, 
all of whom had seen him do it, as 
if it was the very bravest thing they 
ever had seen, and their respect for 
Tommy Tit grew wonderfully. 

But Tommy Tit himself didn't 
think it brave at all. No, sir, Tom- 
my knew better. You see, he has a 
great deal of common sense under 
the little black cap he wears. "It 
may have been brave of me to do 
it the arst time," thought he to him- 
self when the others told him how 
brave they thought him, "but it isn't 
brave of me now, because I know 
that no harm is going to come to me 
from'Varmer Brown's Boy. There 
isn't any bravery about it, and it 
might be just the same way with 



CLASSIFIED 

DEPARTMENT 



Nurses' Training Schools 



MAKE UP TO SZS-S35 WEEK as s trained 

garttcal nurse 1 Learn quickly at home, 
ooklet free. CHICAGO SCHOOL OF 
MIIBSINO. Dept. CW-1. Chicago. 



FEATHERS WANTED 



FEATIIFBS WANTED, NEW OB OLD 

Ship or writ* to Sterling Feather Compui, 
M* N. Broaeway. St. Leols. tjlaaearl. 



ORANGES 



OBANGE8, tree-ripened. Bushel $2.50. 
Box S4.80. Cash and express collect. 
Pomona Nurseries, BSD, Dade City. 




"Coward! Coward! Coward!" 
screamed Sammy Jay. 

Chatterer and all the other little for- 
est and meadow people if only they 
would think so and give Farmer 
Brown's Boy half a chance." 

Chatterer was beginning to have 
aome thoughts himself as he tried 
to make himself think that he wasn't 
afraid. He heard the door of Farm- 
er Brown's house slam and peeped 
out from the old stone wall. There 
was Farmer Brown's Boy with a big 
fat hickory nut held out in the most 
tempting way, and Farmer Brown's 
Boy was Whistling the same little 
whistle he had used when Chatterer 
was his prisoner and he had brought 
good things for Chatterer to eat. Of 
course, Chatterer knew perfectly 
well that that whistle was a call for 
him, and that that big fat hickory 
nut was intended for him. Almost 
before he thought he had left the 
old stone wall and was halfway over 
to Farmer Brown's Boy. Then he 
stopped short. It seemed as if that 
little voice inside fairly had shouted 
in his ears, "I am afraid." It was 
true. He was afraid. He was right 
on the very point of turning to scur- 
ry back to the old stone wall when 
he heard another voice. This time 
it wasn't a voice inside. No, indeed! 
It was a voice from the top of one 
of the apple trees in the Old Or- 
chard, and this is what it said: 
"Coward! Coward! Coward!" It 
was Sammy Jay. 

Now it is one thing to tell yourself 
that you are afraid and it is quite 
another thing to be told by someone 
else that you are afraid. "No such 
thing! No such thing! I'm not 
afraid!" scolded Chatterer, and then 
to prove It he suddenly raced for- 
ward, snatched the fat hickory nut 
from the hand of Farmer Brown's 
Boy and was back in the old stone 
wan. It was hard to tell which 
was the most surprised— Chatterer 
himself. Farmer Brown's Boy, or 
Sammy Jay. "I did It! I did it! 
I did it!" boasted Chatterer. 

"You don't dare do it again, 
though!" said Sammy Jay, in the 
most provoking and unpleasant way. 

"I do, too!" snapped Chatterer, 
and he did it And with the taking 
of that second fat nut from the 
hand of Farmer Brown's Boy the 
very last bit of fear of him left Chat- 
terer, and he knew that Tommy Tit 
the Chickadee had been right all the 
time when he insisted that there was 
nothing to fear from Tanner 
Brown's Boy. 



Quick Work 

He— You certainly were married 
In style! But you didn't get much 
publicity in this morning's papers 
about your wedding. 

She — No, but the evening papers 
were full of my divorce. 



UncUPkilQ 

Some couples manage to patch 
up their old quarrels until they 
are almost as good as new. 

Have you noticed, the chronio 
kicker never kicks himself. 



The Old Cut Up ■» 

Harry— Listen to all that chatter! 
What's all the racket over at the 
barber shop? 

Jerry— The barber is shaving him- 
self and trying to talk himself into 
a massage! 



The fellow who is continually in hot 
water doesn't necessarily have a clean 
record. ~ ' 

Luck may plant a man In a high 
post of importance, but ability has 
to keep him there. 

Better the shoulder to the wheel 
than the back to the wall. 

Broad hints are wasted on nar- 
row-minded people. 

Don't tell other people your troubles. 
Most of them don't want to listen — and 
the rest are glad you have them. 



BACK IN GRANDMA'S DAY 

colds often called for medicated mutton 
suet aa a "home remedy*' to comfort 
muscle aches, coughing. Today, it's for 
Penetro, modern medication in a base 
containing mutton suet. Penetro's dou- 
ble action relieves these miseries — (1) va- 
porizes to soothe stuffy nose (2) acta like 
warming plaster right where rubbed on. 
26c Double supply, 35c Get Penetro. 



-^* 



Hard Blizzard 



In the terrible blizzard that 
swept the northwestern section of 
the United States in 1888, thou- 
sands of head of cattle, were fro- 
zen standing up on their feet in 
the fields. 



AT FIRST 

51GH0FA 



c 



use 666 



«66 TABLETS. SALVE. N05E DROPS 



Queer Names Bring Fine 

Zoroaster and Jupiter are the 
names of' two children of Buenos 
Aires, Argentina. Their parents 
were fined on the ground that they 
had no right to give them absurd 
names. 



/*" To relieve distress of M0NTHLY*\ 

Female Weakness 

Lydla E. Plnkham's Vegetable Com- 
pound Is made especially for women 
to help relieve periodic pain with its 
weak, tired, nervous, blue feelings 
— due to functional month]; dis- 
turbances. 

Taken regularly — Plnkham's Com- 
pound helps build up resistance 
against such symptoms. Here Is a 
product that helps nature and 
that's the kind to buy) Famous for 
almost a century. Thousands upon 
thousands of women have reported 
benefits. Follow label directions. 
Worth, trying! 

LYDIALPINKHAM'S^^ 



So-Called Ice Plant 
The ice plant of California Is so 
called because glittering beads on 
its surface give it the appearance 
of being covered with ice. 



YOUR looks better groomed with 
u m in MoroJmeHairTonic Keeps 
HAIR unruly hair in place. 
alui . v - Gives lustre. Big bottle, 
ALWAYS on iy 25c Sold everywhere. 



In Ice Age 

During the ice age, walrus lived 
in what is now Florida , and moose 
thrived as far south as Kentucky. 



■WNU— E 



2-44 



Watch Youk 
Kidneys/ 



Help Them Cleanse the Blood 

of Harmful Body Waste 

Your kidneys are constantly filtering 
waste matter from the blood stream. Bat 
kidneys sometimes lag in their work — 4* 
not act as Nature Intended — fail to re- 



nter* impurities that, it retained, may 

C" ion the system and ttpsst the whole 
y machinery. 
Sy m p to ma may be nagging backa i 



persistent headache, attacks of c 
getting op nights, swelling, puffinsaa 
under the eyes — a feeling of nervosa) 
anxiety and loss of psp and strength. 

Other signs of kidney or bladder dis- 
order are sometimes burning, scanty *f 
too frequent urination. 

There should be no doubt that prompt 
treatment is wiser than neglect. Us* 
Doom's PilU. Dean's have been winning 
new friends for more than forty yean. 
They have a nation-wide reputation. 
Are recommended by grateful people tea 
country over. Alk year ewisMar/ 



DOAN SPILLS 



-% 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1144 



WALTON ADVERTISER 

(Established in 1014) 
KENTON-CAMPBELL COURIER — Established 1M7 
(Consolidate June 1, 1938) 



Entered as Second Class Matter January 1, 1918 
at the Post Office at Walton, Kentucky. 



MRS. J. R. WALLACE and WILLIAM W. JARRELL 
EDITORS and PUBLISHERS 



Foreign Advertishtr Representative: 

AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 




AL€0nOWAL. 
SSOCIATION 

3G3Eu 



Notices and Cards of Thanks: 
85 wards and less, 50 cents. Over 
85 words 81.00. 



MEMBER 

ENTUCKY PRES! 
ASSOCIATION, 

oiciJHMI J-tlri/m Hit 



MT. ZION 



Those on the sick list in this 
community are Mrs. Effie York, 
Mrs. Gladys Delph, Jo Ann Alex- 
ander and Q. A. Lawrence and Mr. 
End Mrs. Lon Gordon. 



Gwendolyn Perrell and Juanita 
Kuhn of Covington spent Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Harve Ferrell 
and family. Afternoon guests 
were Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ferrell 
and son of Covington. 

Mrs. Cora Greene has returned 
home after an extended visit with 



BANK OF INDEPENDENCE 

INDEPENDENCE -:- KENTUCKY 

Report of Condition at close of business December 31, 1943. 

ASSETS 

Cash, Balance with other banks and cash 

items in process of collection $112,340.33 

U. S. Government Obligations, direct and 

fully guaranteed .: 552,794.25 

State, County & Municipal obligations 10,000.00 

Other Bonds 25,761.00 

Loans & Discounts "..*.;. :... 167,084.54 

Banking House, Furniture & Fixtures .._ il2,500.00 

Other assets 172.16 

Total Assets $880,652.28 

LIABILITIES 

Demand Deposits ....* $486,252.00 

Savings Deposits 281,304.12 

Time Certificates of Deposit 29,764.39 

Certified and Cashiers checks 784.98 

Total Deposits $798,105.49 

Dividends declared but not yet payable 345.00 

Capital Stock !. 43,000.00 

Surplus Fund ....'. : 10,000.00 

Undivided Profits 11,001.79 

Other Reserves 18,200.00 

Total Liabilities ....$880,652.28 

MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



Courtesy and Co-operation 

Ha* enabled u* to become Increasingly valuable to the 
Public upon whose patronage we depend. 

V DIXIE STAT& BANK 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 

Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



PUBLIC SALE 

I have decided to quit farming and will sell to the 
high bidder on Bracht & Piner Road, one mile east 
of Bracht, known as the Curley Mullins farm, on 

SAL, JAN. 22 nd 

AT 10:00 A. M, (CWT) 

LIVESTOCK 

Team of extra good Work Horses, 5 & 6 years old, 
weight 1400 lb.; one 9-year old Gray Horse; seven 
good Milk Cows; 8 Heifers and one Guernsey Bull. 

TOOLS 

One Wagon; Mowing Machine; Hay Rake; Disk 
Harrow; Land Plow; Hill Side Plow; Rastus Plow; 
Laying Off Plow; 2 Coke Stoves; Wood Heater; 
four 10-gal. Milk Cans. 

FURNITURE 

Kitchen Cabinet; Davinett; Stand Table; Oil Stove 
with built-in oven; Ice Box; Liberty Heatrola; 
some Small Tools of all kinds and other things too 
numerous to mention. 

TERMS— CASH 
LUNCH WILL BE SERVED ON GROUND 

ELMER "PEASEL" SPAULDING 

OWNER, 

H. F. Johnson, Auctioneer— Phone Ind. 6196 
J. B. Doan, Clerk 



CONDENSED STATEMENT 



Peoples Deposit Bank 

. Burlington. Kentucky 

At the close of business December 31, 1943 

RESOURCES 

Leans and Mortgages $ 364,565.82 

U. S. Government Bonds t : 767,345.59 

Oth6f Bonds and Securities' .v. 131,069.00 

(At less than market 

Overdrafts ..»:- None 

Banking House and Lot 16,000.00 

Furniture and Fixtures 1.00 

Other Real Eetate 100 

Cash and Due From Banks 257,908.87 



Total : $1,536,891.28 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock $ 50,000.00 

SSrplus :..?. 100,000.00 

Undivided Profits 34,397.52 

Deposits > 1,352,493.76 

Total $1,536,891.28 

MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 

4% semi-annual dividends paid to stockholders June 30,th 
and December 31st 



TRUST DEPARTMENT 

3?_ 



SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 



SUGAR CREEK 



her daughter, Mr. and Mrs. H. P. 
Stephenson and family of Angola, 
New York, . 

Mrs. Melvon Miller and son 
visited Mr. and Mrs. Marion Gib 
son and daughter of Sherman last 
week. 

Donald Hopkins who has been 
in the U. S. Army in Panama is 
spending a 22-day furlough with 
friends and relatives here. His 
girl friend, Miss Betty Donaldson 
of Missouri is with him. This is 
the first time Donald has been 
home for seven years. He will go 
to Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., 
where he will re-enlist In the 
Army. 

Friends in this community are 
sorry to hear of Mrs. Nellie Dun- 
lap having pneumonia and in the 
hospital at Lexington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Doc Weddington 
of Covington spent the week-end 
with Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Jump 
and daughter. Sunday afternoon 
guests were: Mr. and Mrs. George 
McGuire of Covington. 

Mrs. Alice Collier and daughter 
attended her grandmother's fun- 
eral in Covington Wednesday. 



A WALTON MAN FELT 
LIKE SWOLLEN BALLOON; 
FULL OF STOMACH GAS 



METHODIST CHURCH 

Walton, 



Rev. C. O. Dearlng, Pastor 

Sunday School. . 1 0: a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Youth Fellowship 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Service 7:00 p. m. 



RICHWOO D PR ESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 



m. 



Bf. a. WUmi 

Sunday School, 10:00 a 
Morning Worship, 11:00 a. m.. 
Evening Worship, 7:00 p. m. 
Services every first and third 
Sundays, 



NEW BETHEL BAP. CHURCH 
Verona, Ky. 



REV. SHIRLEY SPAHR, Pastor 
Preaching services every 1st and 
3rd Sunday. 

Sunday School 10 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. 8 p. in. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

AH ttess given Central War time 



Mr. and Mrs. Elwood Noel and 
children of Indiana spent the 
week-end with his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Albert Noel. 

J. R. Grubbs of the U. S. Naval 
Station, Great Lakes, 111. is home 
on a leave. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Gross 
moved from the Jessie Turner 
farm to their farm. Monday. 

Mrs. Helen Shelton of Glencoe 
spent Thursday night with Mrs. 
Susie Shelton. 

J. B. Hendren of Cincinnati, 
Ohio spent several days on the 
Creek visiting friends last week. 

We are sorry to report Mr. 
Albert Noel on the sick list. 

Albert Orsborn, Warren Taylor 
and Heber Story delivered tobacco 
to Carrollton Wednesday. 

Cpl. Charles H. Miskell of 
Lacarne, Ohio called on his grand 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Clif- 
ton Sunday. 

Robert Clifton and sisters en- 
tertained as their guest Friday 
night, Mrs. Helen Shelton, Misses 
Fayetta Miskell and Ruby Cald- 
well of Glencoe, Bernad Griffin 
of Napoleon and Clyde Ellis. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eliza Beatty have 
moved to their new home at 
Harrison, Ohio. — 



Mrs. Grover Clifton and son 
entertaine as their guests Sunday, 
Mr. and Mrs. John Granger and 
children of Cincinnati, Ohio; Mr. 
and Mrs. C. J. Walick and Ben 
Sisson. 

We are sorry to report Mrs. Sam 
Combs very ill at this writing. 



51 



Most of your 



away: 



If most of your friends are 
away now — hi the service — 
doing war jobs— don't you 
feel left behind sometimes? 

Why not get in the midst of 
this war? Join the WAC! 

You can see new places, 
make new friends, learn in- 
teresting things — while you 
are doing vital work to speed 
victory. 

The Army needs your help 
urgently. This is your chance! 

For full details apply at the 
nearest C. S. Army Recruiting 
Station (your Jocai post office 
will give you the address) . 
Or write: The Adjutant Gen- 
eral, Room 4415, Munitions 
Building, Washington, D. C. 



UNION PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH 
M. A. WOmesherr, Pastor 
Sunday School, 11:00 a. m., X> 
W. T. 

Morning Worship, 12:00 N., E. 
W. T. 

Evening Service, 8:30 p. m., 
E. W. T. 

Services every second and forth 
Sundays. 



BEAVER LICK 



Born to Mr. and Mrs. Clifford 
Readnour of Mud Lick a fine son, 
Saturday at St. Elizabeth Hospital. 
He has been named Harry Layle. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Wilson 
are now operating the Hill Top 
Service Station. They will carry a 
full line of sandwiches, soft drinks, 
cigarettes, gas, oil and etc. 

Mrs. Harry Moore has been 
elected Bill Clerk in the State 
Senate and left last week for 
Frankfort to assume her duties. 

Don't forget there will be ser- 
vices at the Baptist Church, Sun- 
day, January 16th at 3 p. m. 
Everyone is Invited to attend. 



PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



Deposits Insured Under the Federal 
Deposit Insurance Corporation . . . 



Recently, a Walton man stated 
that he used to feel like a swollen 
balloon after every meal. He 
would bloat full of gas and spit 
up acidulous liquids for hours 
after eating. Was terribly con- 
stipated. This man is one of the 
hundreds in this vicinity who now 
praise ERB-HEP. He states he 
was amazed at the results when 
he took this medicine. Now 
he eats what he wants without gas 
or bloating, -and bowels are re- 
gular for the first time in years. 
He feels like a new man. 

ERB-HELP contains 12 Great 
Herbs; they cleanse bowles, clear 
gas from stomach, act on sluggish 
liver and kidneys. Miserable peo- 
ple soon feel different all over. So 
don't go one suffering 1 Get ERB- 
HELP. Jones Drug Store. 



Attend the Public Sale Friday, 
January 14th at one o'clock, to be 
held at the V. P. Kerns farm, one 
mile south of Walton. See his ad 
on another page of this paper. 



When In Covington 




at 

LANG'S CAFETERIA 

623-625 Madison Ave. 
Covington 



SELL YOUR TOBACCO 

with 

PEPPER-PEAK-FLORENCE TOBACCO WHSE. CO. 

PHONE 57 Cynthiana, Ky. PHONE 57 

WHERE YOU CAN GET A QUICK SALE 

5 - BIG HOUSES -- 5 

You Do Not Have To Register 
You can be unloaded rapidly at the house in front of the sale, thus assuring you a quick sale 

SOME OF OUR HIGH SCOP AVERAGES ARE AS FOLLOWS: 



Q Q 



EYESTRAIN 

I Are you conscious of a 
strain when you read fine 
print* 

Perhaps you need glasses. 
Consult us today. 

LJ.METZGER 

OptometrUt Opttciaa 

€31 Madison Ave. 

Covtngtoa 

Serving Northers Kentucky 
With Comfortable Evr«leht 



Lbs. Ave. 

Jack C. Martin & Earl Kearns 5274 $60.31 

Mrs. Marshall Bell & Felix King 10800 $60.02 

R. O. Haviland & Son. 4056 $59.14 

L. E. King 1884 $58.11 

Mrs, M. D. Martin & Harp. 5222 $57.16 

W. Ammerrrian & Bela Workman.. 5490 $57.59 

Tomsie Browning & Son... 1640 $57.27 

Alfred McMurtry & Tucker____ 1738 $57.29 

Felix E. King . 1610 $58.32 

Walter McCauley & Son 2596 $56.20 

Henry Judy __ ■.. 2632 $56.17 

Russell Stevens 2994 $56.41 

Raymond Florence .. ■ 5326 $56.42 

Leslie &. Stanley Pepper 4902 $57.92 

Mrs. Mary L. CBbk & Webb. 2574 $57.76 

J. C. Barnes & Son 2008 $56.26 

Wm. N. Humphrey 2328 $55.15 

Newt Kearns & Lemons 3162 $55.12 

H. C. & James Patterson 720 $56.00 

Mrs. Mayme McMurtry & Hill 2424 $55.45 

Rodney Kearns &. Mullen 2266 $55.37 

Charles & Albert Pulliam 1402 $55.33 

Mrs. Ora McNees & Furnish. 810 $55.53 

Jesse Northcutt 3482 $54.80 

J. N. Kimbrough & Son 4068 $54.38 

Richard Eals & Pope 3000 $55.45 

Gus Lang & Son ...^^ 4362 $55.22 

Clarence & Elmer Geoghegan 3416 $54.51 



Collis Maffett 1 

Roy & Norman Taylor : 

B. C. Dillon & Alva Parsons. 

Roy Taylor. -.. 

Roy Levi & Kearns. 



W. T. Courtney & Son- 
Sherman Goldie 



W. A. Gossett & Lanem 
Roy & Norman Taylor 
J. P . Deniston 



Mrs. L. D. Stewart A Soi 

R. M. Collnis & Fogle. 

Mrs. Russ Hickman & Dailey 

J. P. & L. P. Chamberlin & Son 

Harry Conyers 

Sam W. Arnold 



R. M. Collins & Son. 
Myers & Culley 



Clarence Teegarden & Son. 



Chas. W. & W. R. Jennings 

Mrs. Mary Current & Megibben. 
J. T. Gillig & True- 



Mrs. Laura Conner & Wiggins. 
Leo Dryden 



O. C. Laughlin & Snapp. 
Harvey Palmer & Son. 



Mrs. Pearl Craig & Bowman 
J. W. Showalter & Glasscock 



Lbs. 


Ave. 


1308 


$54.28 


3462 


$54.81 


2100 


$58.00 


5956 


$55.87 


5882 


$55.25 


2114 


$55.08 


4890 


$55.15 


3564 


$56.30 


1638 


$55.84 


2118 


$56.40 


1048 


$56.52 


2664 


$56.02 


2054 


$55.87 


1978 


$55.61 


742 


$56.36 


1566 


$56.14 


1088 


$56.56 


450 


$56.37 


1022 


$56.26 


7198 


$54.23 


5748 


$54.78 


5030 


$54.30 


2062 


$54.71 


4312 


$55.03 


2028 


$54.42 


706 


$54.39 


1424 


$54.83 


562 


$55.52 



YOU WILL FIND US ON THE FLOORS AT ALL TIMES LOOKING OUT FOR 
YOUR INTERESTS WHEN TOBACCO IS BEING GRADED AND SOLD 

J. R. PEAK ROSS C. PEPPER VIRGIL D. FLORENCE W. B. TUCKER 

Phone 136 Phone 418-w Phone 406 Phone 278 



PUBLIC SALE 

Having sold my farm on Dixie Highway, one mile 
South of Walton, Ky., I will sell on the above farm 
at Public Auction, on 

FRIDAY, JAN. 14, 1944 

AT ONE O'CLOCK (EWT) 
THE FOLLOWIN^: 
30,000 ft. of lumber, all kinds 2x4 - 2x6 - 2x10 etc. ; 
thirty-seven squares of galvanized siding, never 
been used; locust posts; 200 bu. white corn in crib; 
thirty shocks of good corn on Matthew Cleek Farm 
near Verona, Ky.; alfalfa hay and mixed hay; 40 
head of two and three year year old Ewes, these 
Ewes are home raised, also two 3-year old Rams, 
and some Farm Implements. 

V. P. KERNS 

TeiTFlprenefc 20 — Florence, Ky. 
LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



I 



■■■ {*$ 






"S 



THURSDAY, JANUARY IS, 1944 



m^fttk iiii»^V*»ii«i^w»» 



WALTON ADVERTISES 



I* 

SOCIAL AND 



f 

I 



PERSONAL, 

j w fjjp g »»^/t* " < ejftnj 



■ p^ ^W f* w< ^V" w ww * 1 M m^ — w *w%* 



James Albert Johnson, popular 
17 year old son of Mr .and Mrs. 
Albert Johnson of North Main 
Street has volunteered for the 
Navy and is in training at Oreat 
Lakes, HI. He is better known as 
"Jack" to his friends here. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C Johnson had 
as guests Sunday, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lawrence Wilson and daughter, 
Mary Kaye, Mr. and Mrs. M. O. 
Jones and son, corporal Carl M. 
Jones and wife. 

Corporal Carl Jones and wife 
Christine were called home by the 
death of her father, Mr. Rider of 
Warsaw. Carl will return to New 
River, North Carolina Thursday, 
but Mrs. Jones will remain here. 



Mr. and Mrs. Conner Littrell 
have received a letter from their 
son-in-law, Allen Boss, who was 
inducted into the U. S. Navy at 
Indianopolis, Indiana, in Dec. He 
is now at Oreat Lakes, HI. He has 
been given a test and is recom- 
mended for training as a first 
class machinest captain, however 
he won't get his rating until Feb. 
15th, then he expects to be sent 
elsewhere. His wife, Mrs Catherine 
L. Boss will live with her sister, 
Mrs. Jesse McMillian of Coving- 
ton for the duration. 

Helen Mann of Cincinnati spent 
the week-end with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Mann and 
daughter. 



m— Of ** ■ *flft>— M tf/i rmim %W<i m ^/itm rm ^f ^^m ^^t 





INVKTMIHT 



INSURED 




Buy WAR BONDS H«r«, 



Add to your savings 
for use after Hctoiy ' 

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 
OFCOVINGTON 

Ml MAIN STREET (Offlee Open Daily) 



Mr. P. H. Brown of Bellevlew 
was a pleasant visitor at the 
Advertiser Office Monday. 

Rev. and Mrs. Chas. Dearing 
entertained with seven o'clock 
dinner last Thursday evening ,for 
Rev. and Mrs. W. A. Wells of 
Latonia and Mr. and Mrs. C. O. 
Carlisle and son Guy Olen. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Stone are 
the proud parents of a son, weigh- 
ing 9 pounds, born Jan. 7th at 
Sooth Hospital, Covington. Mother 
and baby doing nicely. 

Mrs. Pascal Bush is spending a 
few days with her brother, Russell 
Henry and Mrs. Henry and their 
infant daughter, Charlotte Ann of 
Dayton, Ohio. 

Mrs. Aleen Conner returned 
home Monday from a delightful 
trip and visit with relatives and 
friends in Texas. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. P. Mann visit- 
ed his sister, Mrs. Cecil Blackweli 
and Mr. Blackweli of Erlanger, 
Sunday, Cecil Blackweli Jr. of the 
U. S. Navy was also present. 

Mrs. Mary Howe is spending 
some time with Mrs. O. T. Martin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Worthing- 
ton and daughter, Pat, spent 
Sunday with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. C. C. Worthington and 
family of Sherman, Kentucky. 

Mrs. Ora Pry received word that 
her daughter; Mrs! Ona Kephart 
has had a heart attack in Charles- 
ton, W. Va. where she now lives 
and is in the hospital there. 



GUITARS 



$15.00 up 

USED CLARINET, FIRST 

CLASS SHAPE, SILVER 

PLATED $45.00 

ROY ACUPP AND OTHER 
GUITAR, CORD AND IN- 
STRUCTION BOOKS. GIB- 
SON AND BLACK DIAMOND 
STRINGS FOR ALL INSTRU- 
MENTS. 

COMPLETE MUSICAL, 

WATCH AND CLOCK 

REPAIR 

. HANSER JEWELRY AND 
MUSIC CO. 

515 )-a Madison Ave. 
Covington -:- Kentucky 



HOW TO GET MORE LIGHT FROM YOUR PRESENT EQUIPMENT 



s 





Keep Lamps Turned Off 
In Unoccupied Rooms 

Leaving lamps burning in unoccupied rooms not only wastes 
light but shortens the life of lamp bulbs, which use tungsten 
— a critical war material. Turn off all lamps and fixtures 
promptly when not in actual use. Your lamp bulbs will stay 
brighter longer, you'll get more useful light at less expense 
•and you'll help conserve electricity and vital m**»ri*u f or die 
war effort. 

SIX OTHER WAYS TO CONSERVE LIGHT 



1 Remove and clean lamp bulbs 
' and lamp bowls regularly. Dry 
thoroughly before using again. 

9 Keep shade linings light Clean 
"" or brush regularly. Repaint or 
reline dark-colored paper or parch- 
ment shades. 

J Sit dose enough to the lamp 
•" to get all the help it can give 
Tour eyes. 



1 Avoid direct glare from lamp 
'* bulbs by using shades deep 
enough and wide enough. 

C Arrange furniture so one lamp 
*" can serve two people. But b« 
sure lamp is not too far away from 
either person. 

£ Eliminate amber or flame -dot 
•" bulbs. Inside-frosted white 
bulbs of same wattage give much 
more light 



COMMUNITY 

PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 



iNooaroaATi 





STATE NO. 73-763 
REPORT OF CONDITION OF 

Dixie State Bank 

of Walton in the State of Kentucky at the close of business 
on December 31, 1943 

ASSETS 
Loans and discounts (including $35.06 overdrafts ... $212,315.99 
United States Government obligations, 

direct and guaranteed ..228 900 00 

Cash, balance with other banks, including reserve 

balances, and cash items in process of collection 393,216.03 
Bank premises owned $12,300.00, 

furniture and fixtures $2,400.00 14,700.00 

Total Assets $849,132.02 

LIABILITIES 

Demand deposits of individuals, 

partnerships, and corporations $596,572.69 

Time* deposits of individuals, partnerships, 

and corporations 156,841.22 

Deposits of United States Government 

(including postal savings) 17,379.31 

Deposits of States and political subdivisions 14,323.55 

Other liabilities 1,000.00 

Total Liabilities (not including sub- 
ordinated obligations shown below) ... $786,116.77 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

Capital* $ 30,000.00 

Surplus 30,000.00 

Undivided profits 3,015.25 

Total capital Accounts "...?.......;.. .....: 63,015.25 " 

Total Liabilities and Capital Accounts $849,132.02 
•This bank's capital consists of 500 shares common stock with 
total par value of $30,000.00. 

MEMORANDA 

31. Pledged assets (and securities loaned) (book value): 

(a) U. S. Government obligations, direct and 
guaranteed, pledged to secure deposits 
and other liabilities $202,500.00 

(e) TOTAL $202,500 00 

32. Secured and preferred liabilities: 

(a) Deposits secured by pledged assets pur- 
suant to requirements of law $ 16,206.25 

(e) TOTAL $ 16,206.25 

34. (a) On date of report the required legal re- 
serve against deposits of this bank was $ 48,484.48 

(b) Assets reported above which were eligible 

as legal reserve amounted to $393,216 03 

I, Chas. W. Thompson, Cashier, of the above-named bank, 
do solemnly swear that the above statement is true, and that 
it fully and correctly represents the true state of the several 
matters herein "contained and set forth, to the best of my 
knowledge and belief. 

Correct— Attest: CHAS. W. THOMPSON. 

GEORGE W. BAKER, 

WALTER D. VEST, 

A. H. GAINES, Directors. ^ 

State of Kentucky, County of Boone, ss: 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 11th day of January, 
1944, and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director 
of this bank. 

My commission expires May 8, 1946. Olive Johnson, Notary 
Public. 

w~- ~~ ; — 



Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Chapman of 
Verona have sold their farm anil, 
purchased the home formerly 
owned by Mr. and Mrs. Bruce 
Franks on Verona Road, near the 
edge of Walton. We are pleased to 
welcome these fine people to our 
town. . 

Miss Susan Pursley of Dixie 
Heights was the Sunday guest of 
Martha Wallace. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. Morgan and 
baby were week-end guests of his 
parents at pwenton, Kentucky. 

Mrs. Bruce Franks of the Town 
and" Country Shop returned, from 
the hospital recently and is im- 
proving at her home on N. Main 
St. It is hoped she will soon be 
able to return to her store. 

Pvt. Lonnie May Jr. of Indian- 
town Gap, Perm, was the recent 
guest of Miss Jean Ashcraft of 
South Walton. 



CONCORD 



WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Wafton, Ky. 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 6:30 p. m 

Evening 'Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed., 7:30 p. m. 



"Abhor that which is evil, cleave 
to that which Is good." 

Rev. G. N. Smith and Rev. Dan 
Thomas were entertained in the 
James Beach home Sunday. All 
enjoyed hearing this young man 
from Georgetown College. 

The sale at the D. R. Chapman 
home Saturday was well attend- 
ed and the things sold brought 
good prices,. They have bought 
a home in Walton and will, move 



NEW JAMES 
THEATRE 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 

SHOW EACH AND EVERT NITB 
AT 7:30 CENTRAL WAR TIME. 
SUNDAY MATINEE AT 8:3t 
CENTRAL WAS TIME. BAR- 
GAIN NIGHTS MONDAY AND 
THURSDAY. 




'V Is For 
Vision 

Everybody has a part in the 
drive for VICTORY. Good eye- 
sight is of vital importance. Eye 
strain and defective vision keeps 
a person below normal, when it 
is his or her patriotic duty to feel 
as well and strong as possible. 

Come in today and have your 
eyes examined. 

FRANK RIGGS 

Optometrist 
Pike * Russell Covington, Ky. 



All chlldrea regardless ef age 
must have a ticket for each shew. 
No parkin* allowed west of side- 
walk in front of Theatre or f flltng 
station adjoining. Polios Orders. 



Mickey Rooney - Judy Garland 

GIRL CRAZY 

FBI. * SAT., JAN 14-15th 



m i n fynt e> ■ iJjft i> ■ i « ,% 



»».«wLi 



J. L HAMILTON & SON 



FUNERAL SERVICE 

VERONA -t- KEN T UUK I 



■ 

I 




there soon. We will miss them 
here, but wish them success in 
their new home. 

The farmers are still stripping 
tobacco and some delivering, it is 
bringing a good price. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Robinson 
were calling on Mr. and Mrs. 
Allen Imgley near Florence Wed- 
nesday. Mr. Imgley has been very 
sick for sometime. 

Stanley Robinson and Ross 
Chapman were visiting the radio 
shop at Williamstown Wednesday. 



Stanley purchased a new radio. 

We were glad to see Carmel 
Webster out for Church Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Kannady 
entertained their daughter and 
family from Cincinnati Sunday. 

The Y. W. A's. and Sunbeams 
will meet at the Church Saturday 
afternoon. All members are urged 
to attend and any new members 
are welcome. 

Sunday School each Sunday at 
10:30. Come and bring others with 
you. 



Bud Abbott - Lou Costello 

IT AINTHAY 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 16th 



Joan Davis - Jinx Falkenburg 

TWO SENORITAS FROM 
CHICAGO 

MONDAY, JANUARY 17th 



See one of the greatest pictures of 
the year 

THIS UNO IS MINE 

with 
Charles Laughton - Moreen 

O'Hara 
TUES. & WED., JAN 18-19th 



Vera Dale - Wm. Lundigan 

HEADIN FOR GODS 

COUNTRY 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 20th 



STATE NO. 73-625 



REPORT OFCONDITION OF 

VERONA BANK 

of Verona in the State of Kentucky at the close 
of business on December 31st, 1943. 



$ 57,683.60 



ASSETS 
Loans and discounts (including $5.72 overdrafts) 
United States Government obligations, 

direct and guaranteed , 112,200.00 

Obligations of States and political subdivisions 5,500.00 

Other bonds, notes, and debentures 1,899.03 

Cash, balance with other banks, including reserve 

balances, and cash items in process of collection 48,297.96 
Bank premises owned $800.00, furniture 

and fixtures $500.00 1,300.00 

Other assets c 941.74 



Total Assets $227,822.33 

LIABILITIES 

Demand deposits of Individuals, partnerships, 

and corporations „. $140,167.73 

Time deposits of individuals, partnerships, 

and corporations 1z.. 49,842.88 

Deposits of United States Government 

(including postal savings) ...-. 5,627.20 

Deposits of States and political subdivisions 193.44 

Total Deposits $195,831.25 

Other liabilities 249.00 



Total Liabilities (not including sub- 
ordinated obligations shown below) ... $196,080.25 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

Capital* • % 21,600.00 

Surplus 5,000.00 

Undivided profits 1,183.66 

Reserves (and retirement account for preferred 

capital) 3 958.42 

Total Capital Accounts 31,742.08 



Total Liabilities and Capital Accounts $227,822.33 
•This bank's capital consists of 792 shares first preferred 
stock with total par value of $6,600.00, total retirable value 
$6,600.00; 600 shares second preferred stock with total par 
value of $7,500.00, total retirable value $7,500.00; and 600 
shares common stock with total par value of $7,500.00. 

MEMORANDA 

31. Pledged assets (and securities loaned) (book value) : 
(a) U S. Gvernment obligations, direct and 
guaranteed, pledged to secure deposits 
and other liabilities $ 45.000.00 



33. 



34. 



(e) TOTAL $ 45,000.00 

Subordinated obligations: 

(a) Unpaid dividends on preferred stock and 
unpaid interest on capital notes and 
debentures, accured to end of last 
dividend or interest period, not included 
in liabilities or reserves above $ 249.00 

(a) On date of report the required legal re-, 

serve against deposits of this bank was ... 11,713.46 

(b) Assets reported above which were eligible 

as legal reserve amounted to 48,297.96 

I, O. K. Whitson, Cashier, of the above-named bank, do 
solemnly swear that the above statement is true, and that it 
fully and correctly represents the true state of the several 
matters herin conained and set forth, to the best of my 
knowledge and belief. 

Correct— Attest: , O. K. Whitson. 

W. G. Renaker, G. C. Ransom, and Arch Noell, Directors. 

State of Kentucky, County of Boone, ss: 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 11th day of January, 
1944, and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director 
of this bank. • 

My commission expires Dec. 10, 1944, A. C. Roberts, Notary 
Public. 



USED CARS-20 EAST FOURTH ST. 

Covington COlonial 3884 

1937 (Two) Studebaker Coupes $350 

1937 Oldsmobile Coach $375 

1937 Dodge Coach , ;_ $350 

1936 Cadillac $325 

1939 Hudson 4-door ' S $695 

1938 Oldsmobile Sedan $445 

1937 Ford Coupe .... $295 

1937 Chrysler Sedan . $295 

1936 Nash Sedan $265 

1939 Dodge 4-door Sedan -_ $695 

1936 Packard Sedan : $275 

1937 Packard Coupe : ,_ $345 

1936 Chevrolet Sedan $245 

1938 Willys Sedan __ . __ $325 

1937 Willys Sedan $275 

65 MORE FROM $60 UP 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



Thursday, January 13, 1944 



WEEKLY NEWS ANALYSIS 



Nazis Reel Under Combined Pressure 
Of Heavy Air Attacks and Sea Losses; 
New Air Blows Strike Japs in Pacific; 
Fifth Army Steps Up Assaults in Italy 

(EDITOR'S NOTE: When opinion* are «nr«wd In thus column*, they are those ef 
Western Newspaper Unior-'e saws analysts and not necessarily sf this newspaper.) 

_^^__^____^ Released by Western Newspaper Union. . 




New Britain — Map show* points of U. S. landings on New Britain 
Island at Arawa on south and Cape Gloucester on north. (See: South- 
■t Pacific.) 

SOUTHWEST PACIFIC? 
Bombings Jar Japs 



INVASION: 
Eisenhower Commands 

Hitler' ■ high command shuttled 
troops in western Europe.as Amer- 
ica's four-star Gen. D wight D. Eis- 
enhower assumed command of Al- 
lied forces and the stage was set for 
the big second front. 

Britain's Air Chief Marshal Ar- 
thur Tedder stood at General Eis- 
enhower's side as deputy command- 
er, with Britain's Arim. — Bertram 
Ramsay as the leader of naval 
forces, and Britain's Air Marshal 
Trafford Leigh-Mallory in charge of 
all air forces. 

As the Allies* supreme command 
buried itself in the mass of Invasion 
detail, the tensed Germans reported 
heavy aerial bombardment of their 
channel fortifications and Comman- 
do attacks along the French coast 
to test their defense. As the Ger- 
mans awaited the grand assault, 
■aid Nazi Marshal Erwin Rommel: 
Our defenses are technically cor- 
rect. 

FORTRESS EUROPE: 
Step Up Action 

Bringing heavy artillery Into play, 
Lieut. Gen. Mark Clark's Fifth army 
blasted the Nazis from strong points 
blocking the 75-mile road to Rome, 
while farther to the east, the British 
clambered past the enemy's Adri- 
atic bnstion of Ortona, won after 
more than a week of vicious street- 
to-street fighting. 

As U. S. and British troops 
punched their way through the 
Nazis' stiff mountain defenses in 




Germany's Scharnhorst. 

southern Italy, aerial and naval war- 
fare in Europe stepped up. 

Fleets of Allied bombers winged 
their way over the English channel 
to pound Nazi fortifications along 
the French coast, and the RAF 
rained another 2,234 tons of explo- 
sives on battered, hapless Berlin. 

Following the British home fleet's 
■inking of the 26,000-ton Nazi battle- 
ship Scharnhorst off North Cape, 
Norway, light Allied and 'German 
, naval units tangled in the Atlantic 
off the French coast, with airplanes 
being called into play to help sink 
three enemy destroyers and a 
speedy blockade runner. 

RUSSIA: 

Reds Advance 

Delivering trip-hammer blows all 
along the 800-mile Russian front, 
Red armies surged forward again 
In the south as Germany's harassed 
high command shifted forces to 
check the big push. 

The Reds' heavy blows In the 
south fell as German resistance stiff- 
ened, in the north around Vitebsk. 
Quickly shifting the gravity of their 
attack, the Russ struck on a 110- 
mile front in the south, first punch- 
ing hard at Zhitomir, then punching 
•till harder above that railway hub 
•t Koresten. 

This winter's Russian offensive 
was a real slugging match, with each 
side in the south primarily con- 
cerned with exhausting the other, 




FOOD: 
Chickens, Points 

As the War Food administration 
requisitioned 170 million pounds of 
dressed chicken and fowl for the 
government, OPA slashed point 
values on canned vegetables and or- 
dered frozen vegetables point-free. 

WFA's action was prompted by 
the government's inability to obtain 
more than 20 per cent of the fowl 
they required in recent months, and 
the army was said to be particularly 
anxious to get the poultry for Sun- 
day dinners at camp and hospital 
diets. Civilians may be little affect- 
ed by WFA's order, however, since 
it does not apply to stock stored 
after December 30, 1943. r 

Because of comfortable stocks of 
canned green and wax beans, zero 
point values were established for 
them. A 10 per cent reduction in 
consumer demands for canned peas 
and tomatoes during the last two 
months led OPA to chop their point 
values for No. 2 and 2% cans to 15. 
In an attempt to move frozen vege- 
tables from storage to make room 
for record pork stocks, all point 
values were removed. 

RAILROADS: 
Strike Off 

Seeking to avert a threatened 
strike after the switchmen, conduc- 
tors and firemen and enginemen had 
refused his offer to arbitrate their 



•61 



rtv 



Washington, D. C. 
LITTLE PIGS GO TO MARKET 

Agriculture officials are staring 
with bulging eyes at the telegrams 
received from the livestock markets. 
The number of hogs killed in a sin- 
gle day has passed the figure of 
300,000, and is still going up. 

Novemberhas already set an all- 
time record* In hog slaughter of 
5,900,000 (federally inspected). De- 
cember will go still higher. Cattle 
slaughter also set a record In No- 
vember, but is now tapering off. Not 
so with hogs. 

Nothing like this has ever hap- 
pened in the history of the world. 
Nature, plus a low ceiling price on 
corn and the delay in putting a ceil- 
ing price on hogs, is now scatter- 
ing pork all over the landscape. This 
will continue through January, Feb- 
ruary, and into the month of March. 

In spite of the pork flood, however, 
there is no surplus, and officials in- 
sist that there must be no "holiday" 
from rationing. OPA and War Food 
administration agree on this. They 
have had many differences in the 



II Washington Di9est 



Germany's 'Second Army' 
Is Nazi Way of Total War 



SON 



wage, demands, against the car-iqr*, past; but they stand together on the 



Gen. Krtieger 



Japan'* great air and shipping 
base of Rabaul on New Britain 
came within closer 
range of U. S. bomb- 
ing planes with the 
marines' capture of 
two air strips on 
Cape Gloucester on 
the western end of 
the island."" 

Following up 
heavy bombing 
which helped crum- 
ple the enemy's 
strong line of pill- 
boxes, the marines 
stormed remaining 
Jap positions with 
flame throwers. As the marines 
advanced at Cape Gloucester, ele- 
ments of Lieut. Gen. Walter Krue- 
ger's Sixth army encountered heavy 
resistance at Arawe to the south. 

The Allies made increasing use of 
air power to jar the Japs loose on 
the wide Pacific front, dropping gas- 
oline tanks on enemy strong point* 
on Bougainville and sending fleets 
of bombers to pound installations on 
the Marshall Islands. 

AGRICULTURE: 
Meat Production 

Farmers received an all-time high 
of four billion dolla'rs for livestock 
slaughtered under federal inspection 
in 1943 as meat production also 
reached an all-time high of more 
than 24 billion pounds. 

Fifty per eent more meat was pro- 
duced than during the 10-year pre- 
war average, but after allocations 
to the government, civilian con- 
sumption was held to the prewar 
rate of 132 pounds per person. Be- 
cause of rationing, however, sup- 
plies were more evenly distributed 
than formerly. 

Meat output for 1944 was estlmat- 

• ed at 25 billion, 600 million pounds, 

of which 8 billion, 500 million pounds 

will be required for military and 

lend-lease purposes. 

CCC Program 

To help stimulate production and 
fulfill commitments to support crop 
and livestock prices, the Commod- 
ity Credit corporation spent 3% bil- 
lion dollars during the 1943 fiscal 
year. 

As of December 18, CCC possessed 
32,898,338 bushels of wheat under 

1942 loan, while 96,101,516 bushels 
were redeemed. CCC wheat stocks 
at that date totaled 86,928,000 
bushels. 

Principal objective of the CCC« 

1943 program was to increase the 
production of vegetable oils, dairy 
and poultry products and meats, and 
at the same time to underwrite OPA 
price ceilings. 

U. S. NAVY: 
42 Carriers 

The t5» S. finds itself well equipped 
as naval operations throughout the 
world quicken, with Uncle Sam's 
navy boasting of 42 aircraft carriers, 
including sleek destroyer-escorts for 
protecting convoys. The U. S. start- 
ed the war with seven. 

Corsair and Hellcat. fighter planes 
taking off from the carriers' decks 
have increased their striking power, 
and a deadly new dive bomber has 
been put in service. During 1943, 
the navy trained twice as many pi- 
lots as in 1942, and three times as 
many combat planes were sent to 
the front 

During 1943,- arming of merchant 
ships was speeded, 4,000 now being 
outfitted with weapons. 



President Roosevelt quickly seized 
the nation's railroads for the gov- 
ernment. 

Representing about 150,000 men, 
the three unions had balked at pres- 
idential intervention even after the 
trainmen and engineers accepted 
FDR's proposal, as a result of which 
they received an overall pay in- 
crease of 9 cents an hour. 

Also accepting FDR's offer at the 
last minute were the 45 non-operat- 
ing railroad unions representing 
1,150,000 employees, who suddenly 
agreed to a former government pro- 
posal of pay increases ranging from 
10 cents an hour for the lowest paid 
to 4 cents an hour for the highest 
paid, but also insisted on overtime 
compensation past 40 hours. 

Biggest Year 

Nineteen hundred and forty-three 
was the greatest year in the history 
of' American railroads. 

(1) 725 billion ton-miles of freight 
were handled, a ton-mile equaling 
one ton hauled one mile. 

(2) Passenger traffic totaled 85 bil- 
lion passenger miles. 

(3) Gross earnings exceeded 9 bil- 
lion dollars, although net operating 
income amounted to 1 billion, 385 
million dollars. 

LEND-LEASE: 
Aid to Russia 

With many of its great industrial 
cities razed and natural resources 
overrun, 3% billion dollars of lend- 
lease assistance bolstered Soviet 
Russia in its critical hours. 

To the Russ, the U. S. has sent 
nearly 7,000 planes, 3,500 tanks, 130,- 
000 sub-machine guns, 150,000 trucks, 
25,000 jeeps, 225,000 field telephones, 
and 750,000 miles of field telephone 
wire. . ....... .. 

In addition, the U. S. has sent 
1.000JB00 tons of steel, 350,000 tons 
of non-ferrous metal, 400,000 tons of 
chemicals, 600,000 tons of petroleum 
products, and more than 18,000 
metal cutting tools. 

Besides sending wheat, flour, 
meats, fats and oils, the U. S. also 
has supplied 10,000 tons of seeds to 
Russ farmers. 



Traffic Toll Drops 



On the basis of reports for 11 
months, the National Safety Council 
estimated that America's traffic 
death toll for 1943 would reach 23,000, 
13,000 below the prewar year 1941. 

The north central region of the 
V. S. showed the sharpest decrease 
for the 11 month period, with 29 per 
cent less fatalities than in the simi- 



matter of red points. 

Fact is, they have debated remov- 
ing pork from rationing, but ran 
into so much prospective grief that 
they gave it up. For if housewives 
could buy pork without stamps, they 
would use their stamps for beef and 
butter, which are still short Or if 
OPA tied the points to the product, 
making separate stamps for pork, 
others for beef, and others for but- 
ter, -etc^ -there wotdd be outcries 
from different groups, such as Jew- 
ish people, who ban pork. 

Conclusion is that the ration books 
must be left alone, and the only way 
to solve the bounty problem is to 
make federal purchases heavier and 
move them more rapidly. 

Army purchases of beef were ex- 
tremely heavy in the beef months 
of September through November. To- 
day, Lend Lease purchases of pork 
are growing heavy and will hold up 
through the "hog run" now flooding 
the market 

But this does not always take the 
meat out of storage. Lend Lease 
shipments to Russia can be made 
only when Russia is ready to eat 
the pork, since they have no storage 
space. Britain, on the other hand, 
can store pork, and is taking ship- Abteilung"— storm troopers. 



Storm Troopers. Elite Guard Are Backbone 

Of Hitler's Special Military Forces; 

Every Third German in Uniform. 




By BAUKHAGE 

New$ Analyst and Commentator. 



WNU Service, Union Trust Building, 
Washington, D. C. 

As I walk down Pennsylvania ave- 
nue these brisk winter days with all 
the sharp reminders of history about 
me — General Jackson there on his 
horse, tip-tilted in the air with his 
charger pawing the heavens, in the 
center of Lafayette park; the thea- 
ter on the spot where Seward was 
attacked as part of the plot that laid 
Lincoln low; and across the road, 
the White House with its kaleido- 
scope of history— I wonder about the 
year ahead of us. 

Are we going to face a casualty 
list of 400,000. Americans in the next 
2% months? 

1° have watched the President 
closely at the last press and radio 
conferences since he returned from 
Cairo and Teheran. I have noted a 
seriousness in his mien that I have 
not seen before. Be said, when he 
was asked what Stalin was like: he 
is a realist, like me. 

And in the last few days, as I 
have talked with officials, I flndthis 
same note creeping into their con- 
versations. Is America standing at 
Gethsemane, with the supreme sac- 
rifice to come? 

The great boast of Americans is 
that we are realists, that we are 
not to be led astray by starry-eyed 
dreamers. And yet the last thing 
that America is willing to look at is 
the bare facts. 

Here are some of them: the Al- 
lies have one army apiece — the 
armed forces. The Reich has two— 
the armed troops and the uniformed 
"second army" (as early as 1939, an 
association 'of German tailors ad- 
mitted that every third German was 
in uniform). 

The Storm Troopers 

First there is the "SA"— "Sturm 




HIGHLIGHTS 



in the week'* newt 



INSURANCE: British maritime 
insurance companies have reduced 
the war risk rates on cargoes to and 
from the United Kingdom to about 
half the former rate, reflecting the 
greater security of the seas. 

RESTAURANTS: The nation's 
restaurants, hard pressed by food 
restrictions and difficulties in keep- 
ing employees, are serving 25 mil- 
lion persons daily. 



PRESSURE COOKERS: The gov 
eminent has taken pressure cook 
ers off the ration list but all pur 
chasers will be required to specify 
that they intend to use the cookers 
for preserving food. Retailers have 
been instructed to take the custom- 
er's word for it Those wanting 
cookers for other purposes must 
make application with the War Food 
administration office in Washington. 






This was a fatal accident. 

lar period last year. The mountain 
region recorded a drop of 28 per 
cent, the south central 24 per cent, 
the north Atlantic 22 per cent, 
and the Pacific 6 per cent 

Mount Vernon, N. Y., was the 
largest city in the country without 
a fatality in the first 11 months ol 
1943, while among cities of 250,001 
population or more, St. Louis report- 
ed the biggest decline of 52 per cent 
and Philadelphia the smallest with 
1 per cent. _ 

OPA UPHELD 

Officials of the Office of Price Ad- 
ministration in replying to a house 
committee charge that the OPA was 
guilty of "usurpation and abuse ol 
its powers" pointed out that tto 
courts have upheld the OPA order* 
in nearly all tests. 

Out of 4,991 cases to the end ol 
September, the courts have ren- 
dered decisions favorable to the 
OPA in all but 291 actions, official! 
said. They also denied that OPA 
regulations have caused "wide' 
spread business failures." 



ments faster than the rate of use. 

With livestock production high, 
and submarine sinkings low, more 
beef and pork are getting to Allied 
fighting forces overseas than ever 

before. 

• • • 

MORE STRIKES AHEAD 

There are a lot more strikes in 
the country than the public is aware 
of. The government has abandoned 
the policy of regular announcements 
of the number of strikes and the 
number of man-hours lost. Thus the 
strikes do not get into the news- 
papers. 

But here are some figures which 
reveal that the no-strike pledge of 
labor organizations is not very ef- 
fective. 

In November alone, there were 120 
strikes. The December figure will 
be only slightly lower. In the week 
before Christmas, 91,000 man-days 
were lost in plants engaged in war 
production. Two days before Christ- 
mas, 21,000 people were out on 
strike, and a number of critical 
items were behind schedule. 

Some of the strikes have no rela- 
tion to wages. Take for example 
the strike which Washington officials 
refer to as "the Baltimore back- 
house strike." The Western Electric 
plants at Baltimore are producing 
such highly important items as ma- 
rine cables and radar wire. But 
white workers went on strike be- 
cause white and colored workers did 
not have separate toilet facilities. 

The war department was obliged 
to step in last week and take over 
the plants— solely because of toilet 
trouble. Workers began coming back 
slowly, but four days after the plants 
were taken over, over half the 
workers were still out 

Unfortunately, there is every prob- 
ability that strikes will increase, 
rather than decrease in the future. 
Next in line demanding wage in- 
creases will be aircraft steel and 
shipyard workers. John L. Lewis' 
victory broke the line, has stimu- 
lated demands for increases in many 
industries. 

After the President yielded to 
Lewis, George Harrison, railroad 
brotherhoods chief, visited the White 
House and said: "For Gawd's sake, 
you give it to your enemies, why 

not to your friends?" 

• • • 

MERRY GO-ROUND 

C. President Rios of Chile recently 
told newsmen he expected to visii 
the United States. This plan is now 
set aside, due to the grave situatior 
in Argentina and Bolivia. 
C. The Germans now make mines ol 
plastic, which cannot be located bj 
magnetic detectors. They ar* re 
ported to have sowed a dense mine 
field along the coast of Franci 
to head off the second front. 
ft Army has a special course of in- 
struction for cooks serving in cold 
climates — Alaska, Iceland, etc. 
ft Senator Wiley of Wisconsin, re- 
cently leading a visitor through the 
labyrinthine subway of the Capitol 
building, said: 'Til take you through 
the catacombs— and they might real- 
ly be the catacombs to judge by the 
smelt" 



They started from a nucleus of 
"bouncers" who kept order when 
the Nazis had their early meetings 
before they came into power. By 
1932, this group had grown to three 
million men — Roehm's "brown 
shirt" army. Roehm, you recall, 
was purged. This great organiza- 
tion was then theoretically liquidat- 
ed but the forces which made its 
organization possible remained. In 
1936, there was still a great organi- 
zation (disarmed, except for a dag- 
ger inscribed "all for Germany") 
which had a well-organized adminis- 
tration with 637 regiments— perhaps 
less than 700,000— still a goodly "sec- 
ond army" in itself. In 1939, this 
group, with nothing really official to 
do, was given specific duties, among 
them "responsibility" for the mili- 
tary training of all German youth, 
as well as "responsibility" in ca- 
tastrophes and any national or' lo- 
cal emergency. 

But that is only the foundation of 
the Nazis' "second army." 

The "SS" is the elite. "SS" stands 
for "Schutzstaffeln" — usually re- 
ferred to as the "elite guard." These 
are the men whom Hitler has tried 
to forge into a new aristocracy. I 
can best tell of their training in the 
words of a former prisoner in an 
Austrian concentration camp, whom 
I know personally. He is not a Jew, 
but a full-blooded Teuton. He told 
me that from personal observation, 
when he had been forced to work in 
an "SS" training camp, the train- 
ing of the "SS" men was just as 
brutal its the discipline of the prison- 
ers except, of course, the bodies of 
the "SS" cadets were not injured to 
the point of rendering them useless. 
Strong anti-Nazi prisoners were 
hung up by their wrists with their 
hands behind their backs until their 
chest and shoulder muscles were 
torn apart This, of course, would 
not be done to an "SS" man since it 
would render him unfit to serve the 
Fuehrer. But the "SS" cadets were 
beaten in the face with riding whips 
and pounded as mercilessly with 
whips and staves. 

Backbone Group* 

A part of the "SS" is part of the 
fighting army too. With complete* 
divisions, infantry, armor, all the 
rest. 



there are many ramifications which 
are strictly under the party con- 
trol—the Nazi transportation corps 
—three separate air groups, the fa- 
mous "Todt" organization ("todt" 
means death in German but in this 
case it is a man's name). This is a. 
great construction (and now, after 
the bombing, reconstruction) organi- 
zation, the boys who parade with 
shovels instead of guns. 

There are several others— the 
Labor service, trained in camps 
(something like the old CCC camps 
in this country); then come the va- 
rious welfare, women's and youth 
organizations. 

This deep regimentation (remem- 
ber, one out of three in uniform) is 
the Nazi way of creating a total 
war that is total. When the German 
armies are beaten, these organiza- 
tions will still remain. They can 
work on after defeat unless they are 
uprooted. , , 

A fuller realization of this prob- 
lem may make it easier for Ameri- 
cans to understand why, after his 
latest trip to Europe, the President 
is in, sober mien, why the high 
army officials and the civilians who 
know this problem intimately, hope 
that civilian America will not wax 
overconfident on the eve of military 

victory. 

• • • 

Status of Fascism 

tn Spain 

One of the things that was not dis- 
cussed by the "Big Three" or the 
"Big Four" in the recent meetings 
at Cairo and Teheran, as far as the 
world knows, was Spain. 

The President, in answer to a 
direct question when he returned, 
said he did not see Franco. He ad- 
mitted, however, that something de- 
layed his return. He never said 
what. 

There have been signs that some- 
one has been whispering into Gen- 
eralissimo Franco's ear just the 
same. 

He has disbanded the Falangists. 
They are the uniformed party mem- 
bers, a real military and hard-fisted 
bunch of uniformed fascists, the ac- 
tive party members of the Spanish 
fascismo. 

I saw a few in Spain. They were 
polite to me as a foreigner but they 
were not pleasant people. The ones 
I met in the ranks were raw, un- 
tutored youths, anxious for tips; 
glad, ' I would imagine, in that 
wrecked nation, to get food and a 
suit of clothes from the government. 

There is nothing more hardboiled, 
of course, than a hardboiled youth. 
Take away from him the decent out- 
lets for his animal spirits— on the 
ball field, in the school yard, any- 
where where he can whoop and hol- 
ler and be himself— and what hap- 
pens? A terrific, pent-up force, all 
the primitive emotions seeking an 
outlet. The Nazis and the fascists 
knew this and their strength is still 
in the strength of the youth they 
perverted: the primal instincts of 
the caveman, which lurk within all 
of us, turned to the base uses of 
the party. 

Well, Spam, a nation of individu- 
alists, has at last been able to shake 
itself loose from part of this bond- 
age. The iron hand of Hitler, and 
the now withered hand of Mussolini, 
have been withdrawn. Spanish fas- 
cismo is almost an empty shell. 

It is an axiom that fascism can 
only live on blood, the blood of its 
enemies and when they are not 
within reach, its own people. It has 
no other sustenance — it represents 
that group which, in the lower ani- 
mals; produces the outlawed, the lo- 
coed, the mad. We have these phe- 
nomena among the wolves, among 
elephants, even among horses — the 
"bad elephant" the tiger which kills 
for pleasure and not for food. 

Starved to Death 

So Spanish fascism has been 
starved to death and the essential, 
decent instincts of civilized man are 
again coming to the surface. 
' In this great struggle of the ideolo- 
gies, it has taken force to beat down 
force. It has taken a realization 
that human beings, banded together 



&g* 




VOU'LL see this set in the very 
, * best places this winter— they're 
second to none in good looks. Cro- 
chet the smart pill-box hat of black 
wool and please — do the separate 
flowers in pink! -The pink and 
black combination with; the match- 
ing mittens are lovely with a bea- 
ver coat — or a fur coat of any sort. 
This is distinctly a gala dress-up 
set to wear with your very 
best winter clothes and it has no 
age limit. 

The hat and mittens are as at- 
tractive on the chic gray-haired 
woman as they are on the college 
girl! 

• e • 

To obtain complete crocheting instruc- 
tions for the Pink-Flower Hat and Mitten 
Set (Pattern No. 5644) send 16 cents In 
cola, your name and address and the pat. 
tern number. 

Due to an unusually large demand and 
current war conditions, slightly more time 
la required in filling orders for a few of 
the most popular pattern numbers. 

Send your order to: 



HOME NEEDLEWORK 



530 South WeUs St. 



Chicago. 




Just 2 drops Penetro 
Nose Drops in each 
nostril help you 
breathe freer almost 
instantly, to give your 
head cold air. 25c— 3% 
times as much for 50c 
Caution: Use only as 
directed. Always get 
so »i 



Penetro Nose Drops 



Two-Acre Tree 
A banyan tree in Bali, one of the 
largest in the world, covers two 
acres. 



There is bitter rivalry between I in an honest cause, have a chance 



the "SS" and the army high com- 
mand. It is "touch and "go 1 ' as to 
who will- be there to surrender Ger- 
many to the Allies in the end. 

These are the backbone organiza- 
tions of Hitler's "second army" but 



against the beast, only if they can 
outwit him at his own game. Once 
the active element of evil is con- 
quered, the natural decencies of the 
civilized man rise again and domi- 
nate. 



BRIEFS 



/ 



by Baukhage 



The American Palestine commit- 
tee has launched a nation-wide drive 
to mobilize American public opinion 
in support of the movement to re- 
establish the Jewish national home 

in Palestine. 

• • • 

On December 7, 1941, building of 
a 4-engined bomber required the 
work of 70 men for 1 year; today, 
only 17 workers do the same job. 



Canned orange and grapefruit 

juice is supplied to bombing crews 

and submarine crews. 

• • • 

A total of 195,000 tons of lime, 
enough to make 3,900 heavy car- 
loads, Is used every year in the 
United States in connection with ag- 
ricultural insecticides and fungi- 
cides. 



COUS DEMAND 
IMMEDIATE ATTENTION 

GET PROMPT RELIEF! 



Cold* may lead- to serious Illness, U 
neglected! Rest— SToid exposure. And 
for usual cold miseries, take Grove'a 
Cold Tablets. They're like a doctor's 
prescription—that la, a multiple 
medicine. Contain elghtactive medic- 
inal ingredients— give prompt, deci- 
sive relief from all these cold symp- 
toms. Headache — body aches — fever 
—nasal atufflness. Take exactly as 
directed. Get Grove's Cold Tablets 
from your druggist— for fifty years 
known to millions aa "Bromo Qui- 
nine" Cold Tablet*. a> ' ' 
Save Money— Ccr Larf Economy SUM 



GROVE'S *£ 

COLD TABLETS^ 



Money Could Grow 

Seeds of the cocoa tree were 
once used as money in Mexico. 



££1 RHEUMATIC PAIN 

Willi ■ HiaiolH rati will Pratt IHill 
If you suffer from rheumatic pain 
or muscular aches.buyC-2223 today 
for real pain-relieving help. 60c, $1. 
Caution: Use only as directed. First 
bottle purchase price refunded by 
druggist if not satisfied. GetC-222& 




Give good -tasting tonic 
many doctors recommend 

Valuable Scott's Emulsion helps children 
promote proper growth, strong bones, 
sound teeth I Contains natural A and B 
vitamins— elements all children need. So 
Mother— give Scott's daily the year 
'round Buy at all druggists ! 



■S Tn SCOTT'S 
I EMULSION 

■A Great v 





Thursday, January 13, 1944 




WALTON ADVERTISER 



Released by Western Newipaper Union. 



DASEB ALL'S honor and glory be- 
*-* longed to the pitchers in 1943— 
It 



was their greatest season since 
the first World war days of 1918. 

Official averages for the year 
proved that American league hurl- 
era dominated the competitive pic- 
ture. With dozens of heavy hitters 
In the armed services, the strong 
arm boys had a succession of field 
days. 

Twenty-nine pitchers held oppos- 
lug teams to fewer than three earned 
runs per game, and that hasn't 
happened since 1918 when 33 pitchers 
had that distinction. Last year the 
total was 20 and the year before only 
7 pitchers were included in the list 

Not only was Spurgeon Chandler's 
1.64 the lowest earned-run averagt 




Released by Western Newspaper Union. 

LOW BACK PAIN 




SPUD CHANDLER 

In the American league since Wal- 
ter Johnson's brilliant 1.49 perform- 
ance in 1919, but the Yankee hurler 
also led in the won-and-Iost division, 
posting 20 victories against 4 de- 
feats. 

. Effective Staff 

The staff of the Yankees was by 
far the most effective In the league, 
with Chandler and Ernie Benham 
running one-two among the circuit's 
starting pitchers. The champions 
complied a collective earned-run av- 
erage of 2.93. Bonham averaged 
8.27. 

' Chandler is the thirteenth pitcher 
to lead the league in both depart- 
ments. The only two clubs that beat 
him were Cleveland and Washington 
and each team beat him twice. He 
had a winning streak of 7 games, 
was in 30 games, pitched 252 in- 
nings (a total topped by only 3 
pitchers), pitched to 918 batters, al- 
lowed 197 bits and 62 runs, of which 
46 were earned. He struck out 134 
batters and made 3 wild pitches. 

Detroit placed second to the Yan- 
kees with an average of three 
earned runs per game. Paul ("Dls- 
sy") Trout, Tiger moundsman, was 
the only other 20-game winner of 
the league. He rang up No. 20 on 
the last day of the campaign, losing 
only 12 games for a second division 
team. His earned-run rating was 
2.48. 

The Cleveland Indians' 3.15 gave 
them third place and their stingiest 
pitcher was Vera Kennedy, who al- 
lowed only 2.45 earned runs per 
game while winning 10 and losing 7. 

'Pitcher's Year' 

Although it was a "pitcher's 
year," only two American league 
pitchers, Chandler and Tex Hugh- 
son of Boston, pitched as many as 
. 20 complete games during the sea- 
son. Three other pitchers. Trout, 
Orval Grove of Chicago and Charlie 
Wensloff of New York, worked 18 
complete games. Bonham pitched 
17, Jim Bagby of Cleveland pitched 
16 and Luman Harris of Philadel- 
phia and Emil Leonard of Washing- 
ton each pitched 15. 

Two of the league's "meats" were 
contributed by Cleveland Indians. 
Jim Bagby pitched the most innings, 
273, and Allie Reynolds got the 
most strikeouts, 151. Reynolds' rec- 
ord was especially remarkable in 
that he pitched only 199 Innings, as 
compared with 252 for Chandler, 
who was third In the strikeout de- 
partment. 

Last in the earned-run records of 
pitchers who worked 45 innings or 
more was Al Milnar, former Indian 
who finished the season with the 
St Louis Browns. He gave up 7.33 
earned runs per 9 innings. Bobo 
Newsom allowed 5.87. 

The longest winning streak was 
run up by Orval Grove of the White 
Sox, who won 9 In a row. The 
longest losing streak was that of 
Luman Harris of the A's, who 
dropped 13 straight Harris lost the 
most games for the season, too, be- 
ing beaten 21 times. 



Whenever I see a man with a stiff 
or "poker" back and a drawn ex- 
pression on his face walking "care- 
fully" along the street, I want to 
stop and ask him 
about what caused 
it. I feel this way be- 
cause I had an at- 
tack of low back 
pain due to injury 
and others due to in- 
fected teeth and ton- 
sils. As I have had 
no trouble for many 
years I am natural- 
ly anxious to help 
others get rid of 
their trouble. Being 
a physician, I can- 
not, of course, discuss the matter 
with these patients. 

One of the causes of low back pain 
and sciatica (pain in hip running 
down back of leg) which was un- 
known until recently is rupture or 
crushing of the cushion or disk be- 
tween twoof the bones in the 
Spinal coiamn in the lower back. "" 
In the Canadian Medical Associa- 
tion Journal, Drs. Donald McEach- 
ern and William V. Cone point out 
other symptoms besides the low 
back pain and sciatica. The full pic- 
ture includes (a) onset of back pain 
and sciatica, or both, following 
strain or Injury; (b) the symp- 
toms come and go; (c) symptoms 
grow worse by bending backwards 
and sid e ways and by coughing 
and sneezing and straining; (d) ten- 
derness on stretching or pressure on 
the sciatic nerve situated on the 
buttock and down back of thigh and 
leg; (e) tenderness on deep pres- 
sure on the back to the side of the 
disk or cushion that is crushed or 
ruptured; (f) increased pain, de- 
creased pain, or complete lack of 
pain in the part of the skin over 
the nerve root supplying the part; 
ankle jerk is less than normal or 
absent altogether. 

Drs. McEachern and Cone point 
out that low back pain due to 
a ruptured disk may be severe but 
the patient is unable to describe it 
clearly and that disease of kidney, 
bladder, or abdominal organs may 
be suspected and even operations 
performed. Where the skin over the 
back and the affected side is un- 
usually painful or sensitive to the 
prick or stroke of a pin, and the 
sensation is described as "vibrat- 
ing," "spreading" or painful, it is 
considered due to a ruptured disk 
and not to any kidney or abdominal 
disease. 

• e • 



m 



HOUSEHOLD 



» <ft 



tampers 




STAGE 



Entertain Simply, 
But Do Entertain 
Even in Wartime 




Lynn Chambers' Point-Saving 
Menu 



For Luncheon 

•Tomato Aspic Vegetable Salad 

Finger Sandwiches 

•Coconut Candle Cakes 

Beverage 

•Bccipe Given 



Infants Require 
Some Solid Food 



SPORTS SHORTS 

si Synthetic rubber will replace ba 
lata in the baseball that will be used 
in the big leagues next season. 
ft Red Cochrane, welterweight cham 
pion, is stationed at Pearl Harbor, 
ft Owners of the Baltimore franchise 
in the International league recently 
refused $150,000 cash for a half in- 
terest 

ft Joe McCarthy consumes a pack- 
age and a half of chewing tobacco 
during an ordinary ball game and 
two packages when the going is real- 



A story of former years concerned 
the circus manager and the tame 
lion. At one part of the act an at- 
tendant put his head into the lion's 
mouth. This attendant being sick 
the manager asked another attend- 
ant a new man, to take his place. 
He refused, whereon the manager 
said, "The lion is very tame, he was 
brought up on milk." 

"So was I brought up on miik but 
I eat meat now," was the attend- 
ant's reply. 

Milk has been, and is, the great 
standby of infant and children feed- 
ing; in fact adults are advised to 
drink a pint of milk dally. How- 
ever, milk is not a complete food 
as children grow older, and the 
question arises as to when and how 
solid foods should be added to the 
diets of children. 

Dr. T. G. H Drake, Toronto, in 
the Canadian Medical Association 
Journal, states that in introducing 
solid foods into the diet of infants, 
the regular feeding intervals should 
remain the same. New foods should 
be offered one at a time. The first 
solid food should be a cereal thor- 
oughly cooked and be porridge-like, 
not a gruel, containing minerals and 
vitamins; the cereal should contain 
wheat oats and corn meals, with 
added minerals and vitamins. 
Whole grain brown cereals, while 
higher in minerals and vitamins 
than the white cereals, may be ir- 
ritating to the infant's bowel on ac- 
count of the bran they contain. 

Cereals for infants should be 
cooked for one to four hours in the 
proportion of Vi cup of cereal to 1% 
to 2 cups of water. The water is 
measured into the upper portion of 
the double boiler, a pinch of salt 
added, and the water brought to a 
boil. The cereal is added slowly 
with constant stirring to prevent 
lumping. 

While milk is the most complete 
food known, "milk alone, either hu- 
man or cow's, provides all the food 
necessary only the first month of 
life, after which other foods, must 
be added." 

see 

QUESTION BOX 



One small recipe can provide two 
dozen of these small, fluffy candle 
cakes which will be a delight at any 
get-together for your dessert lunch- 
eon or afternoon refreshment. 
They're particularly nice for a birth- 
day. 

Now that you've finished entertain- 
ing the family and relatives during 
the holidays, you can get back to 
your club work and social activity in 
earnest 

Most of us, from either the budget 
or ration point consideration, can- 
not afford to en- 
tertain for lunch- 
eon as we did for- 
merly, but we 
can still afford 
the same gracious 
TTV'^^SWN hospitality, even 
with less food for 
our guests. Should 
you wish to entertain at luncheon, do 
so with a simple salad, sandwiches 
or beverage. Or, it's very fashion- 
able to entertain at a dessert and 
beverage luncheon. 

A simple cake to go nicely with 
your dessert luncheon or afternoon 
refreshment is this one^o The sur- 
prise item is coconut which now has 
found its way, even though in small 
quantity, to some markets: 




•Tomato Aspic Vegetable Salad. 
(Serves 8) 

1 tablespoon unflavored gelatin 
34 cup cold water 

2 cups tomato juice 
M teaspoon salt 
% teaspoon celery salt 
1 tablespoon grated onion 
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 

1 tablespoon lemon juice 
VA cops grated raw carrot 
% cup diced celery 

2 green onions, sliced 
V*. cup sliced stuffed olives 
Mayonnaise or salad dressing 
Soak gelatin In cold water. Heat 

1 cup tomato juice to boiling. Add 
gelatin and stir 
until dissolved. 
Add celery, salt 
grated onion, Wor- 
cestershire sauge, 
lemon juice and 
remaining tomato 
Juice, i&tir to 
blend. Pour into 
a ring mold. Chill until firm, 
mold. Fill center with carrot, 
ery, green onions and olives which 
have been mixed with salad dress- 
ing. 



By VIRGINIA VALE 

Released by Western Newspaper Union. 

LOOKS as if Warner Bros. 
-* agreed with Jack Benny 
when, on his return from the 
European battlefronts, he de- 
clared the trip was the best 
vacation he'd had in years. 
Humphrey Bogart was-just well on 
his way to entertain servicemen in 
that area when the company an- 
nounced that as soon as he returned 
he'd start work on "To Have and to 



PATTERNS 

SEWING CIRCLE 



Un- 
cel- 




•Coconut Candle Cakes. 
(Makes 2 dosen small) 
IK cups sifted cake flour 
ltt teaspoons double acting baking 

powder 
% cup butter or substitute 

1 cup sugar „. < ' 

2 eggs, unbeaten • 
H cup milk 

1 teaspoon lemon or vanilla extract 
1 cup moist sweetened coconut 

Sift flour once, measure, add bak- 
ing powder and sift together 3 times. 
Cream butter thoroughly, add sugar 
gradually, and cream together until 
light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a 
time, beating well after each addi- 
tion. Add flour, alternately with 
milk, a small amount at a time, 
beating after each addition until 
smooth. Add flavoring. Turn into 
lightly greased cupcake tins filling 
% full. Bake in a moderate (375- 
degree) oven 20 minutes or until 
done. Frost with snowy lemon frost- 
ing and sprinkle with moist sweet- 
ened coconut Arrange cakes on a 
platter and insert candle holder with 
candle on each cake. 

Snowy Lemon Frosting. 

2 egg whites, unbeaten, 
1% cups sugar 

3 tablespoons water 
2 tablespoons lemon juice 
Yt teaspoon grated lemon rind 
Combine egg whites, sugar, water 

and lemon juice in top of double 
boiler, beating with rotary egg beat- 
er until thoroughly mixed. Place 
over rapidly boiling water, beating 
constantly with rotary egg beater 
and cook 7 minutes or until frosting 
stands up in peaks. Remove from 
boiling water, add lemon rind and 
beat until thick enough to spread. 
Makes enough frosting for 2 dozen 
cupcakes. 

Well-seasoned finger sandwiches 
made from flaked fish will go well 
with an aspic salad for a very lovely 
luncheon: 




HUMPHREY BOGART 

Have Not," by Ernest Hemingway. 
It's a tale about the rum-running 
skipper of a yacht operating off the 
Florida Keys— sounds very Bogart- 
lsh. 

* 

That nation-wide search for the 
voice which most nearly approxi- 
mates that of the famous Nellie 
Melba wound up with the selecUon 
of 22-year-old Jean Forward, who'll 
sing In Rene Clair's "It Happened 
Tomorrow." She moved to Los An- 
geles two years ago, and before that 
had sung leading roles, with the 
Golden West Opera company, the 
Southern California Opera company, 
and the American Opera company. 
Her voice was selected from hun- 
dreds by Robert Stoht, who's serving 
as musical director for the produc- 
tion. 

— * — r 





34, 3«, 38, 40 and 42. Size 14 (32) weskK 
requires 1% yards 39-inch material; band- 
bag ft yard. 



Suit Pick-Up. 



(^IVE a Tfright new feeling to 
v - p your suit by adding a splash 
of color in the shape of a neatly 
fitted weskit! Complete the re- 
juvenating treatment with a soft, 
whopping sized handbag to match! 
• • • 

Barbara Bell Pattern No. 1917 Is de- 
signed for sizes 12. 14, 16, 18, 20: 40 and 42. 
Corresponding bust measurements 30, 32, 



WHY TAKE 
HARSH LAXATIVES? 

■ ■ ■■ • 

Simple Fresh Fruit Drink 

Makes Purgatives Unneo 

essary for Most People 



Here s a way to overcome con- 
stipation without harsh laxatives. 
Drink juice of 1 Sunkist Lemon in 
a glass of water first thing on 
arising. 

Most people find this all they 
need — stimulates normal bowel ac- 
tion day after day! 

Lemon and water is good for 
you. Lemons are among the rich- 
est sources of vitamin C, which 
combats fatigue, helps resist colds 
and infections. They supply valu- 
able amounts of vitamins B, and 
„ T hey -B e JMP' appetite. They 
alkahmze, aid digestion. Lemon 
and water has a fresh tang too — 
clears the mouth, wakes you up, 
starts you going. 

Try this grand wake-up drink 
10 mornings. See if it doesn't help 
you! Use California Sunkist 
Lemons. 




Q.— Is there a cure for mucous 
colitis? 

A.— Cure of mucous colitis rests 
with the patient. He or she must 
try to keep relaxed to mind and 
body. 

Q.— Will you please tell me what 
causes an overabundance of electric- 
ity in the body? 

' A.— Everybody seems to have 
some electricity; you appear to have 
more than the average. Nothing 
to be done about It 



Lynn Says 



Bits of Wisdom: Gentle treat- 
ment Is the rule for eggs. They 
are liable to get tricky if you use, 
anything else. 

Pare, not peel potatoes. You'll 
be able to see the difference. 
When boiling potatoes, be sure to 
use boiling water, plenty of salt 

For mashed potatoes, use en- 
thusiasm plus a wooden spoon and 
don't spare either. 

Waffles should be crisp. Don't 
open the waffle baker while the 
Iron is steaming. That means 
it's cooking. 

Recipes are a chart and a 
guide. Good cooks as well as 
brides need them— then you can 
always get good results, avoid 
failure. 

Save Used Fats! 



This satisfying main course Is pre- 
pared by melting % pound of proc- 
ess cheese with H cup evaporated 
milk, seasoning with Worcestershire 
sauce and % teaspoon prepared 
mustard, then serving on toast with 
poached egg. It's delicious. 

Dieting friends will welcome this 
combination custard and cake des- 
sert because it 
doesn't contain as 
many calories as 
rich desserts. It's 
delicate and ideal 
when served with 
tea for afternoon 
refreshment 
Lemon Cups. 
(Serves 6) 

1 cup sugar 

2 tablespoons butter or substitute 

3 egg yolks, beaten 
Vi. cup flour 
% teaspoon salt 
1% cups milk, scalded 
5 tablespoons lemon juice 
1 tablespoon grated lemon rind 
3 egg whites, stiffly beaten 
Cream together sugar and butter. 

Add egg yolks. Beat in flour and 
salt. Add milk. Stir in lemon juice 
and rind. Fold in egg whites. Pour 
into custard cups. Bake at 375 de- 
grees for 10 minutes, then reduce 
heat to 350 degrees. Bake for 35 
minutes longer or until a toothpick 
thrust into the center comes out dry. 
ChilL Serve directly from custard 
cups. 

Your guests, young or old, will 
like these attractive - corsages. 
They're very much edible and good, 
too! 

^Popcorn Corsages. 
(Hakes 16) 
1 cup sugar 
H cup water 

1 teaspoon vinegar 

2 tablespoons Ught corn syrup 
% teaspoon salt 
1 tablespoon butter 

I, 1 teaspoon red food coloring 

6 cups popped corn 

Combine sugar, water, vinegar, 
corn syrup and salt; stir until sugar 
dissolves. Cook to bard ball stage 
(265 degrees F.). Remove from 
heat; add butter and coloring. Re- 
serve small amount of syrup for 
fastening wooden skewers. Pour 
over popped corn, stirring constant- 
ly. Form into two-inch balls. Dip 
skewers into syrup; push into balls. 
Back with lace-paper doilies and 
cellophane circles. Tie on bows of 
ribbon or cellophane. 



When Janet Wilde was in Holly- 
wood she appeared in a mere hand- 
ful of pictures, mostly Westerns. 
She switched to radio, and was cho- 
sen to portray Corliss Archer in the 
new comedy series— and now the 
film folk want her back. "That's not 
for me," says Janet 

— * — 

Tom Coats Is a stunt double whose 
services are hired for extraordinary 
feats of horsemanship. He worked 
in "Riding High," and one chore 
was to impersonate Cass Daley 
driving a heavy wagon at full tilt 
over a desert road. He had to wear 
a wig with a pompadour, so that in 
long shots he'd look like Cass— and 
that wig-above his rugged face prac- 
tically ruined the members of the 
crew! 

— * — 




HOUSEHOLD 
MlhTSl 




• His outstanding work in films and 
in radio guest appearances has won 
William Bendix a starring air show 
of his own, the Blue Network's Sun- 
day afternoon comedy-drama "The 
Life of Riley." It was those guest 
appearances that attracted the ra 
dio moguls' Interest. 
— * — 
To present a broad, Inclusive pic- 
ture of American youth In wartime 
and to show how youth itself is meet- 
ing the challenge of increased ju- 
venile delinquency, the NaUonal 
Broadcasting company has an- 
nounced a 13-week series of pro- 
grams, "Here's to Youth," which 
will be heard Saturdays from one 
to one-thirty, Eastern War Time, 
beginning January 15. The broad 
casts will be presented in coopera- 
tion with 10 major voluntary youth 
organisations with a total youth 
membership of 31 million. 

* 



To keep the clothes prop in place 
when used on a wire line, place a 
clothespin on each side of the 
prop. 

• • -• 
Insulating board, cut to proper 

shape and size, makes a neat and 
serviceable table pad. For larger 
tables, it can be made in sections. 

• • • 

More juice can be obtained from 
ttftnons if they are warmed before 
squeezing. A good way is to let 
the fruit stand in warm water for 
a few minutes. 

• • • 

When making a ebocolate pie, 

try using half left-over coffee and 
half milk and see how much it im- 
proves the flavor. 

• • • 

Empty butter cartons are handy 
for storing cookie dough in the re- 
frigerator. The dough is then eas- 
ily sliced into uniform pieces for 
molding. 

• • • 

When sewing, a medicine dropper 
filled with water and run along a 
seam which is to be pressed, is 
the simplest method of dampen- 
ing the material. 

• '• • 

If the ticking of a clock annoys 
an invalid, yet she insists on know- 
ing the time frequently, place a 
glass, bowl over the offending 
clock. It can then be seen but 
not heard. 



NOSE MUST DRAIN 

To g*limv9 H*ad Cold Minries 
When head colds strike, help nose ' 
drain.clearthewayforfreerbreathing ' 
comfort with lONDON'S IUSAL JELLY. At druuistm 




Narrow House 

One of the oddities of New York 
city is its narrowest house, at 75% 
Bedford street, Manhattan. It was 
built in a driveway between two 
buildings and is only 9Vi feet wida 
from front to back. . 



FALSE TEETH 



HELD FIRMLY BY 



NOW WEAR YOUR PLATES tVEKY DAT 
-ftflD COMFOfi T ABl Y SMUG THIS WAT 
It's so easy to wear your plates regu- 
larly—all day— when held firmly in 
Slace by this "comfort-cushion"—* 
entist's formula. 



I.Dr.Warnet'sPow- 
dsr lets you enjoy 
•olid foods— avoid 
embarrassment of 
loose plates. Helps 
prevent sore gums. 
2. Largest selling 



plate powder. 

a Economical; 

small amount lasts 

longer. 

♦.Dr.Wernet'spow- 

der is pure, harmless 

— pleasant tasting. 



All drvoofsf, -30*. Memy bock if m>l iTjUiiI 



LARGFST SELLING PtfllL 
PDVVDLR IN THt WORI D 




TABASCO 

The snapplea t seasoning known, and 
the world'a moet widely distributed 
food product! A dash of this piquant 
sauce giTM • rare flavor to any food. 
TABASCO — the seasoning secret of 
master chafe for more than 75 years I 



At 66, Charles Coburn, veteran of 
stage and screen, not only sings for 
the first time in films but also en- 
gages in his first screen romance. 
The girl is blonde Constance Dowl- 
ing, who, with Coburn and Nelson 
Eddy, Is co-starred in "Knickerbock- 
er Holiday." As Governor Petet 
Stuyvesant, Coburn not only wears s 
peg leg, but does a dance as well. 



-*- 



TOO BAD 

We can't make enough Smith Bra*. Cough 
Drops to satisfy everybody, because our out- 
put is war-reduced-jo please buy only as 
many as yon really need. Through three gen- 
erations and five wars, Smith Bros. Cough 
Drops have given soothing relief from 
coughs due to colds. Still only 5f. 

SMITH BROS. COUGH DROPS 

■LACK OK MENTHOl— 5* 





Shoulder a Gun qr the Cost of One 
* Buy United States War Bonds 



// you want sugar-saving suggestions, 
writ* to Lynn Chambers, Western News- 
paper Union, 210 South Desplaines 
Street, Chicago 6, Illinois. Don't for- 
get to enclose a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope for your reply. 
Released by Western Newspaper Union. . 



Ella Raines was considered toe 
typically AmericaT»-to play the Eng 
lish girl in "The Uninvited"— Gai] 
Russell got the role. Ella wai 
thought too sophisticated for "Oui 
Hearts Were Young and Gay"— Gai] 
got the part. But— Ella's set as lead- 
ing woman in "Kail the Conquering 
Hero," in which she'll play oppo- 
site Eddie Bracken— and it's a Pres 
ton St urges picture! 

* 

ODDS AND ENDS— With that lucky 
alarm clock back on the Vox Pot 
show. Parks Johnson and Warren Hull 
•re wondering again what will happen 
if it ever goes off during the commer 
rial— would the sponsor get the $10, of 
would it go to the announcer, they ash 
. . . Clifford Goldsmith, author of "Tin 
Aldrich Family," has been asked to re- 
peat tome of his especially populas 
scripts — on innovation in radio if ht 
does it . . . Renee Terry of CBS 
"Bright Horizon" has been awarded 
service stripes as a nurse's aide . . . 
There's, been an avalanche of suggee 
turns that Fred Allen and Lauritu Afel 
ekier sis their stunt in pictures. 



i«&* 



tot 



V\e^ 






torfceonotw 



Won. 



GIRl 



CLABBER 

9 s ** wMfna 
BEST OF EVERYTHING for 



BAKING* 



CLABBER GIRL 



SEWING CIRCLE, PATTERN DEPT. 

530 South Wells St. Chicago 

Enclose 20 cents In coins for each 
pattern desired. 
Pattern No .Size.. 















■H ■'. ■ 



n 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1944 



INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

W. E. Maners, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 7:00 o. m. 

Evangelist Services 8:00 p. m. 
Prayer and Bible Study, 
Wednesday 8:00 p. m 



NOTICE 



Bids will be received until 7 
O'clock on January 14th, 1944, to 
plaster the office at the City Hall. 

The Board reserves the right to 
accept or reject any or all bids 
submitted. / 

D. H.'Vest, Clerk. 



TARPAULINS 

After Selling Your Tobacco, Stop and See Our 

Line of Tarpaulins 

All Sizes — Prices Reasonable 

— WE ALSO DO REPAIR WORK — 

COVINGTON AWNING & ROOFING CO. 

% Square South of Kenton Loose Leaf Warehouse 

301 Scott St. COVINGTON Hlland 173S 




NO PRIORITIES 

ARE NEEDED FOR FARM TOOLS WELDED 

R. Michels Welding 
Company 

722 Wellingto n St C ovington Colonial 0670 



DEAD STOCK REMOVED FREE 

For Prompt Removal of Horses and Cows 

CALL VALLEY 0867 

WE PAY "PHONE CHARGES 

Ky. Dead Animal Disposal Co. 



LOCKLAND 



WTO 

Walton Perpetual Bldg. & Loan Assn. 

DIXIE STATE BANK BLDG. WALTON, KY. 

E. S. West, Sec"! A. M. Edwards, Pre*. 

SEMI-ANNUAL DIVIDENDS 




NEW CROP 



*3 



DIXIE BRAND 

SEEDS 



SOLD ONLY AT HILL'S 



High in germination and purity . . . best 
all-round results assured. We advise 
you to buy them at your earliest con- 
venience . . . begin now to make 1944 the 
biggest year you ever had . . . it's up to 
you! 



Same High Quality Since 1863 



CEORCE W. 



Since 18SS 

ILL 

AMD — — 

COMPANY 



SEEDSMEN SINCE 1863 



24-28 W. 
SEVENTH ST. 



25-29 PIKE 
STREET 



COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



I SINCE 1863 



Attend the Public Sale Friday, 
January 14th at one o'clock, to be 
held at the V. P. Kerns farm, one 
mile south of Walton. See his ad 
on another page of this paper. 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



RADIO REPAIRS at reasonable 
rates. Colonial 1121. 509 Scott 
Street. tf-lt 



NOTICE — Pure Drinking Water 
Hauled anywhere — anytime 
Call Walton 423. Jas. E. Falls. 
tf-47 



WANTED — Housekeeper, white or 
colored to stay at the home. 
Childrens care, no laundry. 
$8.00 a week. Mrs. Edith Hancy, 
Stephenson Mill Road, Walton, 
Ky. lt-7» 




Your Valentine Photo 

Keep your image close to him 
in the lonely hours on a far- 
away front— Send your smiling 
Valentine Photograph, made in 
our modern studio. Come In 
today. 

SERVICE PHOTO 
STUDIO 

804 Madison Ave., Covington 

STUDIO HOURS: 

11 A. M. to 9 P. M. Daily 

Sundays, 1 to 5 P. M. 



WANTED — Girl or middle aged 
women for light house work and 
child care — working mother. 
Same as own home, no laundry, 
little cooking, good home and 
wages. Write Box 27, Care The 
Walton Advertiser. lt-8 



FOR SALE— 23 head of sheep — 
or will trade for cows. Marion 
(Dutch) Elliott, Fiskburg, Ky., 
3 L Highway. 2t-8* 



FOR SALE— 200 bales Alfalfa 
and 80 bales Red Clover. Dr. J. 
F. McCormac, Verona, Ky. lt-8* 



FOR SALE— 1 fresh Jersey cow, 
with calf 3 weeks old and 5 O. 
I. C. Shoats, 2 sows and 3 boars, 
5 months old. A. C. Marsh, top 
of Houston Hill, Verona, Ky., 
Route 1. lt-8* 



WANTED— Tenant with team and 
tools to crop on shares-20 acres 
of corn, tobacco and other farm 
products. 5-room house and 
plenty of pasture furnished, 
Apply 18 Chambers Ave., Wal- 
ton or 2029 Scott St., Covington, 
Ky. 2t-8* 



FARMS FOR SALE 



AT FIRST 
»0N Of A 



c 



ov» 



use 666 

•66 TABLETS. SAIYL HOSE M0P5 



W. E. TAIT, 0.1 

OPTOMETRIST 

Specializing in the 

correction and 

protection of 

EYESIGHT 




27 E. 7th St 

COVINGTON, KY. 



10 ACRES — 5 miles out; 3-room 
house; near bus line; nice fruit 
and shade trees $1600 

7 ACRES — Bus line; 5-roo m h ouse 
electric, basement, furnace; 2 
chicken houses, barn $3800 

44 ACRES — 3-room house, electric, 
large barn, good outbuildings, 
fenced; good road $3500 

80 ACRES — Good road; 5-room 
house, large barn, 2-foom 
tenant house .". $5500 

80 ACRES — Near Nicholson; dairy 
farm; 6-room house and two 
barns $8750 

110 ACRES— Off Taylor Mill; 6- 
room house, large barn; rich, 
rolling land $8500 

56 ACRES — Near Independence; 
5-room house, electric, 2 barns, 
dairy and tobacco $6500 

59 ACRES — 6-room house and 
barn $6800 

68 ACRES— 8-room house, large 
dairy barn, electric; a real home 
and farm $10,500 

77 ACRES— Near Independence; 
8-room colonial brick home, 3 
barns, dairy, stock and tobacco; 
lot of good outbuildings $13,000 

200 ACRES— Just off Dixie High- 
way; modern home, 3 barns, 
dairy, stock an dtobacco — PER 
ACRE .-. $100 

150 ACRES — Near Dixie; 6-room 
house, electric, dairy barn; rich 

level land; fence. Per Acre $100 

59 ACRES — Near Union; 5-room 
house, electric; large barn; 
vacant; Federal loan. Price 
$5750. 

61 ACRES — Near Union; 4-room 
cottage, electric ;good barn and 
outbuildings; tenant house. 

110 ACRES — Near Florence; 8- 
room modern brick; large dairy 
barnf a real home and 
farm $12,500 

REL C. WAYMAN 

Covington, Ky. 

623 Washington Street 

HE. 5107 Independence 5064 



FOR SALE— 131 acres, Falmouth - 
Williamstown State Road or R. 
22, excellent 2 story 7-room 
frame house, electric, beautiful 
grounds, large fish resorvoir, 
just built, small fish pond in 
concrete, all kinds of flowers 
and shrubs, barns, large wood- 
land, oak ready for saw, creek, 
branches, springs, several cis- 
terns, well, milk route, tele- 
phone. Price $6,800.00. Liberal 
Terms. Forest S. Thompson, 
Proprietor of The Mutual 
Realty Co., Williamstown, Ky.- 
Falmouth. Phone 2817. It8 



FOR SALE— 3 fresh cows with 
calves by side, also one work 
horse. George Menke, Walton, 
Ky. 2t-8* 



FARM HELP WANTED— Three 
tenants, tobacco base of 12 
acres, raise tobacco and work by 
day only — Seperate home for 
each. Vess Gaines and Sons, 
Burlington, Ky., Phone 251. 
2t-8* 



WANTED TO BUY— Used fur- 
niture, good and bad; atniques; 
coins; old glassware; old pic- 
tures; books and buttons. John 
Stubblefield. Walton* Ky., R. 2. 
Phone 495. 6t-45* 



MAYTAG WASHER— Parts and 
repairing. Wm. Hagedorn, 856 
Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Ky. 
tf-49 



T 



In Memory of 


•>> 


C. SCOTT CHAMBERS 


• - 


Jan. 12, 1943 


! 



CHAMBERS * GRUBBS 



Funeral Directors 



Phone Walton 352 



I 



20 YEARS in radio servicing. W. 
M. STEPHENSON, Radio spec- 
ialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Coving- 
ton. Colonial 1121. tf-10 



FOR SALE— Large Circulating, 
Parlor Type Coal Heater. James 
Allen, So. Walton. Ph. 154. 4t5 



WANTED— Stock sheep, most any 
kind. J. W. Eckler, Williams- 
town, Ky., Ph. 4084. 4t-5* 



W A N T E D— A capable house- 
keeper, , must like children. 
Address reply to Walton Adver- 
tiser, Dept. W., Walton, Ky. tf5 



TENANT WANTED— For 4 acres 
tobacco, 5 or 6 acres corn. Team, 
all tools and house furnished. 
Call Saturday evening or Sun- 
day morning. T. T. Thomas, 
Walton, Ky., R. 2, Phone Wal- 
ton 59 IX. 2t-7* 



FOR SALE— Two Jersey cows, six 
and seven years old. One re- 
gistered; Ayshire Bull, eighteen, 
months old and one-horse corn 
drill. Robert M. Hoffman, Green 
Road, Walton, Ky. 2t-8* 



FOR SALE— Walnut hat-rack 
with narrow; used 9x12 axmin- 
ister rug; folding-bed, maho- 
gany finish, in splendid condit- 
ion. Mrs. R. E. Ryle, Walton, 
Ky., Phone 26. 2t-8» 



I 



JANUARY FURNITURE CLEARANCE 

New 2 Pc. Living Room Suites $69.75 

Reg. $79.75 Value — Buy now and save $10.00 

Store wide reductions ranging from 10% to 50% 

The Dine-Schabell Furniture Co. 



521 Madison Ave., 



Covington, Ky. 



I 



LOST— A ring of keys, between 
Walton and Dry Ridge. Finder 
please leave keys at Advertiser 
Office. 



FOR RENT— One of the best 
tobacco farms in Carroll Co. 
with interest in sheep, beef, and 
dairy cattle.. Come in and talk It 
over. Mrs. S. G. Tilton, Gent, 
Ky 4t-7* 



WE ARE NOW TAKING ORDERS FOR 

BABY CHICKS 

We Sell Dr. Salsbury's Poultry Remedies, Poultry 
Feeders, Water Founts, Etc. 

FUL-O-PEP FEED STORE 



512 PIKE STREET 

COVINGTON, 

KY. 



| N.lion.Kid, PO'IITBY 
HIAilK »t RVICE 1 



HEMLOCK 9168 

Open Sundays Till 

Noon 




From where I sit . . . 

/>y Joe Marsh 



Never laughed so hard in my 
lift* as when Ben Ryder's white- 
faced steers broke through the 
fence out on the pike, with Ben 
—dodging this way and that—' 
trying to get 'em back on the 
pasture all by himself. 

Ed Carey, Lem Martin and I 
were headed for town in Ed's car. 

"Hold on there!" I yelled to 
Ben. '"There's three good men 
here to give you a hand!" 

Well air, by a little coaxing 
and cooperation, we got those 
steers back in the field all right, 

and the fence fixed, in short order. 



Ben was mighty grateful to na 
And it just goes to show how 
cooperation does it, every time. 

The brewers here in Kentucky 
have proved cooperation works. 
As an industry, they make it a 
point to see that beer is sold the 
way folks want it, in decent, 
law-abiding surroundings. 

From where I sit, they're do- 
ing a good job. They're mighty 
jealous of beer's reputation as a 
beverage of moderation. 



$*%»*£ 



•.lSOsnisaM 



FOR SALE— Six room house, in 
good condition, with electric 
and water in the house, good 
garden space. Located on High 
School Court. Raymond Gross, 
Phone Florence 8503 W. 2t-7 



FOR SALE— 150 barrel corn. C. B. 
Norman, 26 South Main St., 
Walton, Ky. 3t-7* 



WOOD SHEET METAL HEATING STOVES 

Coal Heaters, Oakes and Warm Morning 
Stove Pipe and Elbows 



39 Inches High, 12-Inch Stay Field 
4-Point Cattle Barb Wire 



Fence 



John Deere Farm Machinery and DeLaval 
Milkers and Cream Separators. 

The Jansen Hdw. Co. 



108-110 Pike Street 



Co. 0910 



Covington, Ky . 



AUCTION 

Modern 7-Room Bungalow and The Hut Tavern' 
SATURDAY, JANUARY %% 

2 p. m. 

C ARROLLTON, KENTUCKY 

On U. S. 42 Near The Junction o^Iighway 227 One Mile 
To Butler's State Park ' 

The home is on a large lot 55x420 ft., has seven airy weU-arranged- 
rooms, Glassed-in back porch, City water, Bath Furnace, Automatic 
Stoker and Large Electric Water Heater. All in excellent condition. 
1 Three-room cottage, wih electricity and city water. Large trailer lot, 
lighted, with shelter house, 3 out-door furnaces and city water. 

This It A Lovely Home, and The Grounds Could Easily Be 
Developed Into A Paying Business. 

"The Hut" is a road side tavern, built of brick, concrete and stucco, on 
a large lot. With basement, furnace and hot water. Has boothes and 
tables for 30 people. Is now doing a splendid business, and has been 
for several years. Will be sold subject to present lease which expires 
June 1944. Carrollton is the ONLY town of importance between 
Louisville and Cincinati. These properties «*e*"near the "Blue Gables" 
one of the outstanding tourist places in Ky. Will be offered seperately 
* and as a whole. Mr. T. O. Lacy, the owner, has other business that 
requires his entire time. He has contracted for an "ABSOLUTE 
SALE" The only kind we conduct. 

LIBERAL TERMS:— ONE-THIRD CASH, BALANCE ON TIME 

Inspect this unusual property the best location in Carrollton 



AUSTIN L MOORE & CO. 



If You Have Property To Sell — "See Us' 



Shelby ville, Ky. 




.-< ,- 1 . matt 




tW 



■w 



onlveisary oi Ky. Llbm* 
LEXINGTON KY 



UK 



WALTON ADVERTISER 

— NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER — 
Devoted To the Interest of Boone, Kenton, Gallatin and Grant Countiee—Kenton-CampbeU Courier Consolidated With the Advertiser 



Subscription $1.50 Per Year In Advance 



Homemakers 
Advisory Council 
Meeting Held 



The advisory council of Boone 
County Homemaker Clubs met in 
Burlington, Tuesday, January 11. 
County President, Mrs. Leo Plynn 
called the meeting to order, and 
gave an interesting review on the 
origin of our club collect, and a 
short sketch of its author. Mrs. 
Flynn advised all Homemaker 
Clubs to use it and the pledge to 
the Flag in their regular meetings. 
Minutes of last year's meeting 
were read and approved. Trea- 
surer's report given and accepted. 
County chairmen responded to 
roll call with good reports on 
accomplished work, and excellent 
ideas for further advancement in 
club work. 

Mrs. Alan Gaines- was asked to 
introduce a gentleman represen- 
tative of the War Production 
Board. He discussed the urgent 
need of paper by our government, 
and was here to interest Boone 
County folk in the waste paper 
drive being staged in our two 
neighboring counties. Mrs. Alan 
Gaines was named county chair- 
men for the drive in our county. 
Mrs. Gaines asked each local club 
president and citizenship chair- 
man to serve on paper salvage 
committees. 

Miss Lulia Logan, Assistant 
state leader of Home Demonstrat- 
ion Agents discussed the State 
Farm and Home meeting at Lex- 
ington on January 25-28 inc. Two 
county delegates were appointed, 
and Miss Logan hoped each club 
would send a delegate. 

Miss Mary Hood Gillaspie dis- 
cussed some important amend- 
ments to the Federation Con- 
stitution to be dealth with at the 
State Meeting. 



WALTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, January, 20th. 1944 




VOLUME SO— NUMBER 9 



Wilber E. Harris Promoted 
To Petty Officer Third Class. 



Wilber E. Harris Sp. (1) 3-c, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Harris 
of Verona was home on a 48 hour 
leave this past week. Wilber has 
just finished his "boot" training 
at Great Lakes and has been 
transferred to Washington D. C. 
where he has been promoted to 
Petty Officer 3-c Specilist (1) His 
work is in the Communication 
Dept. of the Navy. 

He expects to be stationed In 
Washington about three months, 
then is subject to be sent some- 
where in the South Pacific. 



Verona Homemakers Club 



The Verona Homemakers Club 
met Friday, January 7th at the 
home of Mrs. Clara Vest, Fourteen 
members were present and all en- 
joyed a bountiful lunch at the 
noon hour. The afternoon session 
was given to the transaction of 
business and contained work on 
the afghan. 

. The next meeting will be with 
Mrs. J. T. Roberts, February 4th 
at 10:30 A. M. Roll Call, "My 
Greatest Household Pests". Pro- 
ject: Study of household pest. 
Leader, Mrs. Hannah Chapman. 



Real Estate Sales. 



NOTICE— 



The 1st Quarterly Associational 
Meeting of the North Ben Ass'n. 
will meet at Latohia on Thursday, 
January 27ht. All ladies are urged 
to attend. 



OCCUPATIONAL TAX 



All occupational tax for the 
year 1944 is now due and pay- 
able at the City Hall: . 
R. E. BRUGH, 

Tax Collector. 



Forest S. Thompson, Proprietor 
of The Mutual Realty Compay, 
Williamstown, Ky., reports the 
following sales for last week: 

Herman Kenney and Hallie 
Kenney's farm of 96 acres located 
near Mt. Zion, Grant County to 
Herbert H. Spegal and Laverne 
Spegal of Falmouth, Ky., Pendle- 
ton County. 

Mr. and Mrs. Spegal are to be 
congratulated on securing this 
fine locust and limestone soil farm 
with one of the most modern 
homes in Grant County in either 
town or country. This farm <s*is 
highly improved \n every way, and 
has one of the finest tobacco crops 
of any in the burley belt. 

Mr. and Mrs. Spegal plan to 
move to their new purchase by 
March the first. 

The purchase price was $9,000. 

The Mutual has sold the J. R. 
Kenner farm belonging to J. R. 
and Verda Kenner, located on 
Morgan Road near Route 22, 
Pendleton County to Frank Kla- 
ber and Eva Klaber of the same 
vicinity. 

This farm has a 4-room dwell- 
ing with two good barns and other 
improvements, and 118 acres of 
productive land. 

Mr. and Mrs. Klaber plan to 
move to their new purchase by 
March the first. 

The purchase price was $4,600. 



Victory Waste 
Paper Campaign 
Now In Progress 



We want your community and 
every community in Boone County 
to help in holding the line on the 
paper shortage. We can make up 
the shortage in paper by salvag- 
ing it on the Home Front. 

All newspapers should be tied in 
bunches about twelve inches thick, 
all magazines should be tied in 
bundles, old books and record 
books should be treated in the 
same way, all brown corrugated 
cartons should be torn apart and 
flattened. We want all wrapping 
paper; all bags from very small 
ones to the large size used for 
cement, lime and fertilizer, shoe 
boxes, old postors, cataloges and 
etc. Waste basket paper and en- 
velopes are the best grade. made. 
Leave the paper sheets flat and 
stuff this lightly in cartons. 

It is the hope of the War Pro- 
duction Board that all schools will 
accept a quota of five pounds per 
pupil each peek. The schools will 
receive the money from the sale 
of the paper. 

Payment for all paper collected 
before the fifteenth of February is 
guaranteed by the War Product- 
ion Board. 

Collection mechanics and dates 
for collection have been set up in 
many localities. 

You may call the following local 
chairmen for further information: 
Burlington, Mrs. H. R. Forkner; 
Hebron, Mrs. Sue Rogers; Bullitts- 
ville, Mrs. Albert Willis; Con- 
stance, Mrs. Henry Kottmeyer; 
Florence, Mrs. Harold Conner; 
New Haven, Mrs. Jake Cleek; 
Petersburg, Miss Gladys Klopp; 
Rabbit Hash, Mrs. Orville Kelly; 
Taylorsport, Mrs. Wm. Sprague; 
Verona, Mrs. Gilbert Stewart; 
Walton, Mrs. Harry Mann; Wal- 
ton (colored), Mis. Alice Sleet. 

Collection dates for waste paper 
are: Petersburg, Thursday, Jan. 
20th; Hebron, Friday, Jan. 21st; 
Walton, Saturday, Jan. 22nd; 
Verona, Monday, Jan. 24th. The 
Verona school bus is collecting 
paper every day on its route to 
school and expects to have all the 



No Ration Stamp Necessary On 
Certain Types Of Ladies Shoes. 



Our lady readers will be in- 
terested in the announcement 
that, effective now and lasting 
through February 5, OPA (Office 
of Price Administration) has 
ruled that shoe merchants ' of 
Kenton and Boone Counties may 
sell certain types of women's 
shoes without requiring the 
usual ration coupons. 

We suggest ladles look through 
this paper for such special offer- 
ings. 



Y. W. A's. Hold Meeting 



The regular monthly meeting of 
the Y. W. A's. of the Walton 
Baptist Church was held at the 
home of Mrs. Bess Conrad on 
Tuesday night, January 11th with 
Mrs. Byran Rector as leader. 

Those present were: Miss Lucy 
Pennington, Miss Grace Hanks, 
Miri Betty Joe Parker, Miss Mary 
Frances Surface, Miss Goldie 
Hurston, Miss Bessie Jean Ford, 
Miss Ruth Mann, Miss Mary 
Louise McCubbin, Miss Bonnie 
Linkens, Miss Joe Ann Farris, Mrs. 
Julia Pennington and Mrs. E. B. 
Powers. 



Delegates Selected 
To Attend Farm 
And Home Week 



Bearcats Defeat 
Florence 50-35 



The Walton-Verona Bearcats 
defeated the Florence Nights by 
a score of 50 to 35 on the losers 
floor Friday night. 

Pennington and Taylor were 
high point men for the Bearcats 
with 19 and 10. Shields was high 
for the Nights with 23 points. 

In the second team game the 
Cubs in a closer contest defeated 
the Florence second team by a 
score of 20 to 17. Roberts and 
Winn were high point men for 
the Cubs with 8 each. 

The Bearcats play Burlington 
at the Burlington School Friday 
night. 

Coach Dearing says that both 
teams are coming through with 
ability that exceeds the expectat- 
ions of the folk of the community 



game. 



and that there is a fine spirit of 
paper at the school by Mondayv Sportsmanship displayed in each 
Jan. 24th. Rabbit Hash will an- 
nounce their date next week. 

This set-up is sponsored by the 
Homemakers Clubs of the County 
of which Mj-s. Allen Gaines of 
Walton is Chairmen. 



Quarterly Meeting 



Endowment Fund 

For Methodist Colleges. 




YOU MUST SEE! 

Not you, alone ... but the nation 
may depend on your unerring 
SIGHT, for security. Rely on us 
to fit you with glasses that will 
aid you for every work or defense 
duty you may face. 



DR. J. O. TYSON 

Optometrist 
OFFICES WITH 

MOTCH 

Optician — Jewelers 
613 MADISON AVE. COVINGTON, KIT. 

Established 1857 



The Methodist Churches in the 
Kentucky and Louisville Confer- 
enc es are un dertaking to raise an 
Endowment Repair Fund of six 
hundred thousand dollars for the 
three Methodist Church Colleges 
in Kentucky. These Colleges are: 
"Kentucky Wesleyan" at Win- 
chester, "Union College" at Bar- 
bourville • and "Linsey Wilson" at 
Columbia, Ky. 

Rev. Dearing, pastor of the 
Walton Methodist Church states 
that his membership has already 
contributed nearly five hundred 
dollars since he presented the 
cause. The drive will close for the 
Walton Church next Sunday 
night. He requests that all pledges 
and checks be in by that time. 



Applications For 
New 1944 Tobacco 
Allotments 



Mrs. W. N. Carnes, Supt. of the 
Woman's Missionary Union of the 
North Bend Association,' an- 
nounces the first quarterly meet- 
ing will be held Thursday, Jan. 
27th at 10:30 a. m. instead of Jan. 
20th as stated earlier. 

The Rev, John Meuv returned 
Missionary to Brazil will be guest 
speaker. 

The meeting will be held at the 
Latonia Baptist Church. 



The Boone County Homemakers 
Advisory Council selected Mrs. 
Albert Willis and Mrs. Albert 
Pfalzraf, as voting delegates to 
meetings of the Kentucky Feder- 
ation of Homemakers held during 
Farm and Home Week. 

Several local homemakers clubs 
are planning to send representat- 
ives to the program January 25th 
through January 28th held at 
Memorial Hall on the campus of 
University of Kentucky, Lexing- 
ton. Others are planning to attend 
one or two days program. Any one 
from Boone Cunty attending is 
asked to register in the lobby of 
Memorial Hall, so the University 
may have a complete record of 
attendance. 

The convention will start at 
9:30 A. M. Tuesday, January 25th. 
Speakers for Tuesday include Dr. 
H. L, Donovan, Pres. Univ. of Ky , 
Miss Florence Hall, Chief, 
Women's Land Army Division, Mr. 
Roy Hendrickson, Director, Food 
Distribution Administration, 
Washington and Dr. Faith 
Williams, U. S. Dept. Of Labor 
Highlights of Wednesday's pro- 
gram includes talks- by people 
familiar with habits of other 
countries, among the speakers are 
Mr. A. H. Tandy, British Consul, 
Cincinnati; Miss Else Roed, Royal 
Norwegian Information Service, 
Mrs. Chu Shih-Mang and Miss 
Flora Dodson returned missionary. 
Dean Thomas Cooper will be the 
first speaker for Thursday. Other 
talks will be made by Miss Ger- 
trude Dieken, Home Economics 
Consultant, DuPont Company; 
and Rev. A. W. Fortune, Lexing- 
ton. The Annual Business meeting 
of Kentucky Federation of Home- 
makers will be held on Firday 
with the annual luncheon held in 
the Bail room of Phoenix Hotel. 

Anyone desiring information on 
the progiam o* tiansportation to 
Farm & Home Week are urged to 
contact Miss Mary Hood Gillaspie, 
Home Demonstration Agent. 



Richard L. Jones Promoted To 
Rank of Sergeant In U. S. 
Marine Corps. 



Londonderry < delayed ) — Marine 

Sergeant Richapfl L. Jones, son 
of Mr. and Mrs; Melvin Jones, 
Verona, Kentucky, has been pro- 
moted to that rank form Corporal. 

He attended Simon Kenton 
High School at Independence, Ky. 
graduating in the class of 1938, 
and then attended the Covington 
Commercial College in Covington, 
Kentucky, before entering the 
employ of F. W. Woolworth in 
Covington. 

He left a position there as as- 
sistant manager to join the 
Marines in January, 1942. He was 
on guard duty for a short time 
after coming to this base. 

Sergeant Jones has two brothers 
in the service, Raymond W. and 
Carl, both in the Marine Corps. 



Boone County 4-H Leaders 
To Hold Training Meeting. 



Boone County 4-H club leaders 
will hold a special training and 
planning meeting at Burlington 
on Saturday, January 22nd at 
10:00 A. M. according to H. R. 
Forkner, County Agent. . 

Plans for the 1944 Activity pro- 
gram will be made at the meeting. 
E. E. Fish and Edith Lacy, 4-H 
Club specialists from the College 
of Agriculture will lead the dis- 
cussions with the adult leaders 
attending. Each community club 
is urged to be represented. 



Walton Woman's Literary 
Club Entertained. 



Lt. W. A. Powers and wife of 
Dayton, Ohio visited his grand- 
mother, Mrs. W. R. Powers Sun- 
day. 



Local Division of W. S. C. S. 



Rivard — Mehne 



Edwin Kenneth Rivard, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Rivard of 
Independence and Miss Alda 
Mehne, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Harold Mehne of Erlanger were 
united in marriage Friday, Jan. 
14th at the home of the officiating 
minister, Rev. R. F. DeMoisey in 
South Walton. Their attendants 
were Mrs. Paul Robinson, sister of 
the groom and Jack Morgan of 
Independence. 



John Thomas Farris S 1-c of 
Gulfport, Miss, is spending a ten- 
day leave with his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas Farris and other 
relatives and friends in Walton. 



Applications for new 1944 Bur- 
ley allotments, must be filed at 
the. Agricultural Conservation 
Office, by February 1, 1944. 

New allotments are for those 
persons who have never establish- 
ed a tobacco allotment on their 
farm and no tobacco has ever 
been grown on the tract of land, 
on which the allotment is to be 
established. 

The information needed on the 
application is the past five years 
of tobacco experience of the 
owner, cash tenant, 'or share 
tenant, the amount of cropland in 
the farm and the amount suitable 
for tobacco. It Is also required 
that the applicant live on the 
farm and obtain a substantial 
portion of his Income from the 
farm. 

No allotment can be established 
unless either the owner, tenant, 
or share cropper has had an In- 
terest In tobacco in the last five 
years, and can meet the require- 
ments regarding farm residence 
and Income from the farm. 

* 



Estel Jackson Bingham 



Estel Jackson Bingham, age 56, 
Railroad Conductor of 1619 Green- 
up St., Covington, Ky. died at 
Booth Hospital, January 12th 
after a lingering illness. 

_ Mr. Bingham was b^rn in Grant 
County, Ky. Nov. 2, 1887. He was 
a member of the Baptist Church. 
His wife Eura Bingham preceded 
him to the»grave "three years ago. 
He is survived by four children, 
Mrs. William Barton, Covington, 
Pvt Pierce Bingham, Ft. Wayne, 
Indiana, Seaman Paul Bingham, 
Pacific Fleet and Park Bingham, 
Covington; three sisters,' Mrs 
Cam Kennedy, Mrs. Ed Sisson and 
Mrs. C. E. Sippe and four brothers, 
Tom, Rube, Aruthur, Ben and 
Otto. ' ■ 

' Funeral services were held Fri- 
day, January I4h at the Mt. Zion 
Baptist Church with Rev. L. N. 
Stamper in charge, with burial 
in the Mt. Zion Cemetery. 

Hamilton Funeral Home of 
Verona having charge of the 
arrangements. *. 



On Saturday, Jan. 15th Mis. W. 
O. Rouse and Mrs. Howard Step- 
henson entertained in the home 
of Mrs. Rouse for the Local Div- 
ision of the Women's Society of 
Christian Service of the Metho- 
dist C hurch. The rejwere seventeen 
members and guests present for 
the noon luncheon which was a 
covered dish affair. At**ne after- 
noon session a study course was 
planned to begin on Monday 
evening, Jan. 24th at 7:00 p. m. 
and continue each Monday and 
Thursday evening at the same 
hour for the next three weeks 
including six night of study. All 
members of the W. S. C. S. (all 
circles) are requested to enroll in 
this study class. The Book is "We 
Who Are America" by Kenneth D. 
Miller. 

Members and guests present 
were: Rev. and Mrs. C. G. Dear- 
ing, Rev. and Mrs. D. E. Bedinger, 
Mrs. R. O. Hughes, Mrs. Pearl 
Bedinger, Mrs. Wm. Lancaster, 
Mrs. Fannie Brittenhelm, Mrs. 
Ollie Robinson, Mrs E. B. Wallace, 
Mrs. C. O. Carlisle, Guy Olen 
Carlisle, Mrs. Sallie R. Miller, 
Miss Emma Jane Miller, Mrs. J. 
F. Jockey, Mrs. Mary Stephenson 
and Joe, and Mrs. Rouse. 



On Wednesday, January 12th 
the Walton Woman's Literary 
Club was entertained in the home 
of Mrs. Clayton Jones with Mrs. 
D. H. Vest as co-hostess. The 
meeting was opened with a prayer 
by Mrs. G. S. Caroland. The pre- 
sident, Mrs. C. F. Blankenbeker 
presided during the business sess- 
ion. Mrs. John Boyer of Verona, 
accepted membership to the club. 
Mrs. W. W. Rouse opened the 
program with the "Thought for 
the Day". This was followed by a 
short patriotic service led by Mrs. 
Clayton Jones. 

The chib was fortunate in hav- 
ing as their guests three of the 
Fifth District officers. The Gover- 
nor, Mrs. B. J. Schwendt of Ft. 
Thomas brought to the club some 
very timely thoughts and based 
her talk on "Woman's Place In 
Present War Work". She also left 
with the" members several good 
points for becoming a good leader. 
Mrs. W. E. Park of Covington, 
chairman of the Press and Pub- 
licity Committee gave a short talk 
on the phase of club work in 
which she is particularity interest 
ed.-Mr& C.-Lewis-Pierce~~of — FT. 
Thomas, Corresponding Secretary 
for the Fifth, District introduced 
herself in- her new work. 

Following the talks by the visit- 
ing officers, a delicious salad 
course was served to the follow- 
ing guests and members: Mrs. B. 
J. Schwendt, Mrs. W. E. Park, 
Mrs. C. Lewis Pierce, Mrs. Ed. 
Jones, Mrs. J. C. Bedinger, Mrs. 
C. F. Blankenbeker, Mrs. John 
Boyer, Mrs. J. R. Conrad, Mrs. G. 
S. Caroland, Mrs. C. S. Chambers, 
Mrs. B. W. Franks, Mrs. E. E. Fry, 
Mrs. A. H. Gaines, Mrs. Cloyd 
Johnson, Miss Emma Jane Miller, 
Mrs. John Myers, Mrs. C. W. 
Ransler, Mrs. W. O. Rouse, Mrs. 
W. W. Rouse, Mrs. J. L. Vest and 
Mrs. E. B. Wallace. 



War Loan Drive 
Precinct Chairmen 
Hold Meeting 



A meeting of the Precinct Chair- 
men of the War Finance Com- 
mittee in" connection with the 
Fourth War Loan Drive was held 
at the Court House last Thursday 
night. Only eight of the twelve 
Chairmen responded to the call 
for this meeting. Those present 
discussed the ways and means for 
raising Boone County's quota of 
$500,000.00, and it was felt that 
more interest must be given to- 
ward the War effort by every one 
in these drives. This country is 
practically the' only country in the 
war that has not suffered from 
bombs being dropped on our 
homes arid which has not suffered 
b$ women and children being 
wounded, torn and bleeding. 

The high. prices for tobacco now! 
being marketed and the high 
wages being paid the factory 
worker is because of those young 
soldiers, bleeding and dying on. the. v 
battle fields of foreign countries. 
Can you look a soldier in the face 
when he returns knowing that you 
have been spared hardships -of war 
and been permitted to remain at 
home making money while he has 
suffered the torments of Hell for 
you without knowing that you 
have gone the limSt* in "purchasing 
War Bonds in this Fourth War 
Loan Bond Drive now in progress/* 1 - ** 
Wake up Boone County citizens, 
there is a war going on, and get 
behind this Fourth War Bond 
Drive. Don't purchase a small 
bond and think you have done 
your duty. You have only done 
your duty when you buy to youl" 
•very limit. wfa- 

Go to your bank at once and 
make your subscription. The cou- * 
pon bonds purchased before Feb- 
urary 1st will not carry Jkny 
accured interest to be paid. After 
that date you must pay accured 
interest. It is to your interest to 
subscribe before February 1st, 
however the drives does not close 
until February 15th. 

Let's have a good report for our 
County papers next week. 

A. D. Yelton is again serving as 
Co-chairman with Mr. Renaker, 
and has charge of publicity and 
other details of the drive. 



Thomas Dwyer 



Mr. Thomas Dwyer, 70, retired 
farmer of Verona died suddenly of 
a heart attack at his home Mon- 
day, January 17th. He was born. 
'- i n Vero na-andr-haTl~nveorQiere all 
his life. 

He is survived by his wife, Susie 
Kennedy Dywer; one daughter, 
Mrs. Porter Stephenson of Cov- 
ington, Ky. and, a grandaughter, 
Willeta Stephenson, Covington; 
five sisters, Mrs. Lawrence Ryan, 
Walton; Mrs. Kate Ryan, Verona; 
Mrs. Thomas Maloney, Madison- 
ville, Ohio; Mrs. Edward Roberts, 
Paris, 111. and Mrs. Martha Ryan, 
Louisville, Ky.; and one brother, 
Ben Dwyer, Hume, 111. 

Funeral services were held at 
the Hamilton Funeral Home Wed- 
nesday, January. 19th at 3 p. m. 
with burial in New Bethel Ceme- 
tery. 



Woman's Aid Society 



Delegates Attend 
Farm Bureau 
Convention 



- Lloyd Siekman, Harold Crigler, 
Boone County Farm Bureau dele- 
gates and H. R. Forkner, county 
agent attended the State Farm 
Bureau Convention at Louisville* 



The regular monthly meeting 
of the Woman's Aid Society of the 
Walton Christian Church met at 
the horiie of Mrs. Elra Vallanding- 
ham on the 3 L Highway, Thurs- 
day, with Mrs. W. Pennington, 
president having charge of the 
program, other members present 
were: Rev. and Mrs. Go. S. Caro- 
land, Mrs. Delia Percival, Mrs. 
William Campbell, Mrs. Ed Mann, 
Mrs. Clifford Northcutt, Mrs. Ora 
Fry, Mrs. Edwin Johnson, Mrs. 
Gilbert Groger, Miss Alicia Neu- 
meister, Mrs. Harris Moore, Mrs. 
Harry Bird, Mrs. Nich Welsh, Mrs. 
George Fisher and Miss Libb 
Ingram. 

A very interesting meeting and 



Farmers Plan To 
Attend Farm And 
Home Convention 



Waste Paper To Be 
Collected Saturday. 



on last Wednesday, Thursday, and aocM tlme was enjoyed by aU ' 
Friday of last week. 

The delegates report the best 
Farm Bureau convention on re- 
cord with more than 800 delegates 
attending. Alex Calvert of Mason 
County was re-elected president 
and J. E. Stanford, secretary of 
the State Federation. The nat- 
ional goal for 1944 Is 1,000,000 
farm family memberships. 

The county delegates expressed 
confidence that the county goal 
of 100 members would be exceeded 
this year. 



Every citizen is urged to have 
their waste peper and maga- 
zines tied together and on the 
sidewalk in front of their home 
Saturday morning, January 22. 

The paper will be collected 
and sold, the school will re- 
ceive the money. 



A number of Boone County 
farmers have made plans to 
attend the Annual Farm and 
Home Convention at the College 
of Agriculture at Lexington Jan- 
uary 25th-28thh. 

The Wednesday and Thursday 
meetings are expected to attract 
largest attendance from the 
county. The Wednesday meeting 
will be devoted to the 1944 farm 
outlook and to national farm 
problems. The Thursday meeting 
will include a wide variety of 
special meetings on farm pro- 
duction problems including soils, 
crops, dairying, poultry, Veter- 
inary and Horticulture and the 
rural church. The Friday meeting 
will be devoted to soils, livestock 
and dairying. 

Plans are being made to aid all 
local' people possible to their 
plans of travel to and from the 
meetings. Those woh do not have 
a way to go or those who are going 
and have extra room to their cars 
are urged to notify the County 
Agent's Office.. 



'?• 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



Thursday, January 20, 1944 



Brighten Chairs With 
Colorful Slip Covers 



WEEKLY NEWS ANALYSIS 



.,». ._> 



StM. 




Congress Studies National Service Act; 
Russia Asks Creation of New Frontiers; 
Tighten Deferments to Ease Dad Draft; 
Senate Votes to Freeze Security Tax 

i EDITOrVS NOTE: When opinion* are expressed In these column*, they are those of 
HcM.ru r«ewspaper Union's news analysts and not necessarily of this newspaper.) 

— — ^— — — — _>n Released by Western Newspaper Union. _^^_^^_ 




TEIEFACT 



HOW PRE-PEARl HARBOR FATHERS 

WILL BE CLASSIFIED 

mmo Mk 



DEFERRED 



ARE you letting a shabby chair 
"**■ mar the looks of your home? 
Don't do it! These easy-to-follow 
■lipcover directions make it pos- 
sible for you to dut, fit and finish 
them like a professional. Begin 
now! 

• • • 

Instructions 73g7 contain step-by -step di- 
rections for making slip covers for varied 
•hairs and sofas; material suggestions. 



Sewing Circle Needlecraft Dftpt, 
564 W. Randolph St. Chicago 80, HI. 

Enclose 15 cents (plus one cent to 
cover cost of mailing) for Pattern 

No 

Nam* , 

Address 



ESSENTIAL FOR 
INDUSTRIES & FARMS 




PHYSICAL!* 
UNFIT 




HARDSHIP 
CASES 



Pressure Groups Point Way 
To Mild Fascism in U; S. 

Government by Majority Rule Ceases to 
Exist When Various 'Interests' Begin 
Trading Votes for Concessions. , 




riHr^ffHH r ^Wr^r* » >l 



£* 



*WWr>ryry 



Improved 

Uniform 

International 



SUNDAY 
SCHOOL 

-:- LESSON^ 

By HAROLD L. LUNDQUIST, D. D. 
Of The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago. 
Released by Western Newspaper Union. 



Lesson for January 23 

Lesson subjects nnd Scripture texts se- 
lected and copyrighted by- International 
Council of Religious Education; used by 
permission. 



, By BAUKHAGE 

/Veins Analyst and Commentator. 



\ J SOOTHES CHAFED SKIN 

MOROLINE 

WHITE PETROLEUM JELLY 




Walk on Gems 

Pulverized garnets (in coarse 
• grains), mixed with a plastic or 
resin binder, are now applied to 
decks, passages, etc., of our battle- 
ships, cruisers and smaller craft 
to prevent accidents due to slip- 
ping. 



• 



AT FIRST 
SIGN OF A 



c 



ov» 



use 666 

«66 TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DROPS 

Bayonets From Bayonne 
Bayonets afre so named because 
they were firs£ made in the town 
of Bayonne, Prance, in 1671. 



/• YOU WOMEN WHO SUFFER FROMv 

HOT FLASHES 

If you suffer from hot flashes, 
weak, nervous, cranky feelings, are 
a bit blue at times — due to the 
functional "middle-age" period 
peculiar to women — try Lydia E 
Pinkham's Vegetable Compound 
to relieve such symptoms. Taken 
regularly— Pinkham's Compound ' 
helps build up resistance against 
such distress. It helps nature! 
Also a fine stomachic tonic. Fol- 
low label directions. 

LYDIA E. PINKHAM'S $283$ 



Romans Started It 

Early Romans were the first to 
tat asparagus. 



NOSE MUST DRAIN 

To Relieve Head Cold Miseries 
When head colds strike, help nose ' 
drain, dear the way for freer breathing ' 
comfort with lONDON'S MASAI JELLY. At dnigfisJs. 





Try Great Tonic Many Doctors Advise 

See how good-tasting Scott's Emulsion 
helps tone up your system; helps build 
up stamina and resistance against colds— 
if there is a dietary deficiency of A & D 
Vitamins. It's easy I Simply take Scott's 
daily throughout the year. It's great I Buy 
at your druggist's today! 



$ /^SCOTT'S 
EMULSION 

~ Great Tear-Round Tonic 



DRAFT: 

Tighten Deferments 

In an. effort to ease the dads' 
draft, Selective Service officials 
called a halt to the granting of oc- 
cupational deferments to youths be- 
tween 18 and 21, except those en- 
gaged in agriculture. 

As a result of the order, at least 
115,000 non-fathers are expected 
to become eligible for induction, al- 
though 11,000 dads between 18 and 
21 will fall under the new regula- 
tion. 

High school students are to be al- 
lowed to complete their education, 
but college deferments will be sus« 
pended'^except for critical courses 
like medicine, dentistry or veteri- 
nary, and the number of youths per- 
mitted .to major in scientific fields 
after graduation- will be restricted 
to 10,000. , ytl . 

Although! 446 v 000 fathers** were ex- 
pected to be called by January 1, 
only 90,000 actually were Inducted. 

RUSSIA: . 

Polish Boundaries 

Declaring that it does not consider 
prewaS- Poland's 193fl borders, un- 
changeable, Russia proposed the 
creation of new frontiers along lines 
suggested by Great Britain in 1919, 
which would place White Russia and 
the western Ukraine in the Soviet 
union. 

Brought to the fore by the Red 
armies' advance into the disputed 
territory of prewar Poland, the 
boundary question has found the 
Poles' government-in-exile in Lon- 
don insisting on restoration of the 
prewar frontier. In its latest pro- 
posal, Russia suggested that the 
Poles annex other territory inhab- 
ited by its people* like East Prussia, 
to lay the foundation for a postwar 
state. 

Reds Surge On 

As argument over the Polish east- 
em boundary went on, Russian 
ged— forward— in—eastern 
prewar Poland and gradually ham- 
mered down the German front in the 
great Dnieper bend. 

With one eye • peeled on Allied 
movements in western Europe 
where invasion preparations were 
underway, the German high com- 
mand fought a defensive war, re- 
fusing to throw in its mobile re- 
serves "into a large scale action in 
the east. 

Instead, the German policy ap- 
peared to be maximum resistance 
to the Russian steamroller until su- 
perior forces necessitated a with- 
drawal, and repeated troop move- 
ments along the wide front to pre- 
vent a complete Russian break- 
through to their rear, where encir- 
clement might trap their entire 
forces. 

EUROPE: 
Pound Balkans 

As the invasion hour drew near, 
huge Allied forces were being 
massed in Britain, with the Germans 
saying reconnaissance showed that 
the attack might take the form of 
a pincers movement against the con- 
tinent. ' 

As both sides girded for the show- 
down in the west, U. S. filers struck 
hard at German supply and' com- 
munication centers in the Balkans, 
particularly pounding the Bulgarian 
capital of Sofia, hub for railroads 
radiating to Rumania and Jugrr- 
slavia. 

In Italy, U. S. troops continued 
their advance, beating through tan- 
gled German defenses with machine 
gun and mortar fire, after heavy ar- 
tillery preparation. 



LABOR DRAFT: 
Urged by FDR 

To hasten the war's end, Presi- 
dent Roosevelt urged enactment of 
a labor draft as paft>of a broad war- 
time legislative program, which also 
included: 

1. A bill to tax all unreasonable 
individual and corporate profit; 

2. Continuation of the present law 
to rewrite war contracts to remove 
excessive-costs; 

3. A Jaw placing minimum prices 
on farm products and ceilings on 
consumer prices through subsidies. 

4. Continuation of the price and 
wage fixing law, expiring June 30. 

Of the labor draft, FDR said: 
"... I recommend ... a national 
service act which for the duration 
of the war will prevent strikes, and, 
with certain appropriate exceptions, 
will make available for war produc- 
tion or for any other essential serv- 
ices every able-bodied adult in this 
nation." . 

Freeze Security Tax 

With the_ social security reserve 
fund for 1944 estimated at five times 
the amount of payments due in any 
of the next five years, the senate 
cast a 48 to 17 vote to keep the so- 
cial security payroll tax at 1 per 
cent each for employee and employ- 
er. 

Although Senator Barkley (Ky.) 
declared extension of the low rate 
now would only mean increase of 
the rate later on to meet cost of 
disbursements, Senator George (Ga.) 
said the present 1 per cent rate 
would "completely protect the sol- 
vency of the old age and survivors 
benefit fund." 

Retention of the present rate would 
save employees and employers alike 
1*4 billion dollars a- year over the 
proposed doubling of contributions, 
Senator Vandenberg (Mich.) said. 
The senate's action marked the third 
time it blocked a rise in the rate. 



WNU Service, Union Trust Building, 
Washington, D..C. 
At a recent White House press and 
radio conference, the President was 
explaining his pre-Christmas remark 
—that It was* time to discard the 
term "New Deal"— the remark that 
gave the cartoonists so much fun. 
He used a fable about "Old Dr. New 
Deal" who had healed the patient of 
"internal troubles" (the depres- 
sions). But when the patient had an 
accident and had broken his arms 
and legs, he had to call in his part- 
ner "Dr. Win-the-War" to heal him. 
A correspondent asked: "Doesn't 
that add up to a fourth term declara- 
tion?" 

The President showed his Irrita- 
tion in his answer. He said that 
that hadn't been under discussion, 
that the question was picayune. 
Then he caught himself, leaned 
back, half smiled, half apologized, 
with the remark thatj^ ~ ?*t*oner 
would understand that he had to an- 
swer that way. 

Two things came to my mind at 
once. First, that the President was 
thinking about the war and postwar 
problems, and to be brought back 
to earth with a bump was ve|ry much 
like being awakened by ah alarm 
clock in the midst of an /interest- 
ing dream. That was one thing I 
thought of. J 

Another was just what the United 
States, and the whole world for that 
matter, would be suffering from aft- 
er the war and what the cure would 
be. if any. , , ■■ 

Recently there have been several 
predictions that we were in "for a 
dose of mild fascism." 



SOLDIER VOTE 









■' 1 






HI -* & 


■tie. < 

■VQEa 


W : -. * 




■ \ jftl 






■\. ^M 




E » 

1 ' *%* 



^ Gov. Ellis Arnall 
soldier vote bill. 



(seated) signs 



First state to pass legislation on 
soldier voting, Georgia's bill calls 
for ballots to be sent servicemen 
overseas after they have registered 
through applications mailed to them 
by request of themselves or friends. 
Servicemen will return the regis- 
tration applications and then the 
ballots by mail. 

Designed to simplify balloting by 
the state's 250,000 servicemen, 'Geor- 
gia's soldiers' vote bill was passed 
after five days' debate, then speed- 
ily signed by 35-year-old Governor 
Ellis Arnall. 

Second state to shape a soldiers' 
vote bill was West Virginia, which 
permits a serviceman's family to 
register for him, with ballots re- 
turnable up to election day. 



HIGHLIGHTS 



in the week's) nevo$ 



INCOMES: A decline of 3 per 
cent in individual incomes was noted 
in November, compared with Octo- 
ber, the commerce department re- 
ports. Nevertheless, November fig- 
ures were 16 per cent, or 12 billion 
dollars, above the November, 1942, 
totals, which were about 10Mt bil- 
lion dollars. Total income for 1943 
is estimated at 142 billion dollars, 
highest in history. 



BABY CARRIAGES: All restric- 
tions on the use of steel in manu- 
facture of baby carriages, push- 
carts, strollers and walkers have 
been removed by the WPB. Im- 
provement in the steel supply is giv- 
en as the explanation. An. estimat- 
ed 800,000 metal carriages will be 
produced during the year, if steel 
becomes available in sufficient 
quantity. 



Background for Belief 

I never took that so very seriously 
until three news items were called 
to my attention. One was the state- 
ment that the CIO committee of po- 
litical action was planned as a nu- 
cleus of a labor party. That didn't 
smell of fascism but it had a slightly 
collectivist aroma. 

The next item was in the London 
News Letter, a little pamphlet edit- 
ed by Commander King-Hall, mem- 
ber of parliament, the contents of 
which are cabled to Toronto, Can- 
ada, where it is printed as an Amer- 
ican edition. King-Hall is an inde- 
pendent in politics with slightly con- 
servative leanings. 

Here are the excerpts to which I 
refer: 

"... There are many Indi- 
cations at what might be called 
the lower levels of domestic 
practice, that there are forces 
and tendencies at wprkJn Brit- 
ain which are going' to produce 
great changes in our political 
system. Some of these changes 
were foreshadowed in a pam- 
phlet entitled "The Future of 
Party Politics" written by Com- 
mander King-Hall in 1937. It 
was there argued that a crisis, 
both domestic and international, 
was developing and demanding 
for its solution a high degree of 
national unity in Britain, and 
that the political expression of 
that unity, and the instrument 
for making it effective must be 
a national government ..." 
In other words, the writer means 
by a "national government" a co- 
alition government such as England 
has now with no opposition — what 
amounts to a single party. 

The Mood in Britain 

And here is another excerpt, a 
quotation from a speech in the house 
of commons which the London News 
Letter says was given a "wide meas- 
ure of assent." 

". . . Government must al- 
ways be by majority but let it 
not be by party, controversy and 
party majority. In this country 
at the present time, there seems 
to be coming into being a cen- 
tral body of opinion very well 
and adequately represented on 
all sides of this house. It is to 
that central body of opinion that 
J. should like the government 
to appeal In a bolder and more 
forward-stepping policy . . ." 
This speaker continues his appeal 
for a single "central body of opin- 
ion" and warns against "dividing a 
people (the British) who provide 
•ome bridge between the extreme 
capitalism of the United States and 
the extreme collectivism of Russia." 



Just what all this was getting at, 
I understood a little better when I 
read an article by Freda Kirchway 
in the Nation on the mood in Britain. 
Miss Kirchway had interviewed a 
number of people in England and 
she says that "big business forces 
in England have recognized more 
clearly than these forces in Amer- 
ica the need for government con- 
trol." They are ready, she says, 
to accept the government as a part- 
ner to save themselves from liquida- 
tion. 

Some of the people interviewed by 
Miss Kirchway gave her the impres- 
sion that they saw in the set-up 
ahead "a successful, polite form of 
semi-fascism," which will prove ac 
ceptable to the key people of these 
groups. She doesn't agree with this 
herself and she believes British la- 
bor will be ready to fight it at the 
second election after peace but she 
believes these people believe it. 

How much of a similar feeling ex- 
ists in the United States, I do not 
know, but, quite independent of Eng- 
land, many people are shrugging 
their shoulders and saying it is a 
possibility here. 

. One thing may point in that direc- 
tion. That is the way the various 
pressure groups are now operating 
in congress. Already many trades 
have been made even to the point 
of those "unholy alliances" (all alli- 
ances except those in which we be- 
long are unholy, of course) which it 
was charged in the senate had been 
forme* between southern Democrats 
and some northern Republicans. 

As soon as powerful pressure 
groups can agree among themselves 
to trade concessions for votes, gov- 
ernment by majority rule ceases 
and the moment you begin to break 
down the party lines, you are in 
danger of having one party which 
in the end is no party. 

I can well understand how when 
anyone contemplates the problems 
of our domestic affairs in the post- 
war period, it is hard to keep one's 
mind on the war. 

• • • 

The Change in 

Invasion Plana 

It is a perilous thing these days 
to write more than anshour in ad- 
vance of the invasion if one uses 



JESUS TEACHES IN PARABLES 

LESSON TEXT— Mark 4:1-9. 263J. 
GOLDEN TEXT— If any man hath ears 
to hear, let him hear.— Mark 4:23. 



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CREMATION 



Parables were often used by our 
Lord, particularly when He had 
truth to reveal which was not for 
unbelieving hearts that had hard- 
ened themselves against it (see 
Matt. 13:10-16). 

The method is that of telling an 
earthly story, true to life (hence, not 
a fable), which is placed alongside 
of the spiritual truth it is designed 
to" teach. It thus differs from an 
allegory, which gives the meaning 
with the story (see John 15:1-6). 
--Jesus used parables in our lesson 
to teach the truth that the good seed 
of the Word of God will be received 
in various ways and will bring forth 
widely differing results. He— the 
Lord — was the Sower, and the field 
was the world (Matt., 13:37, 38). .. 
We note first that in that field 
there were and are — 

I. Four Kinds of Soil (Mark 
4:1-9). ; 

The reception of the seed Is de- 
termined by the condition of the soiL 
The great field was essentially of one 
kind of soil, but it had become wide- 
ly different in its ability to take in 
the seed and bear fruit. 

The interpretation of this parable 
is given by our Lord in the verses 
immediately following (vv. 3-20). It 
has striking application to our day. 
A road, or beaten pathway, was a 
common thing in the fields of Pales- 
tine. On such hard soil a seed found 
no place to grow, and the birds car- 
ried it away. Such is the condition 
of a man who permits the heavy 
and sinful traffic of this world to 
harden his heart against spiritual 
truth. 4 If our heart has reached that 
stage we should ask God to break 
it up. The birds (always a symbol 
of evil in the Bible) are Satan and 
his emissaries. They are always 
busy about carrying away the Word 
of God when it is truly preached. 

The rocky soil was a thin layer of 
good soil on a rocky ledge. At first 
this caused rapid growth, but with- 
out deep roots it could not survive 
the heat of summer. This is the one 
who enthusiastically responds to the 
gospel appeal, but being without real 
conviction and repentance, he has 
no stability when persecution comes. 
The thorny ground— where the 
growing grain was choked by weeds 
—typifies the professed believer who 
lives in worldliness. The friend of 



CREMATION ■»*«»■•, i a Z'» ary 

Preierve The Remain, of Your loved One* 

VISIT THE NEW HILLSIDE CHAPEL 

9:00 A. M. la 4:00 P. M. 

Writ* far D—criptit* BookUt 

CINCINNATI CREMATION CO. 

525 Dlx myth Ave. C Inc Inn. tl 20, O Wo 



If you were to say the first bugle 
call of the day in the Army is 
"Reveille"^you'd be wrong. It's 
"First Call." But you probably 
know what cigarette gets first call 
with Army men— it's Cajpel. And 
Camel is the favorite with men in 
all branches of the service — Navy, 
Marines, Coast Guard, too. (Based 
on actual sales records from serv- 
ice men's stores.) And though 
there are Post Office restrictions 
on packages to overseas Army 
men, you can still send Camels 
to soldiers in the U. S., and to 
men in the Navy, Marines, and 
Coast Guard wherever they art. 
-Adv. 




Just 3 drops Penetro 
Nose Drops In each 
nostril help you 
breathe freer almost 
instantly. Relieve the 
head cold nasal misery. 
Only 25c— 24 times as 
much for 50c. Caution: 
Use only as directed. 
Penetro Note Drops 



Lazy Cuckoo 

The European cuckoo bird lays 
its small egg on the ground and 
then picks it up and deposits it in 
the nest of another bird. 



Acid Indigestion 

RHieved .n 5 minutes or double money back 

When excesj stomach acid causes painful, suffoeat- 
fafT Kan. sour stomach and heartburn, doctors usually 
prescribe the fastest- acting rm-di fines known for 
symptomatic relief— medicines like those In Bell- ana 
Tablet*. No laxative. Bell-ans brings comfort In a 
jiff y or doubls^your money pack on return of bottle 



the future tense. The majority of j the wor ld is God's enemy (James 



opinion "as I write" (that's the sav 
ing line) believes that the inva- 
sion won't get under way until late 
spring although one report through 
Sweden said the Germans were ex- 
pecting it between Christmas and 
New Year's. 

But from the time that General 
Eisenhdwer was named as com- 
mander and t he ot her— ch ang o a in 
command were named, it appeared 
that the shape of the whole Allied 
plans for the assault on fortress 
Europa began to change rapidly. 
The speed with which the Russian 
armies were moving toward the 
German frontiers set new forces 
in motion. 

Suddenly the Mediterranean be- 
came less important in the picture 
as Washington saw it. Ifwas point- 
ed out that the British had a larger 
force of men, ships and supplies in 
that theater than the Americans. 
What had seemed the most impor- 
tant thing in Europe to America 
ever since our troops landed in 
North Africa suddenly grew less im- 
portant. The Middle East, which 
had looked as if it were the gather- 
ing point of a new blow through the 
Balkans, perhaps with the help of 
Turkey, shrank on the horizon. The 
shifting of British commanders 
seemed to make this clear. 

And then there were calls for 
greater speed on the part of the 
.Allies, it seemed as if a fear that 
Russia might get to Berlin first was 
stirring new activity and there were 
stories that Spain was not as anxious 
for Allied friendship as she was to 
keep the "Bolshevists" from getting 
nearer her borders, that if she must 
make new enemies, at least it was 
better to have the Allies against her 
than to have Russia get too near 
her. 

But even without these rumors, it 
grew clearer and clearer that the job 
ahead was colossal. Hopes that Ger- 
many could be brought down by 
bombing alone were given up. It 
really ' seemed as if her factories 
and indeed her cities had moved 
underground. 



BRIEFS 



by Baukhage 



Ernesto Lecuona, chief song writ- 
er of Cuba and cultural attache of 
the Cuban Embassy in Washington, 
has recently signed one of the larg- 
est song publishing contracts of 
Broadway history. 

• • • 

Colombia's entrance into the war 
November 27 makes it the 14th 
A~^ican republic to join actively in 
the struggle against the Nazis. 



Suspender buttons are to be re- 
stored to men's work pants, accord- 
ing to an amendment of WPB'i Or- 
der L-181. 

• • •■ 

The navy's famous PT boats and 
all they have accomplished is owed 
to the mahogany tree of Middle 
America and to the men of history 
who discovered its value in ship 
building. 



4:4). Note the things which destroy 
spiritual life (v. 19), and shun them. 
In the good ground — open to receive 
and ready to yield itself for the 
growth of the seed— there is abun- 
dant harvest. Even here there is a 
difference in the amount of fruit 
Why not be a "hundredfold" be- 
liever? 

Changing, .the picture a little our 
LorcTnpw speaks of— 

II. Normal Growth and a Good 
Harvest (4:26-29). 

This parable, found only in Mark, 
has a lesson for the sower. He is 
not to expect the harvest Immedi- 
ately after the time of sowing. There 
is a period of patient waiting while 
God is producing the growth (and 
only He can do it!)— then the joy of 
harvest. 

There are many lessons to learn 
here. We who serve the Lord in 
teaching or preaching the Word are 
too impatient, too eager to be able 
to announce results. God is always 
willing that things should mature 
naturally and in due season. Let 
us wait for Him and be at rest in 
our spirits (v. 27). 

Then let us be glad as the seed 
begins to show signs of maturing, 
but let us not be slow to gather 
the harvest when it is ready. Some 
forget to gather the spiritual fruit 
of their labors, possibly having long 
since lost patience and interest 

We should also be encouraged by 
this parable to continue sowing the 
seed, knowing that It will find place 
In the hearts of some and bring forth 
fruit unto eternal life. 

Next we are warned to be on our 
guard against accepting or approv- 
ing- 
Hi. Abnormal Growth and an Evil 
Harvest (4:30-32). 

The mustard is an herb, not a 
tree; hence this parable gave warn- 
ing that there would be an over- 
grown religious system calling itself 
Christian. The birds are (as in the 
parable of the kinds of Soil) evil 
men, or "isms," or organizations 
eager to take shelter in a religious 
system without spiritual power. 

The church had such an abnormal 
growth when Constantine espoused 
Christianity as a political move, 
mixed it with paganism, and ele- 
vated it to a position of worldly 
power. 

All this was and still is contrary 
to God's plan for the church. He 
wanted a spiritual body distinguished 
by lowliness, meekness and service. 
These are the things that mark the 
true Christian spirit The marks of 
true Christianity are always those 
of likeness to Him who said: "I am 
meek and lowly in heart" who came 
"not to be ministered unto but to 
minister." 



Druggists recommend 

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Relieves pain and soreness 



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to reduce swelling and check bleeding. 
Fourth, It's easy to use. PAZO oint- 
ment's perforated Pile Pipe makes ap- 
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can tell you about PAZO ointment. 



Get PAZO Today! At Drugstores! 



Wildcat Was Sacred 

The wildcat was once a sacred 
animal in Egypt. 



How To Relieve 
Bronchitis 

Creomulslon relieves promptly be- 
cause it goes right to the seat of the 
trouble to help loosen and expel 

germ laden phlegm, and aid nature 
> soothe and heal raw, tender, In- 
flamed bronchial mucous mem- 
branes. Tell your druggist to sell yon 
s bottle of Creomulslon with the un- 
derstanding you must like the way 11 
Quickly allays the cough or you an 
to have your money back. 

CREOMULSION 

for Coughs, Chest Colds, Bronchitis 



Black '^;- s 
Leaf 40 



JUST A 

DASH IN FEATHERS. 



OR SPREAD ON ROOSTS 



Get Your War Bonds . * 
* To Help Ax the Axis 



WNU— E 



3-44 



When Your 
Back Hurts- 



And Your Strength and 
Energy Is Below Par 

II may be caused by disorder of kid- 
ney function that permits poisonous 
waste to accumulate. For truly many 
people feel tired, weak and miserable 
when the Iddneys tail to remove excess 
acids and other waste matter from the 
blood. 

Yotl may ruder nagglnf backache, 
rheumatic pains, headaches, dizziness, 
retting op nights, leg pains, swelling. 
Sometimes frequent and scanty urina- 
tion with smarting and burning is an- 
other sign that something is wrong with 
the Iddneys or bladder. 

Than should be no doubt that prompt 
treatment la wiser than neglect. Use 
/Toon's Pills. It la better to rely on a 
medicine that baa won countrywide ap- 

E>val than on something leas favorably 
own. Detm'e have been tried and test- 
ed many years. An at all drug stores. 
Get Dean's today. 



doans Pills 



h 



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A 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 

•«. 



$ 



~~* — UNION PRESBYTERIAW'-*' 

CHURCH 

M. A. WDmesherr, Pastor 

Sunday School, 11:00 a. m., E> 
W. T. 

Morning Worship, 12:00 N., E. 
W. T. 

Evening Service, 8:30 p. m„ 
E. W. T. 

Services every second and forth 
Sundays. 



BIG BONE BAPTIST >„L*RCH 



Sunday School at 10:00 a. m., 
(CWT), Harry Rouse, Supi. 

Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m., 
(CWT). 

B. T. U. at 7:00 p. m., (CWT). 

Evening Worship at 7:45 p. m., 
(CWT). 

Services each Sunday. You are 
cordially Invited to worship with 
us 



WALTON BAPTIST- CHURCBr 

Walton, Ky. 



Bible School 10:00 a. m, 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 0:30 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed., 7:30 p. m. 

INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

W. E. Maners, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. u 7:00 p. m. 

Evangelist Services .... 8:00 p. m. 
Prayer and Bible Study, 
Wednesday 8:00 p.m. 



NEW BA NK LIC K BAPTIST 

CHURCH 
Rev. Frank Lipscomb, Pastor 
Sunday School at 10 a. m. Supt. 
E. A. Lipscomb. 
Morning Worship at 11 si. m. 
Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 
On second and fourth Sundays 



W. E. TAIT, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 

Specializing In the 

correction and 

protection of 

EYESIGHT 



27 E. 7th St 

COVINGTON, KY. 




Tobacco Stalks Worth - 
$15.00 Per Ton. 



Tobacco stalks properly handled 
are valuable fertilizer according 

to H. R. Porkner, County Agent. 
Recent work at the Expriment 
Station indicates that if the 
fertilizer in a ton of stalks was 
purchased it would cost approxi- 
mately $15.00. 

■ This valuable fertilizer when 
properly used will return three or 
four times this amount in increas- 
ed crop yields. The unfortunate 
part is that the fertilizer In the 
stalks is highly soluble in water 
and if left out in the weather and 
not applied to the growing crop 
most of the value is quickly "lost 
One good local farmer the past 
week pointed out the practical 
difficulty in finding a suitable 
place to spread the stalks this 
time of the year, it was suggested 
putting them in a temporary loft 
in the tobacco barn, chopping 
them up in spare time and spread- 
ing on new grass and clover seed- 
ings so that there will., be no 
difficulty In raking the hay crop. 
Each farmer will have his own 
individual problem on how to best 
handle the stalks. The important 
thing to remember is that in war 
times tobacco stalks are too valu- 
able to leave out in the weather. 



SOIL CONSERVATION NEWS 
By J. Casper Acree 



Soil erosion continues, even 
with the greatest of care. We have 
often thought that our soil eros- 
ion problems were over when we 
sowed our fields to alfalfa or grass. 
It is a good practice when sowing 
alfalfa or any other grasses to sow 
a.mixture of legumes-and^jereaaial 
grasses: 1. e. alfalfa and orchard 
grass, alfalfa and timothy or 
bluegrass. One of the best com- 



binatoff E alfalfa and orchard 
grass. Also one of the best ways to 
get a bluegrass sod is to sow blue- 
grass with alfalfa. Of course 
alfalfa will not grow if the land 
isn't sweet. Limea nd phosphate 
are very essential. 

The effectiveness of grass in 
preventing erosion is shown by an 
experiment carried on at the 
Missouri Experiment station over 
a fourteen year period. The field 
had a 3.68 feet fall per 100 feet. 
Prom data compiled it j|yould take 
3043 years for the soil to erode 7 
inches where a blue grass sod was 
established but only 50 years if 
cultivated to continous corn. In 
other words corn ground will erode 
or wash away 60 times faster than 
sod land. Taking into consider- 
ation (4J, the labor involved to 
plow, cultivate and harvest a corn 
crop, (2) The cost of re-establish- 
ing a sod, ,(3) the greater amount 
of soil lost by erosion, (4) the 
actual value of corn harvested 
compared to the grazing value or 
hay crop, (5) also corn is more apt 
to be sold as corn or in animals 
than grass or hay. Can we afford 
to grow corn in Boone County. For 
this weeks problem, figure out 
what you would have to get per 
bushel for your corn that would 
Justify, you to plow up a good sod. 
Isn't it about time to cast aside 
the plow with the shovel and the 
hoe and pick up the mowing 
machine with the fiddle and the 
bow. More Harmony. 



CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Walton, Ky. 



Geo. S. Caroland, Minister 
Church School 10:00 a. m 

Helen Ruth Gardiner, Supt. 
Worship, Lord's Supper 11:00 a. m. 
Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 



GOSHEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Finer, Kentucky 



INDEPEN DENCE CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 



Lee Doty, Minister 

Sunday School— 10:00 a. m. 

Worship and |i Communion— 
11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship— 8:00 p. m. 

You are cordially invited to 
attend any and all services. 



Cecil F. McKee, Pastor 

Services 2nd and 4th Sundays. 
10:00 A. M. Sunday School. 
11:00 A. M. Church Service 1 . 
6:00 P. M. Christian Youth 
Fellowship. 
7:30 P. M. Evening Service. 



ffFlR! 
PGNC 



c; 



Y666 



•66 TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DROPS 



RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 



M. A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 

Sunday School, 10:00 a. m. 
Morning Worship, 11:00 a. m. 
Evening Worship, 7:00 p. m. 
Services every first and .third 
Sundays.' 



Cooking 
the Axis Goose 




TJLANES, tanks, guns, ships, munitions, flowing 
-IT from Southern industry, are literally writing the 
history of Axis defeat on every battle front . . . cook- 
ing the Axis goose — Southern style! 

Blazing blast fttroacesr giant steel mills; enormous 
tin plate plants, and numerous fabricators and fin- 
ishers of iron and steel products in five Southern 
states served by the L & N Railroad have furnished 
a large portion of the Nation's contribution of es- 
sential production to the great war. 

A mighty train of 1 1 2,000 cars, crowding the L&N 
main track from Cincinnati to New Orleans, 950 
miles, would carry only a part of the annual South- 
ern production of steel and its products. Hordes 
of additional trains are required to handle the inci- 
dental ore, stone, coal, coke, manganese and other 
things essential to steel manufacture. 

This constitutes a miracle of production and trans- 
portation — Free Enterprise at work in Southern 
industry and railroad transportation — can any 
other nation or any other form of government match 
such performance? 

In peace times the growth of the South has been 
constant if not so spectacular. No agency has con- 
tributed thereto more than railroad transportation. 
None will do more in the future.. ■ 

The L&N, The Old Reliable, hopes to keep modern 
in its facilities and service and thus merit the good 
will and patronage of its peoples. 




President 

LOUISVILLE t NASHVILLE RAILROAD 

i 

BUY WAR BONDS FOR VICTORY 




Y e i t e r d ay . . . Today . . . Tomorrow 



WALTON METHODIST CHURCH 

Walton, Kentucky 

Rev. C. G., Dearing, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Youth Fellowship 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Service 7:00 p. m. 



NEW. BETHEL BAP. CHURCH 

Verona, Kentucky 
Rev. Shirley Spain- , Pastor 

Preaching services every 1st and 
3rd Sunday. 

Sunday School 10. a. m. 

Morning Worship ll a. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed 8 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

All times given Central War Time 



»••*•«« 



KEEP ON 

• WITH WAR BONDS • 



* • * * 



• * * * 



BOWEL CLEANING POWER 
OF ERB-HELP MEDICINE 



One man recently took ERB- 
HELP three days and said after- 
ward that he never would have 
believed his body contained so 
much filthy substance. He says his 
stomach, intestines,- bowels— an_ 
whole system were so thoroughly 
cleansed that his constant head- 
aches came to an end, several 
pimply skin eruptions on his face 
dried up overnight, and even the 
rheumatic pains in his knees dis- 
appeared. At present he is an 
altogether different man .feeling 
fine in every way.. 

ERB-HELP contains 12 Great 
Herbs; they cleanse bowels, clear 
gas from stomach, act on sluggish 
liver and kidneys. Miserable peo- 
ple soon feel different all over. So 
don't go on suffering! Get ERB- 
HELP. Jones Drug Store. 



9-Q 



EYESTRAIN 

Are you conscious of B 
strain when you read fine 
print' 

Perhaps you need glasses. 
I Consult us today. 

L J. METZGER 

Optometrist OptlcUa 

€81 Madison Ava. 

Osrlngtoa 

Serving North©™ Kentucky 
With Comfortebto Kyedght 



When In Covington 




LANG'S CAFETERIA 

623-625 Madison Ave. 
Covington 



TO 





Walton Perpetual Bldg. & Loan Assn. 



DIXIE STATE BANK BLDG. WALTON, KT. 

E. S. Wert, See'y A. M. Edwards, 

SEMI-ANNUAL DIVIDEND8 



Courtesy and Co-operation 

Ha* enabled as to become tneresstngly valuable to the 
Public upon whose patronage we depend. 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 

Member of Federal -Deposit Insurance Corporation. 



COLONIAL 

COAL & SUPPLY COMPANY 

47 DIXIE HIGHWAY ERLANGER, KY. 

call DIXIE 7720 for 

Wayne Feeds — Red Jacket Coal 

Concrete Blocks — Ready Mixed Concrete 



PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



Deposits Insured Under the Federal 
Deposit lusurance Corporation . . . 



PUBLIC SALE 

I have decided to quit farming and will sell to the 
high bidder on Bracht & Piner Road, one mile east 
of Bracht, known as the Curley Mullins farm, on 

SAT., JAN. 22 nd 

AT 10:00 A. M., (CWT) 

LIVESTOCK 

Team of extra good Work Horses, 5 & 6 years old, 
weight 1400 lb.; one 9-year old Gray Horse; seven 
good Milk Cows; 8 Heifers and one Guernsey Bull. 

TOOLS 

One Wagon; Mowing Machine; Hay Rake; Disk 
Harrow; Land Plow; Hill Side Plow; Rastus Plow; 
Laying Off Plow; 2 Coke Stoves; Wood Heater; 
four 10-gal. Milk Cans. 

FURNITURE 
Kitchen Cabinet; Davinett; Stand Table; Oil Stove 
with built-in oven; Ice Box; Liberty Heatrola; 
some Small Tools of all kinds and other things too 
numerous to mention. 

TERMS— CASH 
LUNCH WILL BE SERVED ON GROUND 

ELMER "PEASE" SPAULDING 

OWNER 

H. F. Johnson, Auctioneer — Phone Ind. 6196 

J. B. Doan, Clerk 



BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBSI 



:.7*8ft 



•*%- 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 

(Established in 1914) 

THE KENTON-CAMPBELL COURIER. — Established 1937 

(Consolidated June 1, 1938) 



Entered as Second Class Matter January 1, 1916 
at the Post Office at Walton, Kentucky. 



MRS. J. R. WALLACE and WILLIAM W. JARRELL 
EDITORS and PUBLISHERS 



Foreign Advertising Representative: 

AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 



WTIONAL CDITOW Al_ 
SSOCIATION 



& 




MuXL 



Notices and Cards of Thanks: 
B5 words and less, 50 cents. Over 
B5 words $1.00. 



CONCORD 




Noted Musician On 
Staff of WCKY 



"Love not the world, neither the 
things that are in the world." 

Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Chapman 
and grandson Leo. Webster went 
to Walton Sunday afternoon to 
Visit Mr. and Mrs. O. J. Struve's 
baby, it almost had pneumonia, 
but was some better. 

Opal Beach spent the week-end 
with her college friend at' 
Williamstown, we missed her from 
Sunday School. 

The Y. W. A's. and- Sunbeams 
met at the church Saturday 
afternoon, attendance could have 
been better. 

Mrs. Russell Webster is on .the 
Bick list, we hope she -will soon be 
alright again. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Robinson 
Bpent Friday at Ludlow with their 
daughter and family. 



Mr. Julian Forda and family 
moved Saturday from ■ the Mr. 
Charlie Steetts place to Rabbit 
Hash on Mr. Roy Lutes place. 

The W. M. 8. met with Bertha 
Chapman Wednesday with ten 
members and two visitors present. 
The next .meeting will be with 
Mrs. Maggie*fchapman and daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Vevie Webster in Feb. 
The meeting was enjoyed by all. 
Our new president, Mrs. Laura 
Beach had charge of the program. 

Mrs. Mae Brown still visits the 
Dr. but we are glad she still is 
improving. 

Mr. and Mrs. X3len Webster and 
baby of Falmouth spent the week 
end here with their parents. 

Preaching at Concord Saturday 
afternoon at 2 o'clock, Sunday 
and Sunday night at the regular 
time. A welcome is extended to 
everyone, come! 



OLD TIME SQUARE DANCE 

AT 

KENTON FISHING LAKES 

EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT 



CORN HUSKER'S JAMBOREE ALL GIRL 
BAND WILL PLAY HERE JAN. 22nd 



Theodore Hahn, Jr. 

Latest addition to the pro- 
duction and program direction 
staff of WCKY, Cincinnati, is 
Theodore" Hahn, Jr., accord- 
ing to an announcement by 
L. B. Wilson, station owner. 
Mr. Hahn, who has been asso- 
ciated with musical, direction 
in Cincinnati fpr the past 30 
years, recently completed an 
assignment as assistant to the 
national director of music. In 
that post he toured the nation 
arranging and directing gov- 
ernment-sponsored grand op- 
. era, light opera and theatrical 
productions. 

A member of the Cincinnati 
~"Syrtv£>hony Orchestra at 16, Mr. 
Hani and his family =have 
been recognized as . musical ( 
figures in Cincinnati since the 
turn of the century. Mr. Hahn 
is heard over WCKY from 
1:45 td 2 p. m., each Wednes- 
day and Friday on the pro- 
gram "Did You Know?" which 
gives intimate glimpse;, into 
the lives of famous composers. 



GLENCOE BAPTIST <?HURCH 



Rev. W. T. Dunaway, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m., Al- 
bert Collins, Supt. 

Morning worship at 11 a. m. 

Evening worship at 7:15 p. m. 

Prayer meeting on' Thursday 
at 7:30 p. m. 



THE WEEK IN WPB 



erka ! 





. His is what we've been working for 
all along. This is the year to hit and 
hurt the enemy. This is the time when 
everything you do counts double. If we 
all get together and do all we can, 
we'll be over this hurdle and well on our 
way to complete and crushing victory. 

No question about the men 
in uniform — they'll go "all 
out." But can we count on you 
to back them all the way? ^ J 

Your quota is where you work 
— you've got to buy your War 
Bonds and then buy more, 
until every last loose cent 




y.0u have is fighting. Tough? Of course, 
it's tough — unless it is a sacrifice you're 
simply not doing your share f 

Make the sacrifice now — buy more 
than the extra $100 Bond your country 
counts on you for — winning the war is 
worth any sacrifice you make. Besides, 
. you aren't giving, you're 
lending to A merica ! You'll get 
back every dollar you invest 
in War Bonds, with interest. 
An extra $100 War Bond 
now is the minimum for 
everybody — can't wje count 
on you for more? 



This sticker In your window means you have bought 4th War Loan securities:. 

MM BACK THE ATTACK! 



Sponsored By 



DIXIE STATE BANK 
PEOPLES DEPOSIT BANK 
HEBRON DEPOSIT BANK 
FARMERS BANK 



FLORENCE DEPOSIT BANK 
CITIZENS DEPOSIT BANK 
UNION DEPOSIT BANK 
VERONA BANK 



L_ 



Housewives soon may be able 
to purchase drip coffee makers, 
teakettles and other items made 
of enameled ware. The War Pro- 
duction Board announced last 
week that manufacture^ of 
household, .cooking and hospital 
enameled ware are permitted to 
make three items in addition to 
those they have been manu- 
facturing. ■ • * 

Pre-war model baby carriages, 
strollers, walkers, and pushcarts 
will reappear on the market in. 
about six weeks. This is about the 
length of time it will take manu- 
facturers to make the necessary 
changes from production of war 
models, the only type permitted 
to be made since April, 1943. It is 
hoped that enough material will 
become available throughout the 
coming year to keep production 
high enough to take care of the 
expected 20 percent increase in 
births in 1944. 

This would mean production at 
the capacity of the industry, 
which is between 750,000 and 
800,000 baby carriages and 650,- 
000 strollers, walkers and push- 
carts per year. Greater availabil- 
ity of steel has made possible this 
reversion to pre-war specificat- 
ions. No new labor or facilities 
will be required to produce the 
pre-war model vehicles. 

On the farm front, WPB an- 
nounceed production of wheeled 
tractors was being stepped up. 
Last month 20,000 were made 
against a production of 4,200 in 
December, 1942. This record was 



• • 

WAR BONDS 

Powder Monkey 

On board ship and in the artillery 
their buddies call them "powder 
monkeys." N»t disrespectful, just a 
personal, intimate term between 
friends. Civilians call them gun 
crews. During a battle the crews of 
"powder monkeys" must work like 
trojans bringing the ammunition to 
the guns. 




The gun may fire an anu" aircraft 
.50 calibre shell or a broadside from 
the 16 inch guns of a great battle- 
ship, but in either event the "pow- 
der monkey" must pass millions of 
dollars' worth of ammunition to 
make the gun effective, and your 
savings in War Bonds are necessary 
to supply the financial ammunition 
that provides the shells. 

U. S. Trtasury Dtparlmtnt 



V. S. WAR DEPARTMENT 

CERTIFICATE OF 

AUTHORITY A G 095. 

EXPIRES AUG. 10, 1945. 



USEFUL 
NEEDS 

FOR 
SERVICE 

MEN 

Furlough Bags 
Kit Bags 

Roll Kits, Apron Kits 
Shoe Shine Kits 
Sewing Kits 
Money Belts 
Garrison Caps 
Overseas Caps 
Ties, Belts, Sweaters 
Chevrons, Collar Ensignia 
Shoulder Patches 
Service Ribbons 
Garrison Belts 






* 



ARMY STORE 



508 Madison Avenue 



NEAR 
FIFT 



H Covington 



NEAR. 
FIFTH 



made despite the fact a number 
of component parts are used in 
landing crafts as well as tractors. 

You will not need to turn in 
your old tube when purchasing 
tooth paste or shaving cream after 
March 1st. This does not mean 
that old tubes are no longer want- 
ed. The War Production Board is 
urging purchasers to turn in their 
old tubes voluntarily. Tin salvag- 
ed from old tubes has been 
dwindling in quantity since the 
tin content has been constantly 
reduced, therefore the need for 
the tubes is not as urgent as it 
was for the pre-war tubes. 

On the production front, work- 
ers set a new schedule-breaking 
record for the production of heav,y, 
four-engine bombers during Dec. 
Despite the Christmas holidays, 
8,802 war planes were delivered — 
an average of 339 planes every 
working day. 



ON KENTUCKY FARMS 



John and James Vansant, 4-H 
club boys in Elliott county, cleared 
approximately $71 in one month 
on their flock of 112 White Rocks. 

More than 100 new ponds were 




To the People 

of this Community 

YOU ARE IMPORTANT 

There is no such thing as a 
"little" investment in the Fourth 
War Loan. 

Your $25 or $50 or $100 Extra 
War Bond may not have great 
f importance 
in your mind 
in making up 
a 5% billion 
dollar total 
far individu- 
flls 

But multi- 
ply yourself 
by 130,000.000 
and then you 
see in real perspective how truly 
great each citizen becomes in 
massing national strength 
against the Nazis and the Japs. 
Capt. Maurice Witherspoon, 
Navy chaplain aboard the Car- 
rier Wasp when she sank, tells 
of a rescued wounded sailor, 
who, as he regained conscious- 
ness, asked: "Did I do my 
best?" 

That's the only question you, 
too, have to ask yourself when 
you decide the extent of your 

§ersonal participation in the 
ourth War Loan. 
There undoubtedly will be 
large single purchases of War 
Bonds in this community, but 
yours— if it is "your best" will 
deserve equally the red, white 
and blue shield you are privi- 
leged to display in the window 
of your home. 
So "Lefs All Back the Attack." 
THE EDITOR. 



constructed in Mercer county last 
fall. 

Three hundred lockers have 
been rented in the frozen food 
bank soon to be built in Pendleton 
county. 

A 4-H club window display in 
Leslie county contained 116 differ- 
ent items that had been produced 
in gardens or on home farms of 
members. 

More than 8,000 acres were 
planted to hybrid corn in Pulaski 
county last year. 

Ward Chumley of Bell county 
has a flock of 130 White Leghorns 
now laying around 95 eggs a day, 
or better than 70 percent pro- 
duction. « 

Garrard county 4-H club calf 
members have 65 choice baby 
beeves on feed for the annual fat 
cattle show at Louisville next fall. 

It is said that tobacco stalks in 
Ballard county, if properly used, 
would be worth $40,000 to far- 
mers as fertilizer. 

Charles Gray, 4-H'er in Cum- 
berland county, grew 804 pounds 
of tobacco to the acre. 

Some of the Haldeman 4-H club 
members in Rowan county, made 
Christmas money by making and 
selling Christmas wreathes. 

r 

Carlisle county farmers have a 
tobacco allotment of only 110 



acres, but averages of $400 to $900 
per acre have been reported. 

Mercer county farmers sold 
much of their livestock last fall 
because of the drouth and the 
feed situation. 



1/04* Mutt Jfaue 

Vitamins A and D 

You must have Vitamin A 
as an aid in protection against 
infections which are more 
likely to occur in the nose, 
throat, eyes, ears and sinuses; 
when there is a deficiency of 
this vitamin. 

You need Vitamin D to help 
the body make proper use of 
the calcium and phosphorus in 
your diet. 

If you are not getting 
enough of these two important 
vitamins, take a ONE-A-DAY 
brand Vitamin A and D Tab- 
let every day and insure your 
normal requirements. 

ONEk DAY 



'■■ 



4&* 



USED CARS-20 EAST FOURTH ST. 

Covington COlonial 38G4 

1937 Ford Coach „ $295 

1937 DeS?l> Sadsn ,..„ ..,...„,..■ ...^ $375 

1940 DeSota Sedan, 7-passenger $1250 

1937 (Two) Studebaker Coupes $350 

1937 Oldsmobile Coach ™ ! $375 

!937 Dodge Coach __. $350 

1936 Cadillac I $325 

1939 Hudson 4-door 1 .. $695 

1937 Ford Coupe , - x ,._.-—. ~.~. . $295 

1937 Chrysler Sedan „ $295 

1939 Dodge 4-door Sedan ^ $695 

1936 Packard Sedan '___ $275 

1937 Packard Coupe $345 

1936 Chevrolet Sedan .... $245 

1938 Willys Sedan $325 

65 MORE FROM $60 UP 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 



HAVING SOLD MY FARM AND RETIRED FROM FARMING, 
-+AM MOVING TO THE CITY AND WILL SELL TO THE HIGH 
BIDDER, MIDWAY BETWEEN BRACHT & PINER ON ROUTE 
14, ON 

SAT,, JAN. 

AT 10:00 P. M„ (E. W. T.) 

STOCK 
6 year old mare and 6 year old horse, good workers; 6 year old Jersey 
cow, will be fresh by day of sale, 4 years old; Jersey cow, will be fresh 
in February, 6 yrs. old; Jersey cow, milking good; 2 ten month old 
Heifers; 1 O. I. C. Sow; 19 O. I. C. Shoats, weight 40 to 80 lbs.; 70 
Rhode Island Red Pullets, laying; 100 White Leghorn Hens, laying. 

TOOLS 
Double set work harness; 1 sled; good mowing machine; hay rake; 
disk harrow; land plow; hill side plow; laying off plow; 1 -horse 
cultivator; 1 -horse corn drill; 110 tobacco sticks; some corn & hay; 
many small tools too numerous to mention and 2-3 shovel plows. 

FURNITURE 
White Table Top Oil Range, insulated oven, almost new; 3 Burner 
Cabinet Oil Stove, all white with oven; 2 Burner Oil Stove and Oven; 
large Sunbeam Heatrola; Wood Heater; 1 Coal Heater; 1 Coal Range, 
Gray & Ivory; 1 Portable Oil Heater; Library Table; Stand Table; 
Dining Table; Buffet; Cabinet Radio; Music Cabinet; three quarter 
Bed, complete; full size Bed; Day Bed and Pad; 2 Dressers, While 
Kitchen Cabinet; Table & 4 Chairs; Linoleum; Dishes; Fruit Jars and 
numerous small items. 

1936 Plymouth Sedan, Twin Horns and Good Paint. 

TERMS— CASH 

LUNCH WILL BE SERVED ON GROUNDS 

FRANK W. JOHNSON 



OWNER 
HARRY F. JOHNSON, Auct., Phone Ind. 6196 



J. B. DOAN, Clerk 






BH9H 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



i 



SOCIAL aw 
PERSONAL 



Mr. and Mrs. John L. Vest en- 
tertained with dinner at Stephen's 
Restaurant, Friday evening for 
Mr. and Mrs. Rod P. Hughes, who 
'tire leaving for Florida. Those 
present beside the honored guests 
were: Mr. and Mrs. Allen Gaines, 
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Gaines, Mrs. 
Julia A. Rouse, Miss Georgia 
Rouse, Mr. Walter Vest and the 
host and hostess. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Elliott en- 
tertained Sunday evening of last 
week with dinner for Mr. and Mrs. 
Wallace Grubbs. 

Pvt. Masil Falls of Waco, Texas 
arrived last Thursday for a short 
visit with her brother, James 
Falls and friends in Walton, then 
left to visit relatives in Virginia. 



S$-«9 



Your 

Better have your eyes examined 
— they may be the cause of 
your feeling tired and Irritable. 

Jos. B. Schnippering 

Optometrist and Optician 
(Formerly with F. neper) 

5 Pike Street, Covlnftaa 
Phone HElock 0700 



Sgt. Edward R. Dearing, son of 
Rev. and Mrs. C. G. Dearing, and 
who is stationed at Camp Walters, 
Texas arrived home Saturday to 
spend his 15-day furlough with 
his parents and sisters of N. Main 
Street. 

Lt. Martha Wilson of De-Moines 
Iowa was the guest of Mrs. Olive 
Johnson and family Wednesday 
Night. She left Thursday for her 
home in Sparta, Ky. for a few 
days visit with her parents and 
friends. 

Asa M. Rouse, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. W. O. Rouse, has been pro- 
moted from District Manager of 
the New York Telephone Co. at 
Buffalo, N. Y. to Division Com- 
mercial Supervision of the East- 
ern Division of the same Company 
and will be located at the com- 
panies Headquarte: 
New York. 

Mr. Dolpha Sebree and son, 
Ronnie J. of Florence, Ky. called 
on Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Jockey of 
North Main Street last Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Semones 
who recently sold their home in 
Verona are now living in their new 
home in North Walton, purchased 
from Mr. and Mrs. Jprm Cain. We 
are pleased to welcome these fine 
people to our community. Mr. and 
Mrs. Cain have moved about seven 
miles north of Walton on High- 
way No. 25. 



-:■» — .- 



TARPAULINS 

After Selling Your Tobacco, Stop and See Our 

Line of Tarpaulins 

All Sizes — Prices Reasonable 

— WE ALSO DO REPAIR WORK — 

COVINGTON AWNING & ROOFING CO. 

Vi Square South of Kenton Loose Leaf Warehouse 

301 Scott St. COVINGTON Hlland 1735 



Mr. and Mrs. Nich Welsh of 
South Walton entertained Sun- 
day with a family dinner in honor 
ol Corporal Nicholas Welsh who 
was returning Tuesday to Kelly 
Field, Texas where he is stationed. 
Sunday was also the 81 birthday 
of Mrs. Welsh's father, Mr. James 
Bolington, other guests were: Mr. 
and Mrs. Elzie Bolington and two 

I daughters, Mrs. Jack • Nie, Mrs. 

j Rose May Hinkle and son Billie of 
Cincinnati, Ohio, Mr. and Mrs. 
James Moss Bolington and daugh- 
ter, Betty Jane, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lawrence Kendall of Campbells- 
burg. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Jockey called 
on their daughter, Mrs. Wm. T. 
Northcutt of Erlanger, Ky. Sun- 
day afternoon. 

Mrs. William Campbell and 
sister, Miss Libb Ingram were 
called to Newport Tuesday on 
account of the death of Mrs. Mary 
Steffen, a relative. 

Mrs. Bertha Brooks of Cincin- 
nati returned to her home Monday 
after spending the week-end with 
her sister, Mrs. Hugh Semones 
and Mr Semones of North Walton. 

Rev. and Mrs. R. P. DeMoisey 
and family are moving this week 
to the home owned by Frank De- 
Moisey on North Main St. 

Attorney and Mrs A. F. Childers 
or -Plkeville, Kyr who" have pur- 
chased the Rev. DeMoisey home 
in South Walton expect to move 
to this property soon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rod Hughes left 
Tuesday for Tampa, Florida where 
they will spend several months. 

Mrs. John Paris of Lexington 
was the week-end guest of Mrs. 
Sallie Day and Mr. ands Mrs. 
Lawrence Mudden and family. 

Miss Helen Mann of Cincinnati 
is visiting her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Clifford Mann. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. P. Mann enter- 
tained Mr. and Mrs. Raymond 
Benson and family of Forest Hills, 
and Jean Pennington Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Johnson and 
daughters entertained Mr. and 
Mrs. Jimmy Vessells and family 
over the week-end. 

Mr. John Silz and Mrs . Clara 
Fey were Sunday guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Louis Schwab and 
daughters. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Worthing- 
ton and Pat visited his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Worthington 
of Sherman Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. O. Hudson of 
Verona are spending some time in 
Hot Springs, Arkansas. 



[ Mr. James W. Stephenson is in 
St. Elizabeth Hospital for an 
operation on his eyes, having a 
cataract removed. 

Mr. A. E. Stephens, Editor and 
Publisher of The Boone County 
Recorder at Burlington was a 
business visitor in Walton Friday 
afternoon and while here called 
at the Advertisef'Office. 

Mrs. Lula Vest and Mrs. Kate 
Noell returned to their home in 
South Walton Thursday evening 
after visiting with their sisters, 
Mrs. Ida Beach and Mrs Lawrence 
Menefee and Mr. Menefee in 
Crittenden for two and a half 
weeks. 

Miss Libb Ingram spent Sunday 
with her brother, Steve Ingram 
and family in Covington. 

Mrs. Zayda Clore and mother, 
Mrs. Edith Rouse were the Sun- 
day dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Willis Berkshire of So. Main St. 

Mrs. Rich Glenn and son were 
the Sunday guests of her mother, 
Mrs. Agnes Mullins and her grand 
father, Mr. Peoples of Bracht. 

Mr. Edward Torbert of South 
Ft. Mitchell and Miss Olive Soden 
of Newport, Ky. were week-end 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. William 
Jarrell and daughter. 



SUGAR CREEK 




HE'S BACK ! 



He's done his part and 
more — have you ? 

They're coming back — the gallant men who've 
been wounded in action. 

Tell them the war's as good as won and that 
there's no need to buy more War Bonds. 

They know first-hand what invasion costs ic 
blood and lives and money. They know the 
real fight's just begun . . . that wishful thinking 
can prolong the war and waste thousands of 
lives needlessly. 

They're looking to us to keep on backing the 
attack... to help get it over sooner by pro- 
Tiding die overwhelming weight of arms it 
to win. ~ 



Mr. and Mrs. John Clifton, son 
and daughters entertained as 
their Sunday guest, Mr. and Mrs. 
Bert Layne of Latonia, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harvey Fox, (better- known 
as "Curley Fox and Texas Ruby" 
of WLW) Cincinnati, Mrs. Helen 
Shelton and Miss Faye Miskell of 
Glencoe. 

- Mrs. Eliza Walltck - and " Mrs. 
Donnie Radford were business 
visitors in Warsaw Saturday. 

Mrs. Lillian Oldendick of Cin 
cinnati spent Sunday with her 
parents, . Mr. and Mrs. William 
Beach. 

We are sorry to report Mr. 
Albert Noel is on .the sick list this 
week. 

Mrs. Faye Price and Mrs. Chris- 
tine Sullivan of Warsaw spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs Leonard 
Shelton. 

Mrs. Henry Ellis-and son Shelby 
of Dry Creek ,called on relatives 
here Saturday. 

Mrs. Helen Shelton and Miss 
Roberta Clifton spent Wednesday 
with Mrs. Myrtle Grizzell of Ft. 
Thomas, Ky. 

Mrs. Grover Clifton called on 
Miss Myrtle Edwards Sunday 
afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Al Smothers and 
Mr. and Mrs. Van Spencer of 
Cincinnati, Mr. and Mrs. Clinton 
Stewart and Mrs. Abbie Stewart 
of Rising Sun, Indiana spent Sun- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. Albert 
Noel. Mrs. Abbie Stewart remain- 
ed here to help care for her father, 



COMMISSIONER'S SALE 



Want a 
New Career? 



You can very likely find 
just the chance you're looking 
for— in the WAC. 

If you haven't a skill, Army 
experts will teach you. Perhaps 
you'd like to drive a jeep, 
work a teletype machine, or 
help direct airplane traffic. 

Whatever you do, you will 
get valuable training — learn 
' interesting- things — and help 
get this war won! 

TODAY— get full details at 
the nearest U. S. Army Re- 
cruiting Station (your local 
post office will give you the 
address). Or write to: The 
Adjustant General, Room 
4415, Munition 8 Building, 
Washington, D. C. 



We can't match their sacrifice but we can show 
them we're in die fight by buying extra Wax 
Bonds daring the Fourth War Loan. 

Buy at least one extra $100 dollar bond now . . I 
and keep on buying Bonds until Victory. 



*>&■ 



This sticker in your 
window shows you 
bought extra War 
Bonds during the 
Fourth War Loan. 
It's your battle flag 
here at home. 



WE BOUGHT FXIRA WAR BONDS 




1^-AB BACK THE ATTACK! 



This Advertisement Sponsored as a Contribution to Victory by 

COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 



Commonwealth of ..Kentucky, 
Boone Circuit Court, 

C. C. Uopperton, et al., Plaintiff 

Versus:- Notice of Sale 

Callie Hoperton Beach et al., 
Defendant. 

By virtue of a judgement and 
order of sale of the Boone Circuit 
Court rendered at the December 
Term thereof 1943, in the above 
cause, I shall proceed to offer for 
sale on the premises in Walton, 
Kentucky to the highest bidder, at 
public auction on Monday, the 7th 
day of February 1944 at 1:00 
O'clock" P. M. (Central War Time) 
or thereabout (being the 1st day 
of the February Term of County 
Court), upon a credit of 6 and 12 
months, the following described 
property to- wit: 

Parcel No. 1 A house and lot in 
Walton, Boone County, Kentucky, 
situated on the west side of the 
Covington & Lexington Turnpike 
road and bounded and described 
as follows: Beginning at a st^ke 
132 feet from a gate post which 
is on the line between William 
Gillman's Line and Arnold's pro- 
perty running on a line with the 
edge of the Lexington and-Xtov- 
ington Turnpike S 29 '4 E 66 feet 
to a stake, corner with W. H. 
Stamler's lot; thence with Stam- 
ler's line S 60% W 229 feet pass- 
ing a 25 foot street at 160 x 185 
respectively to a stake 3JJ feet 
from the center of the L & N 
Railway; thence North* 3% W 72 
feet to a stake; thence North 60% 
E 399 feet passing a 25 foot street 
at 214 arid 239 feet respectively 
to the beginning. Being the same 
property conveyed to Margaret 
(Maggie) Hopperton by Mattie V. 
Doubman, by deed dated August 
12, 1915, recorded in Deed Book 57 
page 60 of the Boone County Ret- 
cords, at Burlington, Ky. 

Parcel No. 2 A certain tract or 
parcel of land, lying and being in 
Boone County Kentucky, west of 
and adjoining the twon of Walton, 
and bounded thus; Beginning at 
a stone in a line of the right of 
way of the L & N Railroad, a t cor- 
ner with Eli Conrad, thence with 
his lirtfesS. 61 W 12.80 chains to a 
corner with Harvey Roberts; 
thence with his line N 12% W. 
21.65 chains to a stone; thence 
with a line of. a passway N. 77% 
E 30 links to a stone; thence N. 
9'i W. 1089 chains to a corner 
with 26 acre lot set apart to 
Annie Glenn; thence with a line 
of said lot N 75% E 23.54 chains 
to a stone in a line of the afore- 
said railroad; thence with' the 
line of the right of way of said 
railroad S 3 19-26 . . . 5.59 chains; 
S 1 E 2.57 chains, S 2 W 3.39 
chains, S 10 W 4.47 chains, S 14% 
W 4.24 chains, S 18 W 3.28 chains, 
S 21% W 3.59 chains, S 23% W 
2.03 chains to the beginning, con- 
taining 62.16 acres, more or less. 
Also a strip of land 60 feet wide 
on the west side of the L & N Ry. 
Co., right of way, running with 
said right of way to a street and 
being the rear portion of a lot 
conveyed by the grantor, Robert 
Brown, to Lula Jones, which was 
reserved by said Brown as an 
Outlet. Being the same property 
conveyed to Maggie Hopperton by 
Julia E. West, by deed dated Jan- 
uary 1st, 1916, and recorded in 
Deed Book 57, page 317 of the 
aforesaid records. 

For the purchase price, the 
purchaser must execute bond, 
with approved surety, bearing 
legal interest from the day of 
sale, until paid, and having the 
force and effect of a judgement. 
Bidders will be prepared to comply 
promptly with these terms. 

A. D. YELTON, 

Master Commissioner Boone 
Circuit Court 



\ !V l >^*^^ / lt^*^^U^^ v ^tf^^ m '^t>^* « ' / li^^'^U^'^^U^^ 



J. L HAMILTON & SON 

ji '■$ 

FUNERAL SERVICE ' 

VERONA -i- KENTUCKY 



NICHOLSON 



"Be "not weary in well doing." 
"Faitji is the key that unlocks the 
door of God's hidden riches". The 
Master who notes the fall of the 
sparrow will guard His children 
well. True Christians who live 
near to Him are close to the fire. 

Througrj the kindness of Allen 
Butler, we received a lovely 
Christmas basket from Rev. and 
Mrs. R. F. DeMoisey, for which 
grateful appreciation is extended. 
It contained oranges, bananas, 
tangerines, apples, candy, nuts 
and a large Hershey bar with 
almonds. . ^ 

Mosf highly commended was 
the kind thoughtfulness of Mr. 
and Mrs. Woodrow Butler In 
generously donating one hundred 
and sixty boxes of candy to the 
Hickory Grove Sunday School for 
their Christmas Tree. 

As roses have been scattered in 
many lives by Mrs. J. H. Ander- 
son, may there be yielded back to 
her a perpetual fragrance. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Rankin en- 
tertained on Christmas Day with 
an elegant turkey dinner. The 
honored guests were: Lieut, and 
Mrs. Bryson Fish. 

Heartiest thanks are extended 
to Mrs. Jasper N. Williams for 
another lovely box of canned 
peaches, pears, and tomatoe juice. 

A number of relatives enjoyed 
a lovely turkey dinner at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Fisk and 
daughters, little Misses Nellie and 
Janet on Christmas Day. 

Little Miss Patricia Williams 
has sufficiently recovered from 
her severe illness to return to her 
home from the hospital. 

Most heartily do we thank Mr. 
Victor Webster for recent kind- 
ness. 

Deeply appreciated were love- 
ly gifts from the following friends 
during the holiday season, and we 
sincerely trust that the year which 
lies ahead for them will be filled 
with spiritual blessings, and the 
happiness that comes from a close 
fellowship with God, and for every 
kindness and manefestation of 
Christian love^We heartily thank: 
Rev. W. T. GaVdner, Rev. and Mrs 
R. F. DeMoisey, Mrs. J. H. Ander- 
son, Mrs. Helen Connell, Mrs. 
Jasper N. Williams, Mr. and Mrs. 
Cecil Northcutt and Bobby, Mr. 
and Mrs. Earl Hanna, Florida 
relatives. 



VERONA 



Word received from Mr. and 
Mrs. D. O. Hudson states they are 
enjoying their stay in Hot Springs. 
Ark. 

Mr. and Mrs Haltorf and family 
of Winchester have moved to the 
Raymond Hull farm. 

The W. M. S. met at the church 
last Wednesday for their regular 
meeting. 

Most of the tobacco has been 
taken to the markets from this 
community. 

Mrs. O. K. Powers is spending 
a few days at her home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lefty Shelter, Mr. 
and Mrs. Charlie Steele- and 
daughter Reta Roberts spent Sun- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. J. T. 
Roberts. 



Real Estate News 






D. R. Chapman of Verona pur- 
chased the Helen G. Mitchell farm 
on Verona Road. This sale was 
made by A. C. Johnson. 




Your Valentine Photo 

Keep your image close to him 
in the lonely hours on" a far- 
away front — send yoii:- smiling 
Valentine Photograph, made in 
our modern studio. Come in 
today. 

SERVICE PHOTO 
STUDIO 

804 Madison Ave., Covington 

STUDIO HOURS: 

11 A. M. to 9 P. M. Daily 

Sundays, 1 to 5 P. M. 



MT. ZION 




IHCOHrOBATID 



'V* Is For 
Vision 

Everybody has a part in the 
drive for VICTORY. Good eye- 
sight is of vital importance. Eye 
strain and defective vision keeps 
a person below normal, when lt 
is his or her patriotic duty to feel 
as well and strong as possible. 

Come in today and have your 
eyes examined. 

FRANK RIGGS 

Optometrist 
Pike & Russell Covington, Ky. 



A. C. Gross attended the Farm 
Bureau State Convention at 
Louisville part of last week. 

Early Tomlin has returned 
home after being in Christ Hos- 
pital for several weeks. 

Frank Alexander of Illinois is 
visiting Mr. and Mrs. Marion 
Blair and other relatives here. 

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Gordon were: Rev. and Mrs. 
L. N. Stamper, Mrs. Mary Beach, 
Mrs. Mary Lawrence and Brian 
Dallas. 

Elmer Ferrell of Sidney, Ohio 
attended the funeral of his 
brother-in-law, Estil Bingham and 
visited Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Ferrell. 

John Lawrence spent the week- 
end with Harry and Edward 
Anderson. . ' 

Mrs. Alice Franks passed away 
at the Good Samaritan Hospital 
in Cincinnati Saturday morning. 
She was brought to the home of 
her son, W. C. Franks Sunday. 
Funeral services were held at Mt. 
Zion Church Monday afternoon 
by Rev. L. N. Stamper. She leaves 
to mourn her passing five child- 
ren. Ellis of Chicago, Lucille and 
Edgar of Covington and Barnett 
and Conyers of this place and a 
host of other relatives and friends. 
Sympathy is extended to the en- 
tire family. 



PUBLIC SALE 

Having sold may farm and giving all my time to my 
trucking business, I will sell to the high bidder on 
Paxton Road, 1 1 / 2 miles South of Fiskburg and one 
mile off of Route 17 or 3 L Highway, known as 
the Homer Oliver Farm, on 

FRIDAY, JUL- 28 th 

AT 10:00 P. M., (CYVT) 

LOOK FOR SIGN 
Team of extra good work horses, weight about 
1500 lbs. each, 10-11 years old, this team matches; 
one bay horse, 13 years old; one gray horse, 8 yrs. 
old — good workers; 11 head of extra good milk 
cows, most all are fresh, Holstein and Jersey; 1-18 
month old Holstein Bull; 1 good wagon, box and 
hay bed; 2 mowing machines; hay rake; disk 
harrow; 2-horse jumper; lay off plow; 7-shovel 
plow; 2 shovel plow; 4 land plows; pitch forks; 
sled; hoes; shovels and all kinds of small tools; 
some hay, alfalfa & timothy; iron kittle; 2 five and 
5 ten gallon milk cans; 1 good ice box; davenport; 
dresser; bed springs and bed and some other house- 
hold furniture and other things t<w numerous to 
mention. 

TERMS— CASH 
LUNCH WILL BE SERVED ON GROUNDS 

MALCOLM OLIVER 

OWNER 

Harry Johnson, Auctioneer — Phone Ind. 6196 
J. B. Doan, Clerk 



■~2> 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



UncUPkilQi 

Say 5: ^^|| 

Intervals of not working are nec- 
essary for the well-being of any 
man. 

Those good old days were the 
days we did not have much — and 
didn't want much. 



Golf does decrease a man's 
weight— but it also increases his 
conceit. 

Viewing some of the loud pajamas 
received as Christmas presents, we pre- 
dict insomnia is in for an increase. 

Unlike a woman, no man will 
stand pain because of his clothing, 
but he will stand discomfort. 



NONE 




St.Joseph 

AS F»l Ft I r\l 

World s Largest Seller at 10' 



Chrysanthemum for Musso 
When Hirohito conferred the Su- 
preme Order of the Chrysanthe- 
mum upon Mussolini last summer, 
the name of the decoration was 
omitted in the Italian press and in 
news releases to other countries 
because, in Italy, the chrysanthe- 
mum is symbolic of death. •, 



GROVE'S 
COLD TABLETS 

A Real Medicine 



Grore's Cold Tablets are prompt la 
action— decisive In results. They're 
a multiple medicine — an Internal 
medicine. Go to work In a business- 
like way to work on all theee usual 
cold symptoms at the same time. 
Relieve headache — ease body aches- 
reduce fever— relieve nasal stuffiness. 
Grove's Cold Tablets ftive wonderful 
comfort! Take exactly as directed. 
Rest, avoid exposure. Ask your drug- 
gist for Grove's Cold Tablets. 

Save Money— Get Large Economy SUe 



'OR FIFTY YEARS 
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„>a*J2*i 



Thursday, January 20, 194'* 



CHAPTER I 

Even those names that meant so 
much have vanished now, so that 
you will look in vain for Ox Bow or 
Dripping Spring or the valley of the 
Little Comanche on any recent map. 
And it is hard to believe that this 
land, where flashing beacons now 
guide the roaring course of planes 
by night; and by day motorcars dart 
effortlessly across its endless miles, 
was then but a wild and rolling 
prairie of buffalo grass, and a jour- 
ney of any length had no certain 
ending, and all of a restless nation 
seemed to be following the sun in a 
mad race set off by the cry. "G° 
West, young man; go Westl"— -not 
sixty years ago. 

This was a time of new and un- 
believable happenings. Pullman's 
Golden Palace cars were running 
clear to the Pacific, with- their ted 
velvet curtained windows, their gas 
lamps that made the coaches 'as 
brilliant as a ladies' drawing room 
and their' sleeping compartments in 
which many women still refused to 
undress when going to bed at night 
Three thousand Negroes were 
marching afoot from Alabama, with 
their women and children and half- 
starved dogs, to claim thetfforty. 



Valuable Attar 

Attar of roses, a perfume base, 
la so valuable to the rose oil indus- 
try of Bulgaria it is deposited in 
banks. 



RHEUMATIC PAIN 

■Md art Spoil vsur Div— tit sflsr It is* 

Don't put off getting- C-2223 to re- 
lieve pain of muscular rheumatism 
and other rheumatic pains. Caution : 
Use only as directed. First bottle 
purchase price back if not satisfied. 
90o and 11.00. Today, buy C-2228. 



FALSE TEETH 

AND A d$^\ 

GRAND SMILE! . 



YOU CAN LAUGH, TALK 
AND EAT, FREE OF P1ATE 
EMBARRASSMENT 

It's so easy to enjoy all-day confidence 
when your plates are held firmly and safely 
in place by this "comfort-cushion" — a 
dentist's formula. 

I. Dr. Wernet's Fow- 2. Recommended by 

der lets you enjoy dentists for SO years. 

solid foods, avoid em- 3. Economical; small 

barrasament of loose amount lasts longer, 

plates. Helps prevent 4. Pure and harmless 

sore gums. —pleasant tasting. 

All orvoortr.— 30<. Money bock if not delighted 



m Dr. Wernet's Powder 

LARGEST SELLING PLATE 
POWDER IN THE WORLD 



which the state of Kansas promised 
Boxcar emigrant trains rolled out 
of the East one upon another, spew- 
ing settlers along the way, and the 
high-topped ' Pittsburg wagons lum- 
bered West behind their ox teams, 
to meet— not a barren prairie — but 
the red swarms Of Texas longhorns 
coming up from the South. 

For this was a time when the man 
in the saddle was king of the plains 
and prairie; all others were hoe- 
men, beneath him, to be swept aside 
by the relentless march of his trail 
herds. Ten million Texas longftorns 
that had run wild since'the Rebel- 
lion were finding a market in the 
shipping towns of the new railroads; 
a thousand cattle ranches were be- 
ing made in the new lands of Mon- 
tana and Wyoming? where cattle 
had never been before. Up that 
trail, twelve hundred miles long, un- 
checked by storm or drouth, by rov- 
ing bands of Comanches or the 
barbed wire of the hoe-men, the 
great flood poured northward, a mil- 
lion head in a single year. 

This was a time of a young man's 
opportunity. Whatever a man was 
going to be depended only upon him- 
self. 



ready for bed. He had turned into 
the dark toward his unrolled blan- 
kets when something sailed past 
him and fell with a soft thud. 

He stooped and pushed the un- 
burned ends of cottonwood together 
and crouched there, waiting. It was 
not until 'the little flame leaped up, 
shedding a wide circle of light, that 
a figure stepped from the shadows. 
Even then he didn't move. He sat 
wholly still, watching Willy Nickle, 
feeling as he always did that this 
was a ghost shape from out of a far- 
off past. 

He came forward silently on deer- 
skin moccasins with high tops laced 
halfway to his knees, a small, thin, 
fragile-looking man, ageless. Long 
chestnut hair brushed his shoulders, 
but his cheeks and. ,chin were shaved 
clean. His face wa"s very dark, yet 
oddly smooth and as gentle as a 
child's except for the sharp, quick 
brightness of its small gray eyes. 

"How are you, Willy?" Lew said 
and got no answer. His only greet- 
ing was a nod as the old man came 
from the shadows with an ancient 
needle gun cuddled like a baby 
across his thin chest 

Always it was not until three deep 
puffs of kjnnikinnick hit old Willy**? 
brain witji their terrific force that 



acres of land and the span of." hules talk seemed jolted out of him. Even 

— UI..L. ai IaIIJ -mv-1--- __?__?• i "'iIimi t* n . n * . :i-j A«iiIT* m ~i-i_ 



then it was veiled talk of "his own 
strange kind. Sftu never learned 
anything from Wffly Nickle by blunt- 
ly asking questions. 

He took his three puffs, and lifted 
his head and looked sharply all 
around him. 

"Well!" he said suddenly. "It 
has been some. I do say!" His 
squinted gray eyes came back. 

Lew nodded. "A year now come 
calf time," he said. "A year in 



beaver this old coon never did cot- 
ton to, Clay Manning. And that 
Steve young 'un of Tom Arnold's, 
was J4 him night ridin' up Crazy 
Woman Creek not two hours after 
the bank was robbed? Him and four 
strangers here? Seems like I was 
camped on Crflzg Woman then." 

Lew stared at him. "The bank in 
Ox Bow?" 

Willy nodded. "But was a man to 
hunt some trouble now he'd see why 
so many Cross T horses go loose- 
herded up Crazy Woman. That 
would be at nighttime, early." 

"Tonight?" 

"No, already made it. Was some 
gunshot late this afternoon which 
must have hurried 'em. If it was 
this nigger tomorrow going down 
the valley he'd keep to the east side. 
That's talk, though. Maybe some 
sort wouldn't listen." 

"Maybe he wouldn't," Lew agreed 
and smiled. "Maybe he'd like to 
know." 

"He'll find tracks then," Willy of- 
fered. "They're plain enough. But 
was it me I'd have old Silverbell 
here ready." He stroked the slender 
barrel of his needle gun. 

Through a little silent time, while 
Willy Nickle's head drooped and he 
seemed to doze, Lew sorted out the 
old man's information. 

He felt a grimly troubled mean- 
ing in that none of these things had 
been in Tom Arnold's letter. The 
bank in Ox Bow belonged to Arnold; 



TO YOUR 




i, DR. JAMES W. BARTON 



Released by Western Newspaper Union. 

GLAUCOMA 




Barton 



You have been reading much late- 
ly about trachoma, that disease of 
lining of eyelids and how the sulfa 
drugs have been able to cure many 
cases in a ii&bdrt 
time, thus avoiding 
the prolonged and 
painful treatment of 
former years. 

However, another 
disease of the eye- 
glaucoma — is re- 
sponsible for many 
cases of total and 
partial loss of eye- 
sight. Glaucoma is 
increased tension 
within the eyeball 
causing it to bulge 
outward. An early symptom is the 
appearance of colored rings around 
distant lights at night. The pupil 
is usually dilated. Pain occurs and 
is often very severe, being frequent- 
ly mistaken for neuralgia. 

Glaucoma is caused by obstruc- 
tion of the flow outward of the fluid 
at back of eyeball. If not treated 
early enough and by proper meth- 
ods glaucoma finally causes com- 
plete and hopeless blindness, usu- 
ally with a period of great pain. 

The responsibility for this loss of 
eyesight rests to some extent on 
physicians and on the patients them- 
selves. The task of the general 
practitioner is threefold: To discover 
the presence of glaucoma among his 
patients, to refer them to eye clinics 
or eye specialists and to co-operate 
with the eye specialist by furnishing 
him with full information concern- 



ON THE 

HOME FROM 

RUTH WYETH ^PEAR^!g ^6) 




its robbery, he knew, could be pret- ^S the general health of the pa- 
ty bad. What puzzled him, wholly tlents. 



SNAPPY FACTS 




ABOUT 



RUBBER 



The peak of tropical Ameri- 
can rubber production, in- 
cluding guayule, was in 1912, 
when about 62,000 tons war* 
produced in all countries. In 
1940 the world's production 
of rubber was 1,389,695 tons, 
more than came out of the 
Amazon Valley in all the 
years from 1837 to 1939 in- 
clusive. 

By the use of bud-grafted trees, 
the yield of rubber on Far East 
plantations In soma cases has been 
Increased from 500 to 1,500 pounds 
per acre a year. 

One type of four-motored 
bomber requires more than 
2,000 pounds of rubber; pur- 
suit planes require over 100 
pounds each. 



Ifi^t^xjX^r 



%umcz peace 



REGoodrich 



PIRST IN RUBBER 



*i>l 



In the upper valley of the Little 
Comanche that night only one camp- 
fire pierced the blackness, a small 
one, glowing faintly where high rim- 
rock guarded a narrow entrance 
down from the vast empty reaches 
of the Staked Plain. 

Lew Burnet was cooking supper 
over a cautious blaze. He had laid 
his cottonwood twigs together at the 
ends, Indian fashion, spreading 
them outward like the spokes of a 
wheel. That way they burned with 
no smoke and a small flame, but 
made an intense point of heat be- 
neath his pot of coffee. 

The coffee boiled and he pushed 
the pot back. A comb of antelope 
ribs, already braised, stood propped 
against a rock. A pile of stick bread 
lay at his knee. He tore> the antelope 
ribs apart and fell to eating with the 
hunger of a man who'd had nothing 
since dawn. 

His was a young face, with sober 
strength in its long lines, but 
strangely marked from the tram- 
pling hoofs of an outlaw horse years 
ago. There was left now only a 
curved crease from his right cheek- 
bone to his chin and 'a white cres- 
cent close to the hairline of his fore- 
head. Yet those first years when 
the wounds were raw and ugly had 
left another mark. He had never 
forgotten how the girls turned from 
him, shocked, and he had under- 
stood. 

A sensitive nature protects itself 
in deeply hidden ways, and this ear- 
ly accident had made Lew Burnet, 
more than he realized, a restless 
and lonely man. His work had all 
been man's work, hard and danger- 
ous and single-handed; at twenty- 
five he had bossed three great herds 
of longhorns up the trail from Texas 
to Dodge and Ogallala. Even the 
new ranch he had established in Wy- 
oming this past winter had risen in 
his vision as a place only for him- 
self. 

There had been too little informa- 
tion in Tom Arnold's letter. He 
wanted more, even more, perhaps, 
than Arnold could give. A month 
ago he had mailed a letter of bis 
own south from Wyoming, and late 
this afternoon, before corning down 
off the rimrock, he had stopped long 
enough to kindle a pillar of white 
smoke into the still air. He had 
whipped his rawhide coat across it 
twice, breaking it If old Willy 
Nickle had received the letter "and 
had stayed anywhere within twenty 
miles of the Little Comanche he 
would see that signal and know this 
meeting place. 

But the half-hour passed and the 

night's hushed silence remained un- 

i broken. By the simple process of 

pulling off his coat and boots he was 




Lew stared at him. 
in Ox Bow?" 



'The bank 



Wyoming and they *do say things 
have happened on the Little Co- 
manche since I've been gone." 

"So I guess," said Willy. "This 
nigger wouldn't know." 

He knew all right. There were 
no longer beaver to trap in the great 
South Park of Colorado, nor shaggy 
herds of buffalo to follow north to 
the headwaters of the Yellowstone, 
and the Mexican girls of Taos and 
Santa Fe could not lure old Willy 
any more. 

Lew waited, smoking and feeling 
the kinnikinnick already start to 
spin his head. It often seemed a 
strange thing that he had been 
picked out for one of Willy Nickle's 
few friends. But it was so, a queer, 
loyal, unspoken friendship, which he 
knew he was going to need now 
more than ever. 

"Wyoming," Willy mused across 
the fire. "No place for a man now, 
but didn't me and Bill Evans find 
beaver a heap there that winter? 
I can tell you! A pretty smart lot of 
boys was camped on the Sweetwater 
and the way whisky flowed that time 
was some." 

"Still a good place, Wyoming," 
Lew said and then brought Willy's 
wandering mind back to the Little 
Comanche. They do tell me that 
Tom Arnold is moving his Cross T 
up there. Taking four thousand long- 
horns up the trail this month, all the 
way to the north. And I've a letter 
to trail boss for him. That's the 
proposition. But there's Clay Man- 
ning, Tom's foreman now, who's 
been north once or twice himself 
and could lead this herd maybe. 
Then what am I here for? I don't 
know. Things happen in a country 
when a man's been gone a year." 

"Well, they do!" said Willy. He 
smoked thoughtfully for a moment, 
his thin cheeks making deep hol- 
lows. Then he said, "That's one 



unexplainable, was this business of 
loose horses being run up Crazy 
Woman to the Staked Plain. If it 
was rustling, Arnold or his fore- 
man. Clay Manning, should be more 
on watch than that. The trail drive 
would need every saddle animal the 
Cross T had. And Steve .... 

"Willy," he asked, "you're sure 
it was Steve riding that night of the 
robbery?" 

Old Willy opened one eye. "Cer- 
tain," he said and closed it. 

There was no answer to that. 
Things happen in a year. Even 
twelve months ago, Lew remem- 
bered, Steve's young rebellion had 
turned into violent ways. 

He was coming back, perhaps, 
just in time. For he and Steve had 
grown up together in a close com- 
panionship, more confiding than be- 
tween father and son. Everything 
Tom Arnold had built here in Texas 
was planned around his boy. " Still 
there was that antagonism between 
them, a reckless, high-strung nature 
fighting the strict, unsparing one of 
the man. 

Inevitably Steve brought up his 
sister Joy. Lew bent forward and 
knocked his pipe out against his boot 
toe. Behind all his thinking tonight 
was one question. He asked it now. 
"Willy, when did Tom's girl mar- 
ry Clay Manning?" 

Willy's head lifted. His gray eyes 
Squinted brightly. "Never did. 
There's been none of that on the 
Cross T. Why not, this child couldn't 
•ay. But there's somebody could 
make a better- man for her. Well, 
he could!" 

"No," Lew said. "It's the sleek 
bucks they run to, Willy. You know 
that." 

In a moment when the old man 
stood up to go he knew there was 
no use offering a bed here. Willy 
always slept alone. It might be ten 
miles from Dripping Spring or only 
off a hundred yards; he wouldn't 
know. 

Standing with the ancient needle 
gun cuddled again across his chest, 
Willy took that quick glance all 
around him into the shadows. He 
stepped back. "Raise your smoke," 
he said, "if you've a enind." That 
was his promise and Lew under- 
stood. He'd not stray far from the 
Little Comanche for a while. 

Lew broke camp in the dark next 
morning, saddled while his coffee 
boiled, and in the cold sharp gray of 
daylight he was traveling south. 
This was the end of a month-long 
trail. Even the tall black beneath 
him stepped out with a home-com- 
ing knowledge, and the red mule 
with its white tarpaulin pack trotted 
behind, needing no leash. 

The Little Comanche had changed 
even more, he saw, in his absence 
of a year. Once a man could ride 
down this valley through a waving 
sea of bluestem grass knee-deep on 
a horse. But Tom Arnold, like ev- 
ery cattleman in Texas now, had 
stocked his range beyond its limit in 
this mad race to supply the northern 
demand The bluestem had van- 
ished, never to grow again. There 
was left only the short curly buffalo 
grass — nature's last stand — even 
that showing great dusty patches. 
The Little Comanche could be 
wholly worthless in another fire 
years. 

At, least, he thought, he had 
learned that lesson, and his own 
land in Wyoming came into the drift- 
ing gaze of his eyes.*That was vir- 
gin now as this once had been, a 
sweet-grass country, ten thousand 
acres he had got control of by plas- 
tering his homestead entries over 
every water hole and spring. The 
opportunity was there for a big 
ranch, as big as Arnold's Cross T. 

(TO BE CONTINUED! 



In many cases, even when pa- 
tients know that they have glau- 
coma, they neglect to visit their doc- 
tors or eye clinics and postpone op- 
eration until it is too late." 

Glaucoma usually starts about the 
age of 40 or 50 and partial loss of 
vision begins in one eye, with an 
occasional blur in front of one or 
both eyes and a slight one-sided 
headache. Reading becomes diffi- 
cult and "a few hours spent in play- 
ing cards or at the movies leaves 
him with an uncomfortable feeling 
in his eye and blurred vision." 
• • • 

Dizziness May Mean 
Meniere's Disease 



LJOW to cut a flared dressing 
1 * table skirt without fullness at 
the top, is something worth know- 
ing. You may be making a smart- 
ly tailored affair of white pique 
with pink bindings and buttons, 
like the one shown here ; or an un- 
der lining for a full skirt of trans- 
parent material. 

The diagram shows how to make 
a pattern for half of the skirt. The 
center front may be placed on a 
fold of the goods in cutting if there 
is no front opening. Cut the paper 
by the dimensions in the diagram. 
Mark point A in 14-inches from 
the upper left corner. Measure up 
from the lower right corner a dis- 



tance equaling the length of the 
skirt from A to the left edg'e of the 
paper and mark point C. Connect 
these points with lines drawn, as 
shown. 

e e e 

NOTE— There are three other Interest- 
ing styles of dressing tables with detailed 
directions for making In SEWING Book 1, 
Also slip covers, draw curtains, and nu> 
merous household articles. Copy of BOOK 
1 will be mailed for IS cents. Address: 






MKS. RUTH WYETH SPEARS 

Bedford Hills New York 

Drawer 10 

Enclose IS cents for Book No. 1. 

Name ,,, 

Address 



Ships Go Over Bridge 

A military bridge built recently 
across the Shatt-al-Arab river in 
Iraq "acquired a unique feature 
through ajchange in design which 
had to be naade after construction 
began, says Collier's. Although a 
lift-type drawbridge,, its 92-foot 
span is lowered instead of raised 
so vessels pass over instead of un- 
der it 



Where there is a partial loss of 
hearing, dizziness, ringing in ears, 
nausea and vomiting, it is called 
Meniere's syndrome or group of 
symptoms. 

The fact that many of these cases 
are relieved by blowing open the 
Eustacian tube, others by cutting 
down on table salt, and still others 
by use of certain drugs show that 
there must be various causes for 
this group of symptoms. It also 
shows that patients with these symp- 
toms must not expect relief at once, 
because finding the cause may take 
some time. 

In Archives of Otolaryngology (ear 
and throat diseases). Dr. A. Atkin- 
son, New York, states that there 
are two important reasons for the 
failure of any particular treat- 
ment to give relief. First, failure 
to find the cause — partially closed 
Eustacian tube, too much water in 
ear tissues adjoining the ear; second, 
failing to remember that none of the 
single known causes or the presence 
of more than one of the usual causes 
can explain every case of Meniere's 
disease. Thus there are a very 
large number of cases that will not 
respond to the usual treatment. This 
large number of cases can be divided 
into at least two divisions, each 
with a different cause. Some may 
be caused by allergy (sensitiveness 
to various substances) and others 
(the largest number) may not be 
sensitive to these substances, that is 
they are not allergic. 

In other words, in those who are 
allergic, the blood vessels are more 
widely open than normal, whereas 
in the nonallergic the blood vessels 
are not as widely open as in the nor- 
mal. In the first class there is a 
disturbance of the nerve supplying 
the part and in the second or large, 
class there is a disturbance in the 
structure of the ear due to pressure, 
spasm, hardening of the blood ves- 
sels, and finally to infection. 

The first though then is to consult 
your family physician, who may re- 
fer you to an ear specialist or to a 
dentist, or both. 

. As the largest number of cases 
are caused by disturbance (pres- 
sure) on balancing canals, and this 
disturbance -and- -pressure is caused 
by too much water in the tissues in 
the ear region, the cutting down on 
liquids and salt foods which hold 
water in the tissues should be kept 
in mind. 

— — see 

QUESTION BOX 



be done for 



Q. — Can anything 
veins on the hands? 

A.— Varicose veins on hands a a a j 
be removed safely. 

Q.— What causes diabetes? Is this 
disease always fatal? 

A. — Diabetes is due to the pan- 
creas not manufacturing enough In- 
sulin. There is too much sugar In 
the body. The disease ta fatal un- 
less insulin is taken regularly in 
the amount needed ta tnaMa the 
body to aae up the 







Naturally a man looks old beyond 
his years when he's sore from lum- 
bago or other muscle pains. The 
famous McKesson Laboratories 
developed Soretone Liniment for 
those cruel pains— due to exposure, 
strain, fatigue or over-exercise. Get 
the blessed relief of Soretone's 
cold heat action;— 

1. Quickly Soretone act* to en- 
hance local circulation, 
X, Check muscular cramps. 

3. Help reduce local swelling, 

4. Dilate turf ace capillar}- Mood 
vesseUyM 

Soretone contains methyl salicyl- 
ate, a most effective pain-relieving 
agent. There's only one Soretone— 
insist on it for Soretone results. 
50*. A big bottle, only $1. 



MONEY BACK- 

SORE10NE DOESN'T SATISFY 



SORETONE 



soofhes fast with 

COLD HEAT* 
ACTION 



<£ 



and McKesson makes it" 



to costs of 

MUSCULAR LUMBAGO 
OR BACKACHE 

ins to fatigue sr usswr* 

MUSCULAR PAINS 

duo to loldi 

SORE MUSCLES 

du» ta evwuork 

I MINOR SPRAINS 



♦Though applied cold, rub* 
ficlent lnfredlenU In Sort- 
ton* art like heat to Increaf* 
the iuperilcial supply of 
blood to the area and indue* 
» glawluM mom of warmth. 



CAMELS ARE PACKED 
TO STAY FRESH EVERYWHERE 




I 



I 



aaal 



Hbbubbbb> 



MB 






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■ 



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1» 



Thursday, January 20, 1944 N 



■»■■* 



>■-,.* 




WALTON ADVERTISER 




-tf Ht» ll |. ll | l . l .J« |l .u.j. »». 



BEDTIME 
STORY 

•r 

THQttaOH w. 

ftU««ttS 



PATTERNS 

sSEkVIS/G CIRCLE- 



PETER RABBIT TRIES TO VISIT 
PADDY THE BEAVER 



There's a Surprise With These Spareribs! 

(See Recipes Below) 

Good Taste 




"There are a lot of meat cuts with 
lower point values which we are 
sure we'd like if 
we just knew how 
to prepare them 
tastefully. Won't 
you tell us how?" 
This is a request 
I'm hearing more 
often lately, and 
so today's column 

will give suggestions for these cuts 
of meat. 

■ "Fortunately a great many of these 
lower-point meat cuts belong to the 
variety class, add "variety" to 
meals and are a wonderful source of 
vitamins and minerals. You'll like 
them this way: 

Corn Biscuit Pies. 
(Serves 4 to 6) 
1 veal kidney 
Melted batter or substitute 
1 cup cooked, chopped meat 
1 cup cooked peas 

1 cup cooked carrots 

2 cups well-seasoned medium 
white sauce . * 

Corn biscuit 
Wash kidney; remove outer mem- 
brane. Split through center; re- 
move fat and tubes. Brush with 
melted butter; place 2 inches below 
broiler heat. Broil S minutes on 
each side. Slice kidney; combine 
with meat, peas and carrots. Mix 
with white sauce. Pour into indi- 
vidual baking dishes or casseroles. 
Prepare corn biscuit: Sift together 
1% cups flour, V4 cup cornmeal, 3 
teaspoons bakirlg powder, % tea- 
spoon salt and a few grains of sug- 
ar. Cut in V* cup shortening; add % 
cup milk to make a soft dough. 

Pat or roll out dough, % inch 
thick on lightly floured board; cut 
with round cutter 1 inch in diameter. 
Place biscuits on meat and vegeta- 
ble mixture. Bake in a very hot 
oven (450 degrees) 15 minutes. 
Liver Loaf. 
(Serves 6) 
VA pounds beef liver 
Hi cups dry bread crumbs 
V* cup melted shortening 
1 egg 

Hi teaspoons salt 
% teaspoon pepper 
% teaspoon paprika 
S teaspoons minced onion 
3 tablespoons parsley 
1 cup milk 
Pour scalding water over liver and 
let stand 3 minutes. Chop and add 
all other ingredi- 
ents except milk. 
Mix thoroughly. 
Shape into loaf; 
brush top with 
additional melted 
shortening. Place 
loaf in baking 



Lynn Chambers' Point-Saving 
Menu 



•Stuffed Spareribs with Dressing 

Baked Potatoes 

Buttered Spinach 

Lettuce with French Dressing 

Bran Muffins 

Baked Apple Beverage 

•Recipe Given. 




Lynn Says 



► Working With Points: Adven- 
ture with low point meats and 
you'll find them as delicious as 
the high point ones. They are 
highest in food value and best In 
flavor if properly cooked. 

Doubling up on proteins during 
times like these is wasteful Se- 
lect carefully from this one group 
for the meal: meat, poultry, fish, 
eggs, dried beans or peas or soy- 
beans, cheese or nuts. Remem- 
ber, Just one to a meal! 

Balance the use of cereals with 
plenty of vegetables and fruit 
Naturally cereals and breads 
have to carry more of a load 
these times, but they can't take 
the place of meat and vegetables. 
Use them to make the flavor of 
meat and fish go further. 

Buying in season is your great- 
est help for vegetables and fruits. 
Rich-in-vitamin fruits and vege- 
tables can be found in winter, tool 

Recipes are as good as what 
you put into them. Economizing 
on too many items in the recipe 
will give you— you know what If 
you want precious ingredients In 
recipes use mem sparingly these 
times— for the recipes with a 
pound of this and a dozen of that 
have been put away for the dura- 
tion. 

Save Used Fats! 



dish and add % cup water. Bake in 
a moderate oven (300 degrees) for 
1 hour. For sauce add milk 15 min- 
utes before taking from oven. 

Variation: Grind half beef heart 
and use in place of beef liver. Or, 
grind pork heart' and omit fat in 
recipe. Add % teaspoon poultry 
seasoning. . . 

Heart is not a tender cut of meat 
and is good- only if you cook it prop- 
erly. That means slow cooking at 
slow. -or moderate heat. A stuffing 
adds loads of good flavor: 

Baked Stuffed Beef Heart. 
(Serves 6) 

3 to 4 pound beef heart * 

2 slices bacon 

1 cup fine bread crumbs 

K teaspoon herb or poultry 
seasoning 

1 small onion 

Salt and pepper 

Flour for dredging 

Fat or oil for browning 
Wash heart and remove enough of 
center portion to admit addition of 
dressing or stuffing. Dice bacon and 
fry until crisp. Combine with bread 
crumbs. Season with finely minced 
onion. Season cavity within hearts, 
fill with stuffing and fasten with 
skewers. Roll in flour and brown 
quickly in hot fat in heavy kettle. 
Add small amount of water or beef 
stock. Cover and cook slowly 2 to 
2% hours in a moderate oven (350 
degrees) until done. Thicken liq- 
uid for gravy, if desired. 

Kidney Stew. 

(Serves 5 to 6) 
2 beef kidneys 
Ys cup flour 

S tablespoons drippings 
Salt and pepper 
4 cups water 

1 bay leaf 
Pinch rosemary 

2 tablespoons dried celery leaves 

1 cup -carrots, sliced 

1 cup onion, sliced 

1 cup potato, cubed 

Remove skin and fat from kid- 
neys, wash and split lengthwise. Re- 
move core and cut in small pieces. 
Dredge with flour and brown in hot 
drippings. Place in kettle, add wa- 
ter, vegetables and seasonings. Sim- 
mer 1% to 2 hours. If desired, 
broth may be thickened with a little 
flour and water. 

Variation: If desired, use half kid- 
ney and half stew beef. 

•Stuffed Spareribs. 

2H sheets of spareribs 
Stuffing: 
H loaf bread, cubed 
1 onion, minced fine 
Salt, pepper, sage to taste 
H cap toasted brazil nuts, sliced 
M cap boiling water 
4 tablespoons drippings 
Toast the cubed bread in a hot 

oven, turning to n^vj 

prevent burning. * 

Add onion, sea- 
sonings and sliced 

nuts. Mix well. 

Melt drippings in 

hot water. Add to 

bread - and * toss 

lightly with fork. 

Place dressing 
in center of one sheet of spareribs. 
Cover with second sheet Draw 
edges together and sew -In place. 
Salt outside of meat Pepper, dredge 
with flour. Place in shallow roast- 
ing pan. Bake in a moderate (350- 
degree) oven. Cover bottom of pan 
with a little water. Roast for ltt 
hours. Make gravy from drippings 
In bottom of pan. . 



"T OUGHT to have thought of that 
1 before. My, my, my. How heed- 
less and thoughtless I ami Here 
the winter is nearly over and I 
haven't once been to call on Paddy 
the Beaver. Shame on you, Peter 
Rabbit! Shame on you!" 

Peter said all this to himself as 
he sat just outside the edge of the 
Old Briar Patch looking this way 
and that to make sure that no dan- 
ger was near. The meadows glis- 
tened white and beautiful, for they 
no longer were green, but covered 
with snow. Far, far away, near one 
edge of the meadow was a tall 
elm tree, and in the top of it sat 
Roughleg the Hawk. Peter knew 
that he was there, because he had 
seen him go there. 

"I've nothing to fear from him be- 
cause he is too far away," thought 
Peter. "There is nothing to fear 
from Reddy and Granny Fox, be- 
cause just at break of day I saw 
them on their way home from an 
all-night hunt and they were so 
tired they could hardly walk. There 
is nothing to fear from Hooty the 
Owl, because he is fast asleep by 
this time. Old Man Coyote has 
just gone up to the Old Pasture,- so 
there is nothing to fear from him. 
And so I believe I will just run up in 
the Green Forest and call on Paddy 
the Beaver." 

Farther and farther into the Green 
Forest scampered Peter Rabbit.. It 
was a long way" to the T>6htf made 
by Paddy the Beaver. Peter won- 
dered if he would And things much 





// you want sugar-saving suggestions, 
write to Lynn Chamber*, Western News- 
paper Union, 210 South Desplaines 
Street, Chicago 6, Illinois. Don't for- 
get to enclose a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope for your reply. 
Raltawd by Waotarn Newspaper Union. 



Farther and farther into the Green 
Forest scampered Peter Rabbit. 

changed and what he would find 
Paddy doing. He didn't for a single 
minute doubt that be would find 
Paddy doing something. Somehow 
he couldn't think of Paddy as doing 
nothing. But when he reached the 
edge of the pond made by Paddy 
the Beaver not a sign of life was 
to be seen or heard. 

Peter stopped on the very edge of 
the pond. It was smooth and hard 
and Peter knew that it was very, 
very slippery. Everything around 
was white with snpw, and rising out 
of the pond was a great white 
mound. Peter knew this to be the 
bouse of Paddy the Beaver. 

At first Peter was very much 
puzzled, very much puzzled, indeed. 
Why wasn't the pond covered with 
snow when everything else was? 
There it was, smooth and hard and 
slippery, with not a flake of snow 
on it Could it be that Paddy the 
Beaver had found a way to clear 
the snow off? He did such wonder- 
ful things that Pejer would not have 
been in the leasjt surprised to hava 
found him clearing the pond of snow. 
But Paddy wasn't to be seen, and 
there wasn't any sign of him. Then 
Peter remembered. 

"Oh, you stupid!" said he, talking 
aloud to himself. "Of course Paddy 
didn't clear the snow from his pond, 
because there hasn't been any for 
him to clear away. It snowed be- 
fore the pond froze over. My, how 
clear the ice is! I can see right 
to the bottom of the pond. I wonder 
if I can get over to Paddy's house 
without falling down and bumping 
my nose? Here goes!" 

With that Peter made a long Jump 
out on the smooth, slippery ice, slid 
a little way, slipped, tried to catch 
his balance, slipped again, and then 
suddenly his feet flew quite from 
under him, and down he went on 
thePback of bis head. 

"Oh! Ouch!" cried Peter, and be- 
cause the bump hurt so he wanted 
to dance. Just as if that would 
help it But the very minute he be- 
gan to dance his feet flew out from 
under him again, just as if 
they didn't belong to him, and this 
time Peter bumped his nose. "Oh! 
Ouch!" cried Peter and tried to hold 
the tears back by winking very 
rapidly. "I've heard my mother say 
that there are times when the slow- 
est way is the quickest and I guess 
this is one of them." Peter began to 
crawl toward Paddy's house. 



Not in the Army? 

Stranger— Young man, my son has 
been in the army for two years. He 
is now somewhere in the wilds of 
New Guinea,. You're here, milking 
a cow. Why aren't you at the front? 

Young Man— 'Cause there ain't no 
milk at that end. 



Unlucky in Love 
Mabel— You deceived ma before 
we were married. You said you 
were well off. 
Joe-Yeh! I was but I didn't 
ttl 





On Guard 

Gushing Hostess — You know, 
I've heard a great deal about you. 

Absent-minded Politician— Pos- 
sibly, but you can't prove a thing. 

The Goal 

Pop — Now be good while Tm out. « 
Offspring— I'll be good for a nickel. 
Pop (reprovingly)— Son, you'll never 

be a real son of mine until you're good 

for nothing. 



Whoa There! 

A young woman went into the 
photographer's shop and, produc- 
ing a photograph of her soldier 
.friend, said: "I want this en- 

"Wdlild you like it mounted?" 
"Oh, yes, he'll look nice on a 
horse." 



8562 

12-42 

New Edition 

TpHE new edition of the popular 
* shirtwaist dress has a front 
closing placket— ending just below 
the belt! It gives you all the com- 
fort of the coat dress opening — but 
means fewer buttonholes to be 
made and fewer buttons to be 
sewn on. 

Pattern No. 8562 la in sizes 12, 14, 16, 
18, 20; 40. 42. Size 14, short sleeves, re- 
quires 3*4 yards 39-inch material. 



Slip of Jumper 

OOOD planning brings you in 
VJ this one pattern, a clever 
Jumper pattern for a child— which 
can also be used for a slip! The 
same pattern also includes a 
blouse to wear under the jumper; 
panties to wear under the slip. 

Pattern No. 8557 is designed for. sizes I, 
3, 4, 5 and 8 years. Size 3 jumper re- 
quires l!i yards 39-lnch material, blouse 
1 yard; slip and panties 2>/ t yards with 4 
yards lace edging. 



SEWING CIRCLE PATTERN DEPT. 
530 South Wells St. Chicago 

Enclose 20 cents in coins for each 
pattern desired. 









The Rub 

The tired-looking man sat facing 
the divorce lawyer. "So you want 
a divorce from your wife," said 
the attorney. "Aren't your rela- 
tions pleasant?" 

"Mine are," camp the answer, 
"but hers are simply terrible!" 



The honeymoon is over when he 
begins worrying over how to pay 
the grocer instead of the florist. 



Well, Well, Well! 

Traveler— What is this place) 
noted for? 

Travel Guide— Mister, this is thai 
starting point of the world— you 
can start from here and go any- 
where you want to. 



GRANDMA'S IDEA FOR GOLDS' ACHES 

bue oiten used medicated mutton sue* 
— now many mothers use Penetro, 
modern medication in a base contain- 
ing mutton suet. Rub on— double 
action relieves colds' muscular aches, 
coughing. (1) vaporizes to comfort 
stuffy nose (2) outside, stimulates as 
spot where applied. Get Penetro. 



Shark's- Small Teeth 

Teeth of the whale shark, largest 
living fish, are only one-eighth of 
an inch long. The whale reaches 
a length of 60 feet and ' weighs 
25,000 pounds. 



TABASCO 

The snappiest seasoning known, and 
the world's most widely distributed 
food productl A dash of this piquant 
aauce gives a rare flavor to any food. 

TABASCO— the seasoning secret of 

master chefs for more than 75 yean! 









Time-Tested Advice 
About Chest Colds! 



Grandma Was Right 

Time Has Proved It 

Today, the first choice and family 
standby for relieving miseries of colds 
in millions of homes is the same home- 
remedy grandma used . . . Vicks 
VapoRub! What better recommenda- 
tion could a product have! 

When you rub time-tested VapoRub 
on the throat, chest and back at bed- 



time it starts to work 2 ways at ones 
—and keeps on working for hours to 
relieve Coughing spasms and conges- 
tion in the cold-clogged upper breath- 
ing passages, to ease muscular soreness 
or tightness. It invites restful sleep. 
And often by morning most of the 
misery of the cold is gone! Try it. ' 

Approved 
By Two 
C sas rs Ms M 



VICKS 

*▼ VAPORU8 



Qa HfUVHtNTOMI 




<^ flflm evitvHVWG Aow&RUtt o™u\m qyinlvw too\ 



«#^^^ . 



■ * "PSSJB SjS» > 









' ^Stf'jfS gSinM 



.tM«M*B0J»i3rWlt* 






my 

.avai ,.»••■«■■■► 



WITH food production one of our most important war production programs, you 
need the tractor tire which gives— Extra Pulling Power In All Soil Conditions. * 
That tire is the Firestone Ground Grip. Here's why: 

The Firestone Ground Grip is the only 
tractor tire that has a patented tread design which 
provides up to 215 extra inches of traction bar ~ 



length per tractor, providing a full traction bite, 
greater drawbar pull — and less fuel is used. 



The Firestone Ground Gripis the only tractor tire that has 
the triple-braced tread design. There are no broken bars in the 
tread to cause traction leaks which make the tire slip and spin. 

the Firestone Ground Grip is the only tractor tire that has 
a scientifically designed tread with tapered bars at just the right 
angle for the tread to clean automatically as it pulls. And Vitamic 
Rubber provides longer life by resisting the action of the sun and 
the weather. 

No wonder Firestone Ground Grip tires are first choice of 
farmers everywhere! No other tire has these exclusive extra values 
— and they cost no more than ordinary tires. See your nearby 
Firestone Dealer or Firestone Store today and get the tires that 
give you most for your money. 

Ustnio It, Votes of Firutom with Ricbmd Creaks mU lb, Hr«fo» Symphowy 
Orcbutn, mutsr lbs diction of Howard Bmlow, MomUy ntmutf, opt N. B.C. 



Tirestone 



v» 



GROUND GRIP TIRES 



BUT 
Of RUBBER 



Mr. Extra Traction represents 
the Extra tar length that gives 
Superior Pulling Power to FIRESTONE 
GROUND GRIP TRACTOR TIRES 



MORE FARM TRACTORS ARE EQUIPPED WITH FIRESTONE GROUND GRIP TIRES THAN WITH ANY OTHER MAK 



tta.nl 



wkwnm 



BOB 






WALTON ADVERTISER 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1944 



INDEPENDENCE R. R. 1 

Mrs. L. N. Hoffman who has 
been quiet ill the past couple of 
weeks with the flu, is much im- 
proved. 

We are glad to welcome Mrs. 
Thomas Barkerss back to Sunday 
school. She has had a very, severe 
cold the past couple Sundays and 
could not be out. 

The farmers are very busy 
stripping their tobacco and gett- 
ing it on the market while prices 
are wwy good. 

Miss Reva Richardson enter- 
tained on- last Thursday evening 



with a rook party in. honor of her 
brother, Wayne who was home on 
a twenty-day furlough from 
Panama. Wayne left Saturday 
morning for California, not know- 
ing just where he will be stat- 
iQned. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Ballanger 
spent the week-end with his 
cousin, Ralph Brannock and wife 
of Cincinnati, Ohio.- 

Mrs. John Klein and daughters, 
Lodeana and TJelores and children 
spent Friday afternoon with Mrs. 
Roy Klein and children on Taylor 
Mill Pike. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Maddox 



OPA RELEASE OF WOMEN'S 
FOOTWEAR 



_L 



DAILY PROOF YOU DO SAVE HERE 



No Lay-Aways 
No Exchanges 
Every Sale Pinal 




• Leather Uppers 

• Gabardine Uppers 

• Real Leather Soles 



m »] 



Odds and ends, 
all sizes in the 
"Vf*up. but not in 
every style 



$0.00 



% 



• High Heels 

• Medium Heels 

• Low Heels 



NO RATION STAMP NEEDED 

QUALITY SAMPLE SHOES 



I 



627 Madison Ave. 



Covington 



CO. 1430 



DEAD STOCK REMOVED FREE 

For Prompt Removal of Horses and Cows 

CALL VALLEY 0887 

WE PAY 'PHONE CHARGES 

Ky. Dead Animal Disposal Co. 



LOCKLAND 



OHIO 



NEW CROP 

DIXIE BRAND 

SEEDS 



SOLD ONLY AT HILL'S 



High in germination and purity . , . best 
all-round results assured. We advise 
you to buy them at your earliest con- 
venience . . . begin now to make 1944 the 
biggest year you ever had ... it's up to 
you! 



tame 



Quality Since 1863 



CEORCE W. 



Since 1863 

ILL 



AMP 



COMPANY 



SEEDSMEN SINGE 1863 



24-26 W. 
SEVENTH ST. 



25-29 PIKE 
STREET 



COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



I SINCE 1863 



called on Mr. and Mrs. Dawson 
Ballanger one hay the past week. 

Rev. Cardwell fulfilled his re- 
gular appointment at Staffords- 
burg Sunday. Our attendance was 
a little larger and we are hoping 
to have a beautiful sunshinny day 
on our next church day, perhaps 
that will help to get our people 
out. Our Church School is holding 
up very good, oweing te so much 
sickness and bad weather, try to 
keep on coming, 

Mr. and Mrs. Stallcup spent the 
day Saturday in Covington visit- 
ing with their children and grand 
children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Hanna called 
on their son, Harley and family 
Sunday afternoon and also visit- 
ed with Mrs. Garnett Craignyle 
who has been confined to her bed 
the past five weeks with the flu, 
but is much improved at present. 



UNION 



The many friends of Dr. G. R. 
Coe were very glad to see him in 
Union Saturday. Dr. Coe is a Capt. 
in the Army and is stationed in 
South Carolina at present. 

Miss Vera Robinson, who makes 
her home in Erlanger was the 
week-end guest of her parents 
here. 

The cookie sale held at New- 
man's Store Saturday by the G. A. 
Girls was quite a success. Future 
sales will be held and the proceeds 
will go to sponsor a member at 
Clear Creek Camp next summer. 

Pvt. Russell Doane has returned 
to his camp in California after 
having spent his first furlough 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. 
W. Doane of Waltqn, R. 2. 

Mr. Charles Wilson Was the 
Saturday night guest of his 
friends Mr. arid Mrs. Clinton 
Jones. 

Mrs. Charles Hedges, Mrs. C. P. 
Hedges and Mrs. J. W. Doane were 
shopping in Covington Thursday. 

Deepest sympathy is extended 
the family of Mr. Will Souther- 
land as his passing last week 
bro'ught 1 grief to the hearts of his 
many friends here. 



Mr. Floyd Smith of Cincinnati 
was visiting his mother and family 
last Thursday. 

Mrs. J. T. Bristow and Mrs. 
Elmer Noe and children Jimmie 
and Kathleen were visiting Mr. 
and Mrs. Harold Weaver and 
family of Erlanger one day last 
week. 

Many farmers of this commun- 
ity are reporting good prices for 
tobacco sold so far. Due to the 
late bulking season there is much 
more to be stripped and it is hop- 
ed the high prices will continue 
throughout the season. 

Rev. and Mrs. Henry Beach of 
Louisville were the Sunday guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. R. K.' Newman 
and family. 



REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 

30 a. farm, modern house, electric, 
bath, good poultry house and 
barn. 

30 a. poultry farm, equipped for 
200 hens. Ideal for hatchery 
which we need at Walton badly. 
Modern house and other good 
outbuildings. Good sale for 
^produce right at home. 

40 a. farm, 1 mile from town. 

4 a. farm, good 6-room house, 
electric, garage, chicken house, 
smoke house. 

4-Room house and 1 acre ground 
in Walton. 

- A. C. JOHNSON 

120 N. Main Phone 125, Walton 

120 N. Main, Walton. Ky., Ph. 125 



FOR SALE— Two Jersey cows, six 
and seven years old. One re- 
gistered; Ayshire Bull, eighteen 
months old and one-horse corn 
drill. Robert M. Hoffman, Green 
. Road, Walton. Ky. 2t-8* 



FOR SALE— 23 head of sheep— 
or will trade for cows. Marion 
(Dutch) Elliott. Fiskburg, Ky., 
S L Highway. 2t-8* 



WANTED— Tenant with team and 
tools to crop on shares-20 acres 
of corn, tobacco and other farm 
products. 5-room house and 
plenty of pasture furnished. 
Apply 18 Chambers Ave., Wal- 
ton or 2029 Scott St., Covington, 
Ky. 2t-8* 



FOR SALE— 3 fresh cows with 
calves by side, also one work 
horse. George Menke, Walton, 
Ky. 2t-8* 



FARM HELP WANTED— Three 
tenants, tobacco base of 12 
acres, raise tobacco and work by 
day only — Seperate home for 
each. Vess Gaines and Sons, 
Burlington, Ky., Phone 251. 
2t-8* 




FARMS FOR SALE 



Boone Co. Special — Will pass for 
Farm Tenant Loan 

88 acres near Walton, house, 2 
barns, corn crib, chicken house, 
fenced, watered, (tobacco base 
4 acres), 5 thousand tobacco 
sticks, team, cow, tools all goes 
for $5500. 

58 acres near Rich wood', 5-room 
house, electric, large barn, rich 
land, immediate posession, 3 
acre tobacco base, 8 cow stalls, 
sanitary milk house. Price 
$5750. Federal loan $3200 at 
5%. 

60 acres near Walton, 4-room 
house and barn. Immediate 
posession. Price $4500. $1000 
cash, balance at 4% interest. 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



RADIO REPAIRS at reasonable 
rates, colonial 1121. 509 Scott 
Street. tf-lt 



NOTICE— Pure Drinking Water 
Hauled anywhere — anytime 
Call Walton 423. Jas. E. Falls, 
tf-47 



MAYTAG WASHER— Parts and 
repairing. Wm. Hagedorn, 856 
Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Ky. 
tf-49 



20 TEARS in radio servicing. W 
M. STEPHENSON, Radio spec- 
ialist, T>09 Scott Blvd., Coving- 
ton. COlonial 1121. tf-10 



WANTED— A capable house- 
keeper, must like children. 
Address reply to Walton Adver- 
tiser, Dept. W., Walton, Ky. tf5 



WE HAVE NOTICED THIS: 

The funeral home, our funeral home, is coming into more 
nearly universal use all the time; indeed, the tendency to use 
the Chambers and Grubbs funeral home, rather, than the 
private residence, is quite noticable. 

The reasons are not difficult to find: Our funeral home, 
located in an attractive residental district, has all the desirable 
features of the private residence, plus many features which 
only a funeral home could possess. 

CHAMBERS & GRUBBS 



Funeral Directors 



Phone Walton 352 



RADIOS FOR SALE— Philco 11 
tube, all wave cabinet $55. 
Detrolia table model, price,$35. 
Violetts Place, piner, KyA&l'ltO* 



LOST^-A ring of keys, between 
Walton and Dry Ridge. Finder 
please leave keys at Advertiser 
Office. 



FOR SALE— Walnut hat-rack 
with mirrow; used 9x12 axmin- 
ister rug; folding-bed, maho- 
gany finish, in splendid condit- 
ion. Mrs. R. E. Ryle, Walton, 
Ky., Phone 26. 2t-8* 



GUITARS— $15 up; Roy Acuff 
and other books. String and 
accessories. Hanser Jewelry and 
Music, 515 \ 2 Madison, Coving- 
ton, Ky. lt-9 



I Specalize In Land- 
• Farms. 



-I Need 



REL C. WAYMAN 

623 Washington St., Cov., Ky. 
HEmlock 5107 In*. 5064 



FOR SALE— Chicks, eggs from 
high-producing, tested Reds. 
Don't delay, order early. Simplex 
brooders, Salsbury remedies. 
Grant Maddox, Florence, Ky., 
Phone 384. -^^- 15t-9* 



FOR SALE: — Good paying Paper 
Route in Walton, Ety. See 
Richard Collins, Walton, Ky. 
lt-9* 



con- 



FARM FOR SALE— 124 Acres 
mile West of Verona, on 
crete highway No. 16. Seven 
room brick house, 3 barns, well 
watered, 5% a. tobacco base, 
good land, high state "'of culti- 
vation. Electric and water in 
house, Selling on account of ill 
health. A. T. Hunt, Verona, Ky. 
Phone Walton 1243. 2t-9" 



FOR RENT— One of the best 
tobacCo farms in Carroll Co. 
with interest in sheep, beef, and 
dairy cattle. Come in and talk it 
over. Mrs. S. G. Tilton, Gent, 

. Ky 4t-7* 



FOR SALE— 150 barrel corn. C. B. 
Norman, 26 South Main St., 
Walton, Ky. 3t-7* 



FOR SALE— 1 Cabinet Grand 
Piano; 1 Dining Room Table; 
1 Bed; 1 Vanity and Overstuff- 
ed Chair — All in good condition. 
Ed. Jones, 141 N. Main St., Wal- 
ton, Ky., Phone 170. lt-9* 



FOR SALE— 56 head Native Ewes. 
W. L. Markesberry, Verona, Ky., 
R. R. 1. lt-9* 



WANTED TO BUY— Used fur- 
niture, good and bad; antiques; 
coins; old glassware; old pic- 
tures; books and buttons. John 
Stubblefied. Walton, Ky., R-r2. 
Phone 495. 6t-9* 



FOR SALE— Walnut hat-rack 
with mirror; folding bed in 
splendid condition; oak book 
case; desk chair; rocker with 
leather seat and a doctor's 
metal chair. Mrs. R. E. Ryle, 
Walton, Ky., Ph. 26. lt-9* 



WANTED— Sales Lady at the 
Dixie Dry Goods Store, Elsmere, 
Ky., Mrs. L. Hersling. lt-9 



WANTED TENANT — For Stock 
Farm— No Tobacco.* Owner will 
furnish all tools, house, 2 shoats, 
1 milk cow, 10 acres for own use 
and will pay $30.00 per month. 
Good trot line fishing in Lick- 
ing river, 6 miles from Coving- 
ton, Ky. A. G. Wern, Spring 
Lake Pk., Spring Lake, Ky. 5t-9* 



LOST STRAYED OR STOLEN— 
German Short Hair Pointer, 
male dog, liver, and liver and 
white ticked— no white. W. G. 
Hargis, Wright Rd., Walton, 
Ky., R. 1. lt-9* 



-REGISTERED JERSEYS- 
WHY SELECTIVE REGISTRATION? 

Protects Buyer: Too many times the buyer has accepted an 
implied "guarantee" in the registration certificate that was 
not there in fact. Ancestry was guaranteed, but the KIND of 
ancestry was not. Buyers of Registered Jersey Bulls now have 
assurance that their interests are in part protected by a study 
of the production history in the immediate ancestry of their 
bull calf. 

HERD T B AND BANG TESTED 

S. WHITEHOUSE DUNLAP - FARM 

L. C. Fish, Herdsman, Richwood, Ky., U. S. No. 25 



FOR SALE— 8 shoats; 1 white 
male hog, weight 200 lbs. and 

1 bred sow. Carrel McFarland, 

2 Ms miles EasJ of Devon on 
Bristow Pike. 2t-9* 



HAY WANTED— Alfalfa, Clover, 
Soybean and Timothy. State 
price per. ton,, A. G. Wern, 
Springlake, Ky. It9* 



WE ARE NOW TAKING ORDERS FOR 
BABY CHICKS 

We Sell Dr. Salsbury's Poultry Remedies, Poultry 
Feeders, Water Founts, Etc. 

FUL-O-PEP FEED STORE 



512 PJKE STREET 

COVINGTON, 

KY. 



j J&1 ■ <bl/df tVUfU 

| N«tion-v..«t POULTRY 
HI Al 1 H SERVICE , 



HEMLOCK 9168 

Open Sundays Till 

Noon 




From where I sit . . 



fy Joe Marsh 



I set the alarm ahead the other 
morning to hear a so-called tem- 
perance broadcast. Bern' a tem- 
perance man myself I was" in 
hopes of hearing a good talk. 

Temperance and moderation 
are the same thing, my diction- 
ary says. But this speaker didn't 
discuss temperance, ^at all. 

It was. a hysterical, rabble- 
rousing hodge-podge advocatin' 
an impractical prvhil„ Jwte^ 

He told of anonymous people 
who'd come to horrible fates. 

He drew liberally on things 
that happened 2000 years ago. 

But he couldn't get around 
the fact that, no matter how 



folks hare changed in 20 cen- 
turies, they still like moderate 
sociability with their fellow-man. 

From where I sit, that's where 
beer comes in. Those who like 
it, set a heap o' store on a mod- 
erate glass with friends. 

The occasional immoderate 
drinker is far outnumbered by 
those who die each year of glut- 
tony and overrating! He is no 
more approved by moderate folks 
than by "temperance" speakers. 



NEW JAMES 
THEATRE 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 

SHOW EACH AND EVERT NTTE 
AT 7:30 CENTRAL WAR TIME 
SUNDAY MATINEE AT 2:30 
CENTRAL WAR TIME. BAR- 
GATN NIGHTS MONDAY AND 
THURSDAY. 

All children regardless of age 
must have a ticket for each show. 
No parking allowed west of side- 
walk in front of Theatre or filling 
station adjoining. Police Orders. 

BIG DOUBLE FEATURE 

PROGRAM 
FRIDAY and SATURDAY 1 

Jan. 21 -22nd 
Mary Lee and John Archer 

SHANTY-TOWN 

PLUS 

Tim Holt - Cliff Edwards 

PIRATES^OF THE 

PRAIRIE 



NO PRIORITIES 

ARE NEEDED FOR FARM TOOLS WELDED 

R. Michels Welding 
Company 

722 Washington St. Covington COlonial 0670 



$*%**£ 



© 1944, BREWING INDUSTRY FOUNDATION • KENTUCKY COMMITTEE 
BARRY D. FRANCE, State Director, 1523 HEVBURN BIDS., LOWS WL IE 



Jon Hall - Maria Montez and Sabu 

WHITE "SAVAGE 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 23rd 
Bkmdie and Dagwood 

footlight" glamour 

Also new serial chapter No. 1 

DAREDEVILS OF THE 
. WEST 

Don't miss seeing this first 
chapter of this thrilling 
" serial. 
MONDAY, JANUARY 24th 



See the astonishing story of a 
Nazi sky-spy who flew his way 
right into the R. A. F. 

Amazing - Baffling - Breath 

Taking 

ERIC PORTMAN-ANN DVORAX 

squadron"leader X 

TUES. & WED., JAN. 25-26th 



FARMS FOR SALE 

131 acres, 7 mi. Williamstown. 10 mi. Falmouth, near school, church 
and stores on Route 22. Improvements consists of an excellent 
7-room frame house, bath room, halls, electric, one barn, ex- 
cellent chicken house, new crib, large smoke house, garage, plenty 
water, large Cteek, two branches, springs, 2 cisterns, well, large 
concrete fish pond, also large fish reservoir, just built. The 
flower garden and grounds has most all kinds of flowers and 
many shrubs. 3.3 tobacco base for coming year. Plenty of lespe- 
deza hay. Good tobacco and corn crop this year to speak for the 
productivity of soil. Large woodland and many fine oak trees 
ready for saw. Also many walnuts. Will sell team, tools and 

stock seperately, if purchaser desires. Farm only price $6,800 

147 acres, 3 mi. Dry Ridge, 6 room house, electric, phone, 3 barns, 

app. 6 acres tobacco base, Federal Loan. Price $10,200 

90 acres 4 mi. Williamstown on Baton Rouge Pike, good farm, well 

improved in fix'cellent neighborhood, hard road. Price .:. $6,800 

200 aores near THencoe, 10-room, 2 hall house, plenty dairy barns 

and tobacco barns. Use tractor. Price $15,000 

100 a. 5 miles from Verona, No. 16, modern house. Price $5^300 

74 a. hd. road, near No. 22, 2-room new house. Price. $2,200 

100 a. f mi. Walton, 7-room house, black top road. Price $12,500 

120 a., 3-room house, across road from 100 a. Price $9^000 

147 a. Grant Co. near Elliston, 3-room house. Price $26 per acre 

39 a. large 4-room house, 3 mi. Dry Ridge, hd. road. Price $2,700 

175 a. 5-room house, two large barns, fine dairy farm, hard road, 

Portland, Pendleton county, Price $6,500 

178 a. 3 mi. Williamstown, Rt. 36, well improved. Price $9^000 

111 a. 3-room house, lies well, near Flingsville, Grant. Price $4,800 

34 a. 3 mi. Wmstown, hd. 5-room house, 2 barns. Price $2,900 

275 a. Elliston, Grant Co., 3 sets bldgs. Price .'.:... $10,800 

145 a. near 36 on hard rd. 7-room house, 2 barns. Price $6,400 

118 a. 3 mil Wmstown, Cynthiana Rd. 10-room house. Price ...$10,000 

160 a. 4-room house, 3 barns, Grant County. Price..... $6,300 

304 a. 1 mi. Mason, hard rd. 2 sets new bldgs. Price. $44 per acre 

a. 6-room house, LLL 2 mi. Falmouth $6,500 

% a. Chipman Ridge, 7-room modern house, 2 tobacco barns € 

acre tobacco base. Price .? $9,000 

a. in Mason, on Dixie, 9-room house, also 4-rom house, 2 barns, 

well watered, electric. Price >.., (7 500 

a. Gardnersville, Pendleton County, 4-room house, 2 barns, 4 a. 

tobacco base. Price $6,500 

a. 5 mi. Williamstown, improved. Price ~f4J0fl 

a. Grant Co. near Clarks Creek Church, improved. Price'!" $2800 
223 a. 2 sets of good buildings, good tobacco and dairy farm ' all 
tractor land, in edge of Verona, Boone Co. Price \ $20 000 

112 a. 1 mi. Verona, Boone County, 7-room excellent house, beauti- 
ful location, good grounds, good road', 4 a. tob. Price $12,000 

40 percent down payment and rest on liberal terms; in some cases 5 
. . percent interest, applies to many of the above farms. 



76 
148 

152 

183 

85 
60 



The Mutual Realty Company 

FALMOUTH— KY.— WILLIAMSTOWN 

FOREST S. THOMPSON, Proprietor 



FALMOUTH PHONE 2817 

Secretary, Williamstown Phone 2951 and 326. 

Scott, Sr., Auction Mgr. 



Everett Chipman, 

Col. Elva R. Kendall, Auctioneer; Geo 



Y« 



Unlversary of Ky. Library 
LEXINGTON KY i 



■ 



tt 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



— NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER — 
Devoted To the Interest of Boone, Kenton, Gallatin and Grant Countiek-Kenton-CampbeU Courier Cmuolidated With the Advertiser 



Subscription $1.50 Per Year In Advance 



Christmas Seal 
Sale Goes Over 
Top In County 



R. V. Lents, Executive Secretary 
of the Boone County Tuberculosis 
Association reports $828.47 as the 
amount of Tuberculosis Christ- 
mas Seals sold during the last 
drive. Mr. Lents stated through 
the columns of -.this newspaper 
two weeks ago that repotrs were 
coming in slowly, and at that time 
it did not appear the goal would 
be reached. A goal of $725 was set 
l«r the county, and the sale went 
more than $100 over the goal. 

The Kentucky Tuberculosis As- 
sociation and National Tubercu- 
losis Association gets 33% of the 
sale, and it cost about 5% of the 
sale for stationery, stamps, and 
prizes for the school children who 
aided in the drive. This leaves 
more than 62% of the gross sale 
to be used to aid in stamping out 
tuberculosis right here in Boone 
County. 

The sale of each community 
was as follows: 

Belleview $ 45.37 

Burlington 105.05 

Burlington Col. 22.05 

Constance 69.05 

Florence ,.-...: 152.56 

Hamilton 23.50 

Hebron 140.27 

Union 65.35 

Petersburg 39.96 

Walton *. 116.21 

Verona 44.00 

Anonymous 5.10 



WALTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, January 27, 1944 




Willing: Workers Class 
Entertained. 



The Willing Workers Class met 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Wallace Qrubbs on Tuesday, Jan- 
uary 18th. The Devotional was 
led by Mary Ransler. 

Those present were: Mr. and 
Mrs. Cecil Ashcraft, Mr. and Mrs. 
Powers Conrad, Mr. and Mrs. 
Cloyd Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. W. 
W. Rouse, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
Ransler, Rev. and Mrs. Q. S. 
Caroland, Mr. and Mrs. C. B. 
Jones, Mary Ransler, Virginia 
Schawb, jane Weber,, Mrs. Made- 
line Gault, Helen Ruth Gardner, 
Vern James, Mary Humprey, 
Aleen Conner, Martha Jane Car- 
penter, Sam Johnson, Shirley Lou 
Carpenter, Patsy Jones, Jannette 
Grubbs and Mary Elizabeth 
Grubbs. 



Tobacco Specialist 
To Meet With 
County Growers 



VOLUME 30— NUMBER 10 



Surprise Party Given In 
Honor Of William Finer. 



Blood Donors 
May Give Blood 
At Williamstown 



TOTAL $828.47 



$55.19 Tobacco Average 
Received By Local Farmers. 



James A. Orr and David Hous- 
ton" of the Walton — Richwood 
Road, sold 3,558 pounds of tobacco 
at the Carrollton Warehouse the 
first part of January for an aver- 
age of $55.19 a hundred. 



Landlord — Tenants 
Trades Completed. 



^ 



The largest number of landlord 
tenant trades' of any time the 
past year were made last week 
according to W. M. Smith, Farm 
Labor Assistant. Activity is ex- 
pected to pick up until March 1st, 
the usual date for tenant moves. 

There still remain a large num- 
ber of landlord and tenant place- 
ments to be made. There are also 
a number of requests for day and 
month, hands to be filled. Anyone 
knowing of available help not now 
employed is urged to notify the 
County Agent's Office. 



Anyone from Walton or sur 
rounding community who wishes 
to donate' a pint of their blood 
to the Blood Bank are invited to 
come to the Williamstown School 
House on the following dates: 
Tuesday, Feb. 8th, Wednesday, 
Feb. 9th, and Thursday, Feb. 10th, 
from 12:00 to 5:00 p. m. each day. 

Blood Donors are urgently need- 
ed and anyone able to' comply 
with the following regualtions are 
urged to be at Williamstown on 
one of the dates mentioned above. 

1. No one under 18 or over 65 
years. 

2. Blood pressure over 200 or 
under 100 will not be accept- 
able. 

3. Don't eat or drink anything 
for at least 3 'a hours before 
donation. However black 
coffee (without cream) and 
plain toast may be had be- 
fore donation, also tea. 

4. No one accepted who has 
ever had jaundice. 

5. Written consent of parent 

or guardian necessary for 

those between 18 and 21 yrs. 

Sandwiches and drinks served 

after donation. 

Minister Called At Local 
Baptist Church: 



Russell Hunt, tobacco specialist 
from the College of Agriculture 
will meet with county growers on 
Friday, February 25th according" 
to H. R. Forkner, County Agent. 
Mr. Hunt will discuss new pro- 
duction practices recommended 
for 1944. 

There are many new recom- 
mendations and practices in 
tobacco production that are bring- 
ing growers greater cash returns. 
The exact time of the meeting will 
be announced in the near future. 
Priming Pays Tobacco Growers 

The priming or pulling, of the 
over ripe lower leaves from the 
tobacco stalks before cutting time 
was tried the past year on an ex- 
tensive scale in the county for the 
first time, according to the County 
Agent's Office. Reports on this 
work will be made from time to 
time. Two sales reported recently 
indicate this practice is profitable. 
•^J. F. Cleek of Beaver recently 
sold over $300 worth of primed 
leaves from three acres and re- 
ported profitable results. The 
primed leaves averaged approxi- 
mately 50c per pound. 

James G. Pennington of Walton 
reports that he sold 300 pounds 
of primed leaf from three acres 
that averaged $56 per hundred 
pounds. 

, Most growers are agreeing that 
where labor is available priming 
is a profitable practice. The har- 
vesting of the primed leaves can 
easily be done by children. 



Birthday Party 



Rev. Burton Garrett of Bethel, 
Ohio, has accepted the call of the 
First Baptist Church of Walton. 

Rev. and Mrs. Garrett and 
family expec^ to move here and 
begin their work about March 1st. 




Mr. and Mrs. Raymond C. 
Winans of Mason, Ohio delight- 
fully entertained on Sunday after- 
noon with a party for their little 
son, C. G. who was nine years old 
that day. 

Those present were: Anna Mae 
Putman, Phyllis Edens, Cathleen 
Mussinan, Sue Troxell, Jimmy 
Putman,. Everete Glacken and 
Mrs. Margaret Cooke. C. G. re- 
ceived many nice and useful gifts 

After an enjoyable afternoon 
was spent refreshments were 
served and they all left wishing 
him many more" very happy 
birthdays. 



Mr. and Mrs. Russell Pmer en- 
tertained with a lovely surprise 
party for their son Bill who left 
Friday, January 21st to enter 
"boot" camp at the Great Lakes 
Naval Training Station. It was a 
happy gathering of family and 
friends. Various musical instru- 
ments were played by Mr. Stephen 
Ammerman, Mr. Jim Allen, and 
M*. Piner. Mr. Ammerman and 
Mr. Allen also sang some of our 
best known and best liked songs. 
The music was enjoyed by all. 

A delightful biiffett lunch was 
served consisting of sandwiches, 
coffee, salads, pop corn balls, do- 
nuts and cake. The cakes were 
decorated beautifully. One was 
decorated in red, white and blue 
with U. S. Navy across the top. 
Bill at the bottom and a miniature 
flag in the center. The other was 
a birthday cake in pink and white, 
it being the birthday of one of 
the guests, Mrs. Rachel Curtin. 

Bill received numerous gifts, all 
of which were useful. 

The guest were as follows: Mr. 
and Mrs. Stephen Ammerman and 
children, Mr. and Mrs. William 
Lancaster, Mr. and Mrs. Scott 
Lancaster and Bobby Ray, Mr and 
Mrs. Oscar Lunsford, Ruthie and 
Tommie Lunsford, Mr. and Mrs. 
Clarence Jackson and son Wal- 
mer, Mrs: Rachel Curlin, Mr.- Jim 
Allen, Mr. and Mrs. 'Basil Luns- 
ford and son Wayne, Mt. and Mrs. 
William Jarrell and \ daughter 
Lynn, Mr. and Mrs. Pinter,. Mary 
Lee and Bill Piner. , *\. 

The party broke up with every- 
one wishing Bill all ttte luck and 
success in his training. The 
Advertiser joins his many friends 
in wishing him well. 



School Children 
Injured In Bus 
Wreck Wednesday 



Students along Dricoursey pike 
attending Simon Kenon High 
School made arrangements last 
week to board their bus at a 
different time for the next several 
days as the result of the bus crash 
Wednesday in which 48 students 
were hurt, seven severly, and the 
bus heavily damaged after it had 
overturned at the foot of Piner 
Hill. 

* 

J. A. Caywood, superintendent 
of Kenton county schools, said a 
revision of schedules was made in 
order to accomodate the students 
along the line serviced by the 
school buses so there would be no 
overcrowding. 

Drivers of the buses, Dewey 
Fisk and Adrian Durr, adminis- 
tered first aid after the accident 
and were- credited with preventing 
many of the children being in- 
jured seriously. 

The buses, which were gravel- 
ing in opposite directions, crashed 
when the Simon Kenton bus, 
driven by Mr. Durr, skidded as the 
brakes were applied at the foot of 
the hill. The bus of Mr. Fisk had 
stopped at the bottom of the hill 
to take on a student and Mr. Durr 
was stopping his bus in compli- 
ance with the state law that 
states: "No vehicle may pass a 
school bus when it is taking on or 
discharging passengers." 

Striking a patch of ice; the bus, 



Eradication of Household 
Pests Planned. 

Plans were made to eradicate 
many household pests by leaders 
who attended a Training Class 
last week in Burlington. Miss Ida 
C. Hagman conducted the all day, 
class attended by fourteen leaders 
representing seven clubs. 

Damage to property, life habits 
of importance to effective control 
and methods of control served as 
an outline for the study of house- 
hold pests sucn as -silver fish, 
cockroaches, flies, mosquitoes, 
moths and many other pests. The 
group decided that an effective 
campaign should be promoted in 
each community to destroy and 
prevent flies and mosquitoes. 

The study of "Household Pests" 
will be the t nagic lesson presented 
to homemakers at their local 
clubs in February. 



Bond Chairmen 
Urged To Organize 
Local Workers 



Income Tax Man To 
Be At Burlington 
Feb. 16 thru 19th 



Collector of Internal Revenue, 
S. R. Glenn, announces that a 
deputy from his office will visit 
Burlington Feb. 16th thru 19th at 
8:30 a. m. 1944, for the purpose of 
assisting individual taxpayers in 
preparing their returns. Mr. GleniV 
says that the new Revenue Act is 
in many particulars different 
from the laws previously in effect 
Special attention is called to the 
many changes affecting taxpayers 



R. M. Hall Returns 
To Frankfort 



George N. Parsons 



George N. Parsons, well known 
farmer passed away Saturday at 
his home on -lower river road, 
North Bend, following a short 
illness. 

Funeral services were conducted 
from the home Tuesday at 2 p. m. 
with the Rev. C. C. Helton, pastor 
of Sand Run Baptist Church 
officiating. Interment was in 
Hebron Cemetery. 

Mr. Parsons is survived by his 
widow, Mrs. Lenora Parsons and 
one son, Stanley Parsons. 

Chambers and Grubbs were in 
charge of funeral arrangements. 



ijov 

Good" Eyesight 

AVOID "HARD LOOKS" 

If you suffer difficulties of 
vision, Glasses we furnish will 
solve, your every Sight-trouble. 
Eyestrain, f and its resulting ner- 
vous uncertainty and irritability, 
will vanish. Once more you will 
see accurately, comfortably. 



DR. J. O. TYSON 

Optometrist 
. OFFICES WITH 

MOTCH 

Optician — Jewelers 

613 MADISON AVE. COVINGTON, KY. 

Established 1857 



Better Production 
Practices Planned 
By Local Farmers 



Leading farmers meeting in 
Community meetings are planning 
to carry out better production 
practices in 1944 according to H. 
R. Forkner, County Agent. Meet- 
ings the past week were held in 
Hebron, Verona, Hamilton and 
Grant Communities. ' Meetings 
during the next ten days will be 
held in Florence, Walton, New 
Haven, Petersburg, Constance and 
Burlington Communities. 

Better farm practices planned* 
for 1944 to-date include greater 
use of cover crop and permanent 
pastures, improved quality of hay 
crops, use. of higher yielding 
hybrid seed corn, more economical 
feeding of dairy cows, parasite 
control in sheep, adjustment of 
hog and poultry numbers and 
healthy stock production, heavy 
uses of fertilizers to reach a goal 
of a ton of tobacco per acre, im- 
proved truck crops production and 
a more complete home food pro- 
duction program and the greater 
uses of farm labor saving equip- 
ment. 

Farmers are faced with strenous 
production problems in 1944. The 
careful study of these problems at 
this time is considered by the 
leaders as most important. All 
farmers are invited to attend the 
meetings held in their communit- 
ies. 



R. M. Hall .Representative of 
Boone and Gallatin Counties, 
spent the week-end with his 
family, and from him we learn 
that the General Assembly is now 
getting sufficiently organized to 
begin actual business in the next 
week or so. 

Many important measures are 
pending, and Mr. Hall would be 
glad to hear from any resident of 
either county giving him their 
views concerning any pending 
matter.. 

Of course he can not agree in 
advance to vote for or against any 
specific measures, but the Legis- 
lature has shown an inclination 
thus far to be an independent 
body and Mr. Hail in thorough 
accord with this idea and mani- 
fests his desire to know the views 
of his constiuents, so that he may 
reflect their views concerning 
pending matters as they come up 
for final action. He is taking a 
great interest in the future of our 
State and all Boone and Gallatin 
County citizens should feel free 
to contact him on any proposition 
for the benefit of Kentucky. 

Mr. Hall returned to Frankfort 
Monday afternoon. 



driven by Mr. Durr and 'en route in the Amed Forces, and parti- 



Notice — Change In Time 



to Simon Kenton High School, 
plunged across the road, struck 
the front of the other bus, and 
overturned. 

After Mr. Durr had crawled 
from the wreckage, Mr. Fisk and 
he immediately began removing 
the -children, who were piled atop 
one another. 

No children in the Piner School 
bus were injured and only minor 
damage was done to the bus. 

Of the 55 students injuried, 
seven required medical attention; 
others returned home for treat- 
ment of shock. 

Francis Peebles, 17, Bracht Sta- 
tion, Kenton county, was carried 
to a nearby home on an improvis- 
ed stretcher and treated by Dr. F. 
A. Daugherty, Independence, for 
a deep knee cut. 

Six other students were treated 
at the, off ices of Dr. Charles M. 
Petty, Independence. They were 
Allen Culbertson, broken left arm; 
Lydia Connelly, both legs cut, and 
Geraldine Mullen. Elizabeth Bo- 
wen, Violet Bass and Catherine 
Jennings, leg and arm cuts. 

Mr. Caywood, upon hearing of 
the accident, rushed to the scene 
and took charge. 

Real Estate News 



cularly the additional allowances 
for personal exemption for tax- 
payers in the Armed Forces. 

The Collector says that the 
many changes made cannot be 
explained in a short notice, but 
that his deputy is familiar with 
the law and is being sent here to 
be of real service to the taxpaying 
public. The service is absolutely 
free. Collector Glenn urges the 
taxpayers of this county to see the 
deputy and let him help with their 
income tax problems 



Riley Classmate, Mrs. Wilson, 
Dies At Home of Son. 



The Walton Woman's Literary 
eiub will meet at 2 p. m. at -the 
home of Mrs. Barnett Franks, 
Wednesday, February 2nd. A gtfest 
speaker from Lexington will lead 
the program. 

All are urged to be on time. 
— Club Reporter. 



Woman's Missionary Society 



The W. M. S. of the Walton 
Baptist Church held their regular 
meeting in the church Wednesday, 
January 19th with the new pre- 
sident, Mrs. William Soden in the 
chair. A very interesting program, 
under the leadership of Mrs. 
Margaret Wilson was enjoyed. 

Those present were: Mrs Bertha 
Baker, Mrs. James Bolington, Mrs. 
Frances Brittenhelm, Mrs. Bess 
Conrad, Mrs. E. B. Powers, Mrs. 
John Fagan, Mrs. F. E. Fisher, 
Mrs. Bamette Franks, Mrs. Nettie 
Fullilove, Mrs. Ira Harris, Mrs. D. 
K. Johnson, Mrs. Dulaney John- 
son, «Mrs. T. W. Jones, Mrs. Perry 
Mann, Mrs. Chas. Montgomery, 
Mrs. Carl Nuemeister, Mrs. Joe 
Nuemeister, Mrs. Thedore Nue- 
meister, Mrs. Kate Noel, Mrs. 
Susie Norman, Mrs. Nathan 
Northcutt, Mrs. Levi Pennington, 
Mrs. James Pennington, Mrs. Tom 
Percival, Mrs. Bryan Rector^Mrs. 
John Sleet, Mrs. Wm. Soden, Mrs. 
Ralph Stephens, Mrs. Dave Vall- 
indingham, Mrs. Lula Vest, Mrs. 
Lawrence Wilson and Mrs. Jessie 
Wilson. 



Forest S. Thompson, Proprietor 
of The Mutual Realty Company, 
Wiliamstown, reports the sale of 
Alen and Mrs. Kemper Piner's 
farm to Robert Wagner and wife 
of Falmouth, R. 2 for $4,700. 

This is an excellent and well 
improve farm located near Flings- 
ville, Grant County. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wagner plan to 
move to their new purchase in 
the near future. 



Greenfield,, Ind., Jan. 23— Mrs. 
Martha W. Wilson, one of the few 
surviving classmates of __Jajnes 
Whitcomb Riley, died recently at 
the home of her son, Edwin Wil- 
son. She was 93 years old. 

Mrs. Wilson, a charter member 
of the Order of Eastern Star, at- 
tended classes here with the Hoo- 
sier poet. 

Shewas awarded a 50-year 
membership pin this year by the 
OES. Mrs. Wilson was born in 
Kentucky, but had lived here 
most of her life. She was a mem- 
ber of the Methodist church, 
where funeral services were held. 
Survivors are two sons, three 
grandchildren and three great- 
grandchildren. — Indianapolis Star. 

Mrs. Wilson was the aunt of 
Mr. Berry Johnson of Walton. 



Mrs. J. F. Jockey is assisting 
Mrs. Bruce Franks in her store, 
"The Town & Country Shop". 



Subscriptions for the first week 
of the Fourth War Loan Drive in 
Boone County ending last Satur- 
day night amounted to $71,675.75 
from 185 subscribers. This is a 
very good start on our guota of 
$500,000.00. All County Chairmen 
are requested to organize their 
workers and make an active cam- 
paign to see if a window sticker 
can be placed in the window of 
every home in Boone County. All 
subscribers should ask for one of 
these window stickers when mak- 
ing a subscription at your bank if 
the bank emloyees should overlook 
giving you one. This will show 
that you are doing your bit in this 
drive. 

One day last week a tenant far- 
mer sold his crop of tobacco for 
$700.00 and when he came to one 
of the banks in the county to cash 
his check he purchased $600.00 in 
Series E Bonds saying that he had 
purchased $200.00 in E bonds in 
previous drives and wsmted to do 
all he could in this Fourth War 
Loan Drive. He further stated that 
he had no close relatives in the 
army but that he would gladly 
make his Government a present of 
his $806'.00 in bonds if it would 
stop this war immediately and 
that he' felt the more bonds we 
buy the quicker this war will end 
and that he expected to put every 
dollar he could possibly spare into 
War Bonds. These War Bonds 
purchased by this man is practi- 
cally all the wealth he possesses. 
If every one was as patriotic and 
loyal to his country as is this man 
our quota would be reached with- 
out aViy trouble and within a short 
time. How many more citizens in 
Boone County have" we" like this? 

The Drive closes February 15th 
but please do not wait for the last 
week to enter your subscripttions. 
Try to get more than half the 
quota before February 1st. The 
2'*%, 2HW and the %% bonds are 
dated February 1st and you should 
subscribe for these issues before 
February 1st, otherwise you will 
be required to pay the accured 
interest from February 1st on 
subscriptions made after that 
date. You should also subscribe 
for Series E. F and G before Feb- 
ruary 1st because all bonds of 
this series dated in January bears 
interest froni January 1st but you 
do not -Have to pay- this accured 
interest, EfhcTyou therefore gain a 
month's interest. Full steam ahead 
this week ! ! 



NOTICE— 



There will be services, both 
morning and evening at the Rich- 
wood Presbyterian Church, Sun- 
day, January 30th. 

Communion Services will be 
observed at 11 a. m. February 6th, 
conducted by Rev. E. N. Rock of 
Louisville, Ky. 



Golden Wedding Anniversary 

Mr. and Mrs. Nich Sabin enter- 
tained with a dinner Sunday at 
their home on W. Fourth Street, 
Covington in observance of the 
golden wedding anniversary of 
Mrs. Sabin's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Wm. Deatherage of Kenton, Ky. 

They have six children; Mrs. 
Lula Howard, Mr. Stewart Death- 
erage, Mrs. Mary Sabin, Miss 
Mollie Deatherage and two sons 
serving in the armed services: 
Henry Deatherage stationed in 
California and Pfc. Robert Death- 
erage somewhere in England: They 
also have ten grandchildren, two 
who are serving their country; 
Pyt. Samuel Howard stationed at 
Ft. Bragg, N. C. and Chief Petty 
Officer Malcolm Howard, some- 
where in he South Pacific. 

Guests who enjoyed the festive 
occassion were: Mrs. Margaret 
Judd, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Judd and 



Local Leaders 
Plan 1944 Farm 
Food Program 

The home food production pro- 
gram is one of the most important 
farm operations for 1944 accord- 
ing to H. R. Forkner, County 
Agent. Leaders from Homemakers 
clubs, Community Agricultural 
programs and other organizations 
will meet at Burlington on Wed- 
nesday, February 2nd to plan a 
more effective home food^pro- 
duction program for this year 

The home food production pro- 
gram will include not only the! family, Mr and Mrs. S. T. Howard" 



Local Leaders 
Plan Banner 4-H 
Organization 



production of better gardens and 
home meat, dairy and poultry 
products but the preservation and 
preparation of their products for 
the family table to the extent that 
every farm family will -have an 
abundance of highest quality. ol 
all the necessary nutritious foods. 
John S. Gardner, Field Agent in 
Garden crops from the College of 
Agriculture will be a guest speaker 
at the leaders meeting. He will be 
assisted by the local leaders " In 
making plans for the 1944 pro- 
gram. 



Mr. and Mrs. Espy Baily, Miss 
Mollie Boggs, Mrs. Ben Bockholt, 
Mrs. Georgia Cummins, Mrs. Robt. 
Siebenthaler, Mr. and Mrs. Robt. 
Boggs, Miss Hazel Boggs, Mrs. 
Burnette Owens, Miss Helen Cum- 
mins, Billy Sabin, Mr. and Mrs. 
Stewart Deatherage, Mr. Wm. 
Piner, Junior Boggs, Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard Howard, Flora Howard, 
Florence Howard, Mary Howard, 
James Howard, June Howard, 
Ross Howard, Herbert Werks and 
Norma Jean Werks, Master Sgt. 
Stanley Kacaba and Mrs. Kacaba. 



Special plans for a banner 4-H 
organization in 1944 were made 
by Boone County 4-H Leaders at 
Burlington on last Saturday ac- 
cording to H. R. Forkner, County 
Agent. Organization work of com- 
munity clubs will begin February 
1st with clubs organized in each of 
the high school and grade schools 
-in the county. Enrollment is ex- 
pected to equal the record enroll- 
ment of 575 members of last year. 

Project work of direct impor- 
tance to the war effort will re- 
ceive special attention this year. 
Members in addition to carrying 
war projects will be encouraged to> 
keep business records on their re-/' 
cords on their projects activities. 
A county wide 4-H Council and* 
Adult leaders advisory meeting 
will be held at Burlington on 
February 26th to assist in project 
plans. 

Leaders attending the Saturday 
conference were: D. H. Norrls, 
president of the 4-H and Utopia 
council, Hubert Baker, Walton; 
Mrs Albert Willis. Hebron; ■ Mr. 
and Mrs. R. V. Lents, Constance; 
Rachel Pottinger, Grant; Mrs. 
Vernon Pope, Burlington; J. C. 
Acree, Hamilton; Mary Hood 
Gillaspie, O. D. Perkinson, and E. 
E. Fish, Experiment Station, Lex- 
ington. 



■:. ''- - 



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„«***• 



Walton advertiser 



< 



Thursday, January 27, 1944 



WEEKLY NEWS ANALYSIS 



Red Army Launches 'Bloodiest Drive' 
To Break Strong Nazi Defense Lines; 
Indian Tribes Aid in Arawe Offensive; 
Government Relinquishes Rail Control 

(EDITOR'S NOTE-. When opinions art exorcised In these column*, they are those of 

Western Newspaper Union's news analysis and not necessarily of this newspaper.) 

u " Released by, Western Newspaper Union. _^_________ 





Home to Yanks Protected overhead by sandbags and shell cases, 

this dugout on Italian battlefront is home, sweet home to these Yanks. 



RUSSIA: 
Baltic Drive 

Massing 250,000 men along a 250- 
mile stretth, the Russians launched 
a new offensive below Leningrad in 
the north, 70 miles from the Latvian 
border. In the initial fighting, the 
Reds cut across a railroad ' supply 
line, and also pushed toward the 
big Nazi base of Novgorod. 

To the south, Gen, Nicholas Va- 
tutin's First Ukrainian army drove 
40 miles within prewar Poland, while 
in the province of White Russia, 
the Reds gained in heavy- fighting 
over the frozen wastes of the vast 
Pripet marshes. On the southern 
front, stiff German defenses pre- 
vented a break-through to the Black 
sea Rumanian region. 

Polish Boundary 

Following Russia's suggestion that 
discussions for settlement of the 
Polish boundary dispute be based 
upon the so-called "Curzon line" 
awarding the provinces of White 
Russia and the western Ukraine to 
the Soviet Union, the Polish govern- 
ment-in-exile answered by asking 
-that the U. S. and Britain mediate 
the question. 

Russia took none too kindly to the 
idea, claiming that by asking the 
U. S. and Britain to intervene the 
Poles rejected the "Curzon line" as 
a basis for negotiation. Violently 
opposed to the present Polish gov- 
ernment-in-exile the Russians de- 
clared discussions with the present 
Polish government-in-exile were vir- 
tually impossible unless it was re- 
vised, with Communists included in 
.a new setup. 



Peace Talks 

Russia's unofficial report that two 
prominent British statesmen had 
met with German Foreign Minister 
von Ribbentrop in Spain to discuss 
a separate peace were vigorously 
denied in London. 

In London, it was pointed out that 
.the Von Ribbentrop story apparent- 
ly was an amplification of a rumor 
that has been widely spread since 
the Churchill-Eden conferences in 
Egypt, but was not taken seriously 
by other sources. 

SOUTHWEST PACIFIC: 
Surprise Promised 

Made up of Indians from 20 tribes 
trained in jungle warfare in Pana- 
ma, units of Lieut. Gen. Walter 
Krueger's Sixth army plowed for- 
ward at Arawe in southwestern New 
Britain,. as JJ, S. bombers continued 
hammering the big Jap supply base 
of Rabaul, to the northeast. 

Although U. S. advances on New 
Britain were slow, they were defi- 
nitely containing Jap forces that 
might be employed in the more vital 
area to the east. Speaking from 
Southwest Pacific headquarters. 
Rear Adm. Robert B. Carney said: 
"Rabaul and Kavieng are next on 
our list, but our method of taking 
them won't be. In accordance with 
any familiar pattern . . . Just how 
we will do it will be something the 
enemy least expects . . ." 

Indicative of the scale of U. S. air 
attacks on the big base of Rabaul 
which acts as a feeder point for Jap 
barges • supplying 'the New Britain, 
New Guinea and Solomons area, the 
Tokyo radio admitted the sinking of 
several ships in the' harbor after a 
raid of 200 American planes. 



RAILROADS: 
Back to OvCners 

Following the termination of strike 
threats with the settlement of the 
unions' wage disputes, the war de- 
partment returned the railroads to 
private ownership. 
. The action was taken after 1,150,- 
000 members of the non-operating 
unions were granted wage boosts 
of from 9 to 11 cents an hour, with 
extra payments for time over 40, 
hours making up part of the in- 
crease. Employees receiving less 
than 47 cents an hour will get the* 
11-cent raise, with those over 57 
cents granted 9 cents. 

Previously, 350,000 members of the 
operating unions had been awarded 
a 9-cents-an-hour boost. 

EUROPE: 
Road to Rome 

From their positions on the moun- 
tain slopes, U. S. and French troops 
looked down on the defenses of the 
Nazi stronghold of Casslno, guard- 
ing the long road to Rome. From 
Cassino, the broad plain running 
northward lends itself to armored 
warfare instead of the tedious, up- 
hill mountain fighting of recent 
months. 

As U. S. and French forces bore 
down on the tangled barbed wire, 
concrete emplacements and deep 
gun pits making up the Nazi defense 
system around Cassino, swirling rain 
and snow held up the British Eighth 
army's advance on the other end 
of the front.- 

Across the Adriatic in Jugoslavia, 
guerrillas of Josif ("Tito") Broz 
continued to harass German troop 
movements throughout the country, 
considered as a possible invasion 
site. 

POLITICS: 

Strange Letter 

Grumpy old Secretary of the In- 
terior Harold L. Ickes was brought 
into the case of the mysterious let- 
ter, produced by C. Nelson Sparks 
and allegedly written by Harry Hop- 
kins, and purporting to show that the 
latter as the President's No. 1 ad- 
viser is in close contact with Re- 
publican Wendell Willkie. 

Sen. William Langer (N. D.) dis- 
played photostatic copies of letters 
allegedly written by one of Ickes' 



Washington, D. O. 
PLENTY OF TRAINED PILOTS 

General Arnold did not say so in 
his report to the secretary of war, 
but the tremendous job of expand- 
ing air forces personnel is almost 
finished. He might have penned a 
little footno.te, saying, "We have pi- 
lots running out of our ears." 

No cadet training bases have been 
closed as yet, but the army will 
close approximately one dozen 
schools for training pilots between 
now «nd April. Air forces officials 
find that the elaborate program has 
now produced enough competent 
navigators and pilots to finish the 
job in both theaters of war. 

The tip-off to this is found in re- 
cent changes in policy of the trans- 
port command. 

Army transport command, which 
does non-combat flying all over the 
world, has always preferred to take 
pilots from the open market, usu- 
ally from the airlines. These pilots 
are specially trained in safe, effi- 
cient transport flying, as distin- 
guished from the combat type of 
training in the army air forces. 

Recently, however, transport com- 
mand has been forbidden to take on 
civilian pilots, and has been forced 
t6 accept combat - trained pilots 
from the air forces. - 

• • • 

MIRACLE WORKERS 

Miracles happen, even* in Wash- 
ington. FarrW Security administra- 
tion, heir to all the grief of Rex 
Tugwell, arjd long confined to the 
Capitol Hill dog house, is now 
emerging into the warm sunlight of 
congressional favor. A simple mat- 
ter of southern friendship did it. 

The miracle resulted from the 
fact that Frank Hancock and Harold 
Cooley were a couple of congress- 
men from North Carolina. Hancock, 
now out of congress, has just been 
appointed head of Farm Security. 
Hence, Congressman Cooley, for- 
merly FSA's deadliest critic, is now 
a supporter and friend. 

All during the past year, FSA 
operated on a shoestring. Its funds 
were cut, and congress frowned on 
almost everything it tried to do. 
But now, a report of a house agri- 
culture subcommittee which Cooley 
heads is about to give FSA a clean 
bill of health and recommend that 



Washington Digest; 



National Service Act Is 
Answer to War Disputes 

'Too Many Cooks' Root of Labor Disputes; 

Pressure Groups, Individuals Unwilling 

To Lay Aside Financial Desires. 




By BAUKHAGE 

News Analyst and Commentator. 



WNC Service, Union Trust Building, 
Washington, D. C. 

Why did the President order the 
army to take over the railroads? 

You can get seven reasons from 
•even different presidential advisors. 

I won't repeat them. I will name 
three. 

First, the epitome of those the po- 
litically minded probably gave; it 
will be a good thing for 1944. That 
is the sum total of a number of con- 
clusions of the master minds who 
are advising concerning the political 
campaign which is ahead of us. 

There are two other reasons which 
some of the time-hardened officials 
in Washington offer (aside from the 
threat, real or fancied, to the war ef- 
fort). These officials let the political 
stream flow over them. They are 
more interested in getting the par- 
ticular job assigned to them done 
than figuring out its political effects. 
Needless to say, they belong to that 
large, conscientious army which 
most people outside of Washington 
forget exists, an army of "people 
wise or unwise in their judgments 
but beholden to no political party 
for their positions. 

These are the two probable rea- 
sons they offered; first: 

The roads were seized as a threat 
against other industrialists who 
migbf'make trouble in accepting 
terms of future labor wage deci- 
sions, such demands for increases 
which can't be easily dodged (per- 
haps just demands, perhaps not, 
depending on who holds the scales). 

The second reason offered is this: 

Simply because many of the Pres- 
ident's present labor advisors have 
bad little or no experience in labor 
relations, in the methods of labor 
leaders. 

Misunderstanding 

There are a number of signs which 



it be continued as a permanent mi 8 ht P oint to reason one as the one 

which, turned the scales, but, like 
most of the other motivating forces 




Left to right: Ickes and Hopkins 

deputies to Sparks, claiming that 
the secretary of the interior was in 
possession of Hopkins' original let- 
ter to a prospective Democratic sen- 
atorial candidate in Texas, promis- 
ing him support from Willkie forces 
in the primary election. 

Ickes' alleged involvement in the 
case came' as a government attorney 
branded the Hopkins letter a forgery. 
Following- SenatoftLanger's action,- 
Ickes suspended his deputy and said: 
"I don't know who will ultimately 
turn out to be the villain . . . but it 
will not be 1." 



PEOPLE IN THE NEWS 



Good Reader 

- Somewhere in the South Pacific, 
a native kept one ear cocked while 
marines argued over the height of 
the Empire* State building. 

Finally, the native piped up: "No 
one right," he said. "Empire State 
building 1.250 feet high." 

"How do you know?" the marines 
asked. 

"Just good reader," the native an- 
swered. 



X-Ray Tells Secret 

When 3 playmates brought 10- 
year-old Johnny Wilm of Springfield, 
111., home with a wound in bis ab- 
domen, they' said he had fallen on 
a pile of cinders. 

But when little Johnny's fever had 
failed to subside X-rays showed a 
bullet lodged near his spine. Then, 
he confessed having been shot by 
one of his playmates during a "Com- 
mando" raid. 



agency. 

The report will not whitewash Mr. 
Tugwell or any of his works. In 
fact, it will sharply criticize all the 
old resettlement projects (already 
in process of liquidation). But it will 
give strong approval to two other 
FSA programs— rehabilitation and 
tenant purchase. 

Also, there will be a proposal for 
combining the lending programs of 
Farm Security with two types of 
Farm Credit administration loans, 
with a new corporation to handle the 
joint lending activity. 

• • » 

EXIT BOMBSIGHT 

There is every indication that the 
U. S. bombing to which the Japs 
will be subjected in 1944 will be 
without benefit of bombsight. 

The Norden bombsight has been 
publicized as the great secret ap- 
pliance which will help us win the 
war. It has been highly successful 
in the European theater, but in the 
Pacific it has actually become ex- 
cess baggage. 

Supply officers in Washington are 
still assigning bombsights to planes 
for Pacific action, but fliers are urg- 
ing that the device be left at home. 
They have found that the most suc- 
cessful air attack in the Pacific is 
the low-level tree-top bombing, in 
which medium bombers sweep in on 
the target and let the bombs drop 
when they are so close they can't 
miss. This is better than any pre- 
cision instrument ever invented. 

Also, it is less dangerous than 
high-altitude bombing. -Coming in 
low, the planes avoid detection by 
the enemy, whereas the high-alti- 
tude planes are caught both by in- 
struments and vision. 

The tree-top flying requires great- 
er pilot skill, also the use of de- 
layed-action bombs so that the plane 
can get away from the target before 
it blows up under the plane. 

This is the kind of work that was- 
done in the famous battle of the 
Bismarck sea, in which every Jap 
ship was destroyed. It was also how 
the Nazis sneaked up on Bori and 

wreaked havoc with Allied shipping. 

• • • 

MERRY-GO-ROUND 

ft The budget bureau several times 
has offered Cordell Hull,, all the 
money he needs for the state de- 
partment if he will only clean house 
and get in sor ^good men. 
C. The A. F. L. executive commit- 
tee will finally vote John L. Lewis' 
mine workers into the A. F. L. at 
this month's meeting in Florida. 
C. Harold Ickes and Henry Wallace, 
who didn't love each other too much 
when Wallace was secretary of agri- 
culture, have made up. Jesse Jones 
(not love for him) brought them to- 
gether. ,„ 

H Instead of cutting down red tape, 
the war'department is increasing it. 
It opened the new year by requiring 
reception clerks at all entrances of 
the giant Pentagon building to ask 
no less than 14 questions of each vis- 
itor, and write down all answers on 
a pink, blue or yellow filing card. 
Guess the army thinks we are losing 
the war, not winning it. 



in many of the recent labor deci 
■ions, they spring from the same 
soil as does reason two: misunder- 
standing of the methods of labor 
leaders. 

You will recall that William 
Green, A. F. of L. chieftain, when 
he made what since seems to have 
been an ill-starred attack on the 
Marshall statement that threats of 
strikes might prolong the war, stat- 
ed flatly that the railroad unions had 
never intended to strike. 

That statement isn't questioned in 
spite of the angry denials of the 
railroad union leaders. It is what 
you heard in every railroad office 
from every old time councilor and 
advisor in Washington before the 
roads were taken over. 

Unfortunately, the whole situation 
is reminiscent of the conversation 
concerning the dog. The dog 
growled. The owner said, "Don't 
be frightened, I know he won't bite 
you." "But." replied his friend, 
"does the dog know it?" 

You see the friend had no under- 
standing of dogs. 

If you had slipped into the White 
House on a certain day not long 
before the deadline for the strike 
call of the so-called recalcitrant un- 
ions (enginemen and firemen, and 
conductors) had been reached, you 
too might have been alarmed. The 
union representatives (I am told) 
were making a noise very much like 
a dog that is going to bite. 

Now the old timers were used to 
the noise. But the two gentlemen 
upon whom the President leans for 
advice in matters of' stabilization 
involving wage and price boosts, 
Messrs. Byrnes and Vinson, were 
not accustomed to the sound. They 
did not know that a labor leader's 
bark is often' worse than his bite. 

("There never was the faintest 
possibility of an actual walkout on 
the nation's railroads." — William 
Green.) 

Messrs. Byrnes and Vinson be- 
lieved what they heard and it was 
plenty. 

That experience, I think I can 
say, is. authentic. The labor lead- 
ers emphatically and enthusiastical- 
ly threatened, Messrs. Vinson and 
Byrnes took the warning growl for 
a real threat. Others of the Presi- 
dent's council were convinced that 
there was excuse enough to do 
something which they thought would 
be advantageous for political rea- 
sons. 



And so finally, the man with the 
long cigarette holder, just back from 
the world battlefronts where "so- 
much-per-hour-per-day" wasn't the 
argument, but "so-manjr-lives-per- 
hour" was, where world maps were 
being re-drawn, where America's at- 
titude and action was about to re- 
write history, became a little im- 
patient. 

The Action Date 

"We have come to the action 
date," said the President, "we have 
been talking here since Sunday. If 
you can't take action by agreement, 
I will have to take action by my- 
self." 

He took it and he took the rail- 
roads. To say that Washington was 
not surprised would be to misjudge 
Washington. 

The root of the whole trouble in 
this and all the labor "disputes has 
been that there were too many 
cooks. The trouble with the confus- 
ing statements which come out of 
Washington is that there are too 
many cooks. And yet, we have that 
paradox that when there are too 
many people handling war prob- 
lems, the only cure so far has been 
to substitute too few— to pass the 
buck to one man— the President. The 
answer to that is that one man 
simply cannot do it all. 

The war is too far away from us. 
We cannot lay aside our personal 
and natural desire to make as much 
money out of it as the next fellow. 

This has gone on from the begin- 
ning—employer, making his profits, 
essential labor demanding and get- 
ting his high wages, the farmer, his 
incentive, and then those who foP 
low after, shouting,, "you did it for 
them, do it for me!" 

Not one group is blameless, only 
those who have been unable to bring 
pressure, hesitated to do so. And, 
for the most part, each group sin- 
cerely believing that it was getting 
no more than its just due, the rest 
were the profiteers, the chiselers. 

The solution? 

At this writing, a National Service 
Act that will order who does what 
and for how much— just as it is in 
the army. 





f~XF COURSE having guests fete 
^ .day means that you'll have to 
be lucky to have enough red points 
to feed them but you don't need 
any points at all to have these 



*Experf Apparently Had 
Efficiency on the Run 



An Abiding Peace- 
Common Sense Treatment 

Books on the postwar world can 
almost be described as the only 
commodity of which there t is now 
surplus production, but this' is one 
—"Towards an Abiding Peace"— that 
can be taken seriously. R. M. Mac- 
Iver, professor in Columbia univer- 
sity, for one thing writes a clear, 
simple unprofessorial language, say- 
ing what he means directly and with- 
out qualifications. 

He is for a world order but is too 
practical to believe you can have 
it by just writing a world constitu- 
tion. He wants a temporary peace 
wbich in a way carries on from the 
war alliance, and then a second 
stage in which we move to real in- 
ternational control. Furthermore, 
he thinks that sooner, or later our 
present enemies must be taken in 
unless we are going to let the third 
World war slowly fester. 

An international order is an inter- 
national order to Mr. Maclver. 

There are no weasel words. 

Mr. Maclver has worked out his 
plans in some detail. There is a lot 
of common sense in "Towards an 
Abiding Peace"— on a subject on 
which a good deal of pretentious 
philosophizing is being done. 



Desirous of bucking up business, 
the proprietor of a large store en- 
gaged »an "efficiency expert," 
whose chief delight was changing 
the departments aroujud. 

nOne day a section would be on 
the top floor of the building; the 
next day it would be in the base- 
ment or where the restaurant used 
to be. 

After three weeks of this an old 
lady approached a worried-looking 
floor clerk and asked if he could 
tell her where the chinaware de- 
partment was. 

"No, ma'am, I cannot," he re- 
plied, wearily; "but if you'll stand 
here for a few minutes, I'm sure 
you'll see it go by." 



seven handsome designs to em- 
broider on your guest towels I Do 
the lovely cross stitch iri your 
spare time in the afternoons — 
while you are mentally planning; 
the next day's menus. Each de- 
sign is about 4% by 5 inches. 
• • • 

To obtain seven transfer designs for tho 
Lucky Seven Towels (Pattern No. 5637)1 
color chart for working, send 16 cents In 
coin, your name and address and the 
pattern number. 

Due to an unusually large demand and 
current war conditions, slightly more Ume 
is required in filling orders for a few of 
the most popular pattern numbers. 

Send your order to: 

HOME NEEDLEWORK 

530 South Wells St. Chicago. 



TRY OVERNIGHT CARE 
FOR MISERABLE COLDS- 

the way grandma did. She used mutton 
suet she medicated herself to relieve 
colds' coughing and muscle aches. Now 
mothers just rub on Penetro. Has base 
containing old reliable mutton suet, with 
modern scientific medication- added. 
25c, double supply 3So. Got Penetro. 



Heavy Stuff 

"Candy" in India is a 500-pound 
weight. 



HARSH LAXATIVES 
UNNECESSARY? 

Millions Find Simple Fresh 
Fruit Drink Gives Them All 
the Laxative Aid They Need 

Don't form the habit of depend- 
ing on harsh, griping laxatives 
until you've tried this easy, health- 
ful way millions now use to keep 
regular. 

It's fresh lemon juice and water 
taken first thing in the morning— 

J'ust as soon as you get up. The 
uice of one Sunkist Lemon in • 
glass of water. Taken thus, on aa 
empty stomach, it stimulates 
normal bowel action, day after 
day, for most people. * 

And lemons are actively good 
for you. They're among the richest 
sources of Vitamin C, which com- 
bats fatigue, helps resist colds and 
infections. They supply vitamins 
B, and P, aid digestion and help ■ 
alkalinize the system. 

Try this grand wake-up drink 
10 mornings. See if it doesn't help 
you! Use California Sunkist 
Lemons. 





TRAD 



Smith Bros, has served the public since 1847. 
In that period America has fought five wars. 
Only during wartime has there ever been any 
shortage of Smith Bros. Cough Drops. Our 
production now is war-reduced but we'se dis- 
tributing it fairly to all. Still only 54. A nickel 
checks that tickle! 

SMITH BROS. COUGH DROPS 

• LACK OR MENTHOl-5* 




Bond-Selling Plan 

Rep. Richard P. Gale of Minne- 
sota has a plan for increasing bond 
sales to individual citizens— the sales 
( which it is most important to make. 
He thinks it is a cheap and easy 
way for the government to increase 
sales and interest in sales on the 
part of the average man. Senator 
Guffey offered a similar plan. 

Periodically, at intervals not 
greater than three months, he would 
have the treasury make a drawing. 
And the person holding the winning 
number— he would be a bondholder, 
of course, would get a prize of from 
a hundred to 25 thousand dollars. 

It wouldn't" be a lottery because 
nobody could lose — you would have 
your bond for the money you invest- 
ed and your bond would be your 
ticket. 



Shoulder a Gun or the Cost of One 

By Buying United States War Bonds 




BRIEFS 



by Baukhage 



Nicaragua and Costa Rica arc 
rapidly expanding their balsa crops 
to keep up with current war de- 
mands and in anticipation of wood's 
Important role in postwar aviation. 
• • • 

The use of tin to preserve food 
safely in metal containers was first 
exploited by Napoleon's engineers 
preparatory to his Invasion of Rus- 



Stamp out turnover— stay on the 
Job— and finish the Job! That should 
be every American's creed. 

• • • 

All honorably discharged mem- 
bers of the armed forces— both men 
and women— will be assisted in ev- 
ery way possible to find a Job to 
their liking, according to Paul V. 
McNutt, chairman of the War Man- 
power commission. 



YOU BET yott show it when those 
cruel pains shoot through arms, 
neck, back or legs. Do something. 
Rub on soretone Liniment. Get 
the blessed relief of Soretone'a 
cold heat action. Quickly Soretone 
acts to: 

1. Dilate surface capillary blood 
vessels. 

2. Cheek muscular cramps, 

3. Enhance local circulation. 

4. Help reduce local swelling. 

Developed by the famous McKes- 
son Laboratories, Soretone is a 
unique formula. Soretone contains 
methyl salicylate, a most effective 
pain-relieving agent. For fastest ac- 
tion, let dry, rub in again. There's 
only one Soretone— insist on it for 
Soretone results. SO*. Big, long* 
listing bottle, $1. ., 



MONEY BACK - 

IF SORFTONi Onf^N'T WSFY 



"ant. McKesson make* UP 



SORETONE 

soothes fast with 

COLD HEAT* 
ACTION 

in casts of 

MUSCULAR LUMBAGO 
OR BACKACHE 

Sua U MJfM ar uawura ' 

MUSCULAR PAINS 

di»t*Mld< 

SORE MUSCLES 

du# to fttmrk 

[MINOR SPRAINS 



I 



I *5gg. ,e 



Mid. ruba- 

iti In M» 

too* act ion boat to Inrruw 

Uw lUMrScUl ilippr/ at 

blood to tha ant and ndota 

— | » ilotrin. mom nt Virata. 



■ 



nm 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



COMMISSIONERS SALE 



Court), upon a credit of 6 and 12 



Commonwealth of Kentucky, 

Boone Circuit Court, 

C. C. Hopperton, et al., Plaintiff 

Versus:- Notice of Sale 

Callle Hoperton Beach et al., 
Defendant. 

By virtue of a judgement and 
order of sale of the Boonq Circuit 
Court rendered at the December 
Term thereof 1943, in the above 
cause, I shall proceed to offer for 
sale on the premises, in Walton, 
Kentucky to the highest bidder, at, 
public auction on Monday, the 7th 
day of February 1944 at 1:00 
O'clock P. M. (Central War Time) 
or thereabout (being the 1st day 
of the February Term of County 



Railway; thence North 3% W 72 
months, the following described feet, to a .stake; thence North 60 'i 
property to-wit: 

Parcel No. 1 A house and lot in 
Walton, Boone County, Kentucky, 
situated on the west side of the 
Covington & Lexington Turnpike 
road and bounded and described 
as follows: Beginning at a stake 
132 feet from a gate post which 
is on the line" between William 
Gillman's Line and Arnold's pro- 
perty running on a line with the 
edge of the Lexington and Cov- 
ington Turnpike S 29 '4 E 66 feet 
to a stake, corner wit W. H. 
Stamler's lot; thence wun Stam- 
ler's line S 60 %• W 229 feet pass- 
ing a 25 foot street at 160 x 165 
respectively to a stake 33 feet 
from the center of the L & N 



WOOD SHEET METAL HEATING STOVES 

Coal Heaters, Oakes and Warm Morning 
Stove Pipe and Elbows 



39 Inches High, 12-Inch Stay Field Fence 
4-Point Cattle Barb Wire 



John Deere Farm Machinery and DeLaval 
Milkers and Cream Separators. 

The Jansen Hdw. Co. 

108-110 Pike Street 
Co. 0910 -". Covington, Ky. 



E 399 feet passing a 25 foot street 
at 214 and 239 feet respectively 
to the beginning. Being the same 
property conveyed to Margaret 
(Maggie) Hopperton by Mattie V. 
Doubman, by deed dated August 
12, 1915, recorded in Deed Book 57 
page 60. of the Boone County Re- 
cords, at Burlington, Ky. 
. Parcel No. 2 A certain tract or 
parcel of land, lying and being in 
Boone County Kentucky, west of 
and adjoining the twon of Walton, 
and bounded thus; Beginning at 
a stone in a line of the right of 
way of the L & N Railroad, a cor- 
ner with Eli Conrad, thence with 
his line S. 61 W 12.80 chains to a 
corner with Harvey Roberts; 
thence with his line N 12^ W. 
21.65 chains to a stone; thence 
with a line of a passway N. 77% 
E 30 links to a stone; thence N. 
9'4 w. 1089 chains to a corner 
with 26 acre lot set apart to 
Annie Glenn; thence with a line 
of said lot N 75 H E 23.54 chains 
to a stone in a line of the afore- 
said railroad; thence with the 
line of the right of way of said 
railroad S 3 19-26 . . . 5.59 chains; 
S 1 E 2.57 chains, S 2 W 3.39 
chains, S 10 W 4.47 chains, S 14^ 
W 4.24 chains. S 18 W 3.28 chains, 
S 21% W 3.59 chains, S 23% W- 
2.03 chains to .the begjnjjing, con- 
taining 62.16 acres, more or less. 
Also a strip of land 60 feet wide 
on the west side of the L & N Ry. 
Co., right of way, running with 
said right of way to a street and 
being the* rear portion of a lot 
conveyed by the grantor, Robert 
Brown, to Lula Jones, which was 
reserved by said Brown as an 
Outlet. Being the same property 
conveyed to Maggie Hopperton by 
Julia E. West, by deed dated Jan- 
uary 1st, 1916, and recorded in 
Deed Book 57, page 317 of the 
aforesaid records. 



STOP^JHtNK! 



HOW MUCH 
IS YOUR 

FREEDOM 

WORTH? 






r 






y * if #&~ 



^ 



Back-tke Attack! 

fa WAR 

BONDS 

boy a plncho«fR« fo p,ovW» 



For the purchase price, the 

purchaser must execute bond, 

with approved surety; — bearing 

legal interest from the day of 

sale, until paid, and having the 

force and effect of a judgement. 

Bidders will be prepared to comply 

promptly with these terms. 

A. D. YELTON, 

Master Commissioner Boone 

Circuit Court 



WALTON METHODIST CHURCH 

Walton, Kentucky * 



CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Walton, Ky. 



Geo. S. Caroland, Minister 
Church School.:.... 10:00 a. m. 

Helen Ruth Gardiner, Supt. 
Worship, Lord's Supper 11:00 a. m. 
Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 



GOSHEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Finer, Kentucky 



4" WAR LOAM 



Mi"«^J3H*tD<>* lf - wide- 
ly a pUieholfW* fo provide 



gy^gg'^TCCE 



SOUTHEASTERN 



GREYHOUND LINES 



Cecil F. McKee, Pastor 

Services 2nd and 4th Sundays 
10:00 A. M. Sunday School. 
11:00 A. M. Church Service. 
6:00 P. M. Christian Youth 
Fellowship. 
7:30 P. M. Evening Service. 



UNION PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 

M. A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 

Sunday School, 11:00 a. m., E. 
W_T. . 

Morning Worship, 12:00 N., E. 
W. T. 

Evening Service, 8:30 p. m., 
E. W. T. 

Services every second and forth 
Sundays. 

INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST 
CHURCH 



W. E. Maners, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m 

B'. T. U 7:00 D. m 

Evangelist Services .... 8:00 p. m 
Prayer and Bible Study, 
Wednesday 8:00 p. m 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH 



Sunday School at 10:00 a. m. 
(CWT), Harry Rouse, Supt. 

Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m., 
(CWT). . 

B. T. U. at 7:00' p. m., (CWT). 

Evening Worship at 7:45 p. m., 
(CWT). 

Services each Sunday. You are 
cordially invited to worship with 
us 



Lady Nearly Choked 
While Lying In Bed- 
Due To Stomach Gas 



her 
and 
She 



One lady said a few days ago 
that she used to be afraid to go to 
bed at night. She was swollen with 
stomach gas, which always got 
worse when she went to bed, and 
the gas would rise up In 
throat after she lay down 
would nearly choke her. 
couldn't lie flat. Had to prop her- 
selfself up on pillows. Recently 
this lady got ERB-HELP and now 
says gas is gone, stomach feels 
fine, bowels are regular and she 
can go to bed and sleep soundly. 

ERB-HELP contains 12 Great 
Herbs; they cleanse bowels, clear 
gas from stomach, act on sluggish 
liver arid kidneys. Miserable peo 
pie soon feel different all over. So 
don't go on suffering! Get ERB- 
HELP. Jones Drug Store. 



#7 FIRST 

»GN( 



c 



" use 666 



•66 TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DROPS 



3 >Q 



EYESTRAIN 

Are you conscious of a 
strain when you read fine 
print* - 

Perhaps you need glasses. 
Consult us today. 

LJ.METZGER 

Optometrist Opticlaa 

SSI Madison Ave. 

Covlngtoa 

Serving Northern Kentucky 
With Comfortable Eyesight 






When In Covington 




at 

LANG'S CAFETERIA 

623-625 Madison Ave. 
Covington 



Rev. C. G. Bearing, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m, 

Morning Worship.: 11:00 a. m. 

Youth Fellowslhp 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Service 7:00 p. m. 



RICH WO OD PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 



NEW. BETHEL BAP. CHURCH 

Verona, Kentucky 



Rev. Shirley Spahr, Pastor 

Preaching services every 1st and 
3rd Sunday. 

Sunday School 10. a. m. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed 8 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

All times given Central War Time 



INDEPENDENCE CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 



Lee Doty, Minister 

Sunday School — 10:00 a. m. 

Worship and Communion — 
11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship — 8:00 p. m. 

You are cordially Invited to 
attend any and all services. 




Your Valentine Photo 

Keep your image close to him 
in the lonely hours on a far- 
away front — send your smiling 
Valentine Photograph, made in 
our modern studio. Come in 
today. 

SERVICE PHOTO 
STUDIO 

804 Madison Ave., Covington 

STUDIO HOURS: 

11 A. M. to 9 P. M. Dally 

Sundays, 1 to 5 P. M. 



M. A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 

Sunday School, 10:00 a. m. 
Morniru? Worship, 11:00 -a. m. 
Evening Worship, 7:00 p. m. 
Services every first and third 
Sundays. . I 



GLENCOE BAPTIST CHURCH 



Kev. w. T. Dunaway, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10, a. m., Al- 
bert Collins, Supt. 

Morning worship at 11 a. m. 

Evening worship at 7:15 p. m. 

Prayer meeting on Thursday 
at 7:30 p. m. 



Courtesy and Co-operation 

Haa enabled as t» become Increasingly valuable to Um 
Public upon whose patronage we depend. 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 

Member of Federal Deposit Dunranee Corporation. 



WE ARE NOW TAKING ORDERS FOR 
BABY CHICKS 

We Sell Dr. Salsbury's Poultry Remedies, Poultry 
Feeders, Water Founts, Etc* 

FUL-O-PEP FEED STORE 



512 PDXE STREET 

COVINGTON, 

KY. 



■tioi-wdi- PO'JLTPY 
HFALTH SI RVICT 



HEMLOCK 9168 

Open Sundays Till 

Noon 



HOUfTO 

Walton Perpetual Bldg. & Loan Assn. 

DIXIE STATE BANK BLOG. WALTON, KY. 

E. S. West, Sec'y A. M. Edwards. Pre*. 

SEMI-ANNUAL DIVIDENDS 




^ 




PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



Deposits Insured Under the Federal 
Deposit lusurance Corporation . . . 



HrVi 



lVING SOLD MY FARM AND RETIRED FROM FARMING, 
I AM MOVING TO THE CITY AND WILL SELL TO THE HIGH 
BIDDER, MIDWAY BETWEEN BRACHT & PINER ON ROUTE 
14, ON 



SAT., 



, AT 10:00 P. M., (E. W. T.) 

STOCK 
6 year old mare and 6 year old horse, good workers; 6 year old Jersey 
cow, will be fresh by day of sale, 4 years old; Jersey cow, will be fresh 
in February, 6yrs. old; Jersey cow, milking good; 2 ten month old 
Heifers; 1 O. I. C. Sow; 19 O. I. C. Shoats, weight 40 to 80 lbs.; 70 
Rhode Island Red Pullets, laying; 100 White Leghorn Hens, laying. 

TOOLS 
Double set work harness; 1 sled; good mowing machine; hay rake; 
disk harrow; land plow; hill side plow; laying off plow; 1 -horse 
cultivator; 1 -horse corn drill; 1100 tobacco sticks; some corn & hay; 
many small tools too numerous to mention and 2-3 shovel plows. 

FURNITURE 
White Table Top Oil Range, insulated oven, almost new; 3 Burner 
Cabinet Oil Stove, all white with oven; 2 Burner Oil Stove and Oven; 
large Sunbeam Heatrola; Wood Heater; 1 Coal Heater; 1 Coal Range, 
Gray & Ivory; 1 Portable Oil Heater; Library Table; Stand Table; 
Dining Table; Buffet; Cabinet Radio; Music Cabinet; three quarter 
Bed, complete; full size Bed; Day Bed and Pad; 2 Dressers, White 
Kitchen Cabinet; Table & 4 Chairs; Linoleum; Dishes; Fruit Jars and 
numerous small items. 

1936 Plymouth Sedan, Twin Horns and Good Paint. - 

TERMS— CASH 

LUNCH WILL BE SERVED ON GROUNDS 

FRANK W. JOHNSON 



OWNER 
HARRY F. JOHNSON, Auct., Phone Ind. 6196 



J. B. DOAN, Clerk 



* 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



(Established in 1914) 



THE KENTON-CAMPBELL COURIER — Established 1M7 
(Consolidated June 1, 1938) 



Entered as Second Class Matter January 1, 1916 
at the Post Office at Walton, Kentucky. 



MRS. J. R. WALLACE and WILLIAM W. JARRELL 
EDITORS and PUBLISHERS .— 



Foreign Advertisiag Representative: 

AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 



I! 



NATIONAL 6DITORIAI 

ASSOCIATION 




Notices and Cards of Thanks: 
15 words and less, 50 cents. Over 
15 words $1.00. ■ 

0mmmm - > ^~ *• — bbbssi ssssa ^^^ 

UNION 



We are very happy to see our 
good friend Mr. George Burkett 
out again. 

Mr. Marion Walton was visiting 
his daughter! Mrs. Clinton Jones^ 
and family one day last week. 

A letter was received last week 
by Mrs. Viola Friend from her 
youngest brother, Roy Stuart 
Denton I"c-s7'saying he had com- 
pleted the course in Gunnery 
Bchool at Gulfport, Miss., and has 
now arrived at" Treasure Island, 







W. E. TAIT, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 

Specializing In the 

correction and 

protection of 

EYESIGHT 

27 E. 7th St 

COVINGTON. KY. 

Hours 9:30 a. m. to 
5:30 p. m. 

Evenings by appointment 
Phone HE. 2088 



MEMBER 

FKTOCKY PRES! 
ASSOCIATION. 



San Francisco, Calif, from where 
he expects to be assigned to active 
sea duty soon. Two other brothers 
Cpl. Albert Denton, somewhere in 
Sicily and Cpl. Thomas Ed. Den- 
ton with the Medical Corps at 
Camp White, Oregon were also 
heard from recently. All were in 
high spirits and like we all, are 
hoping for an early victory and a 
World Peace. May God give them 
and all their, buddies the -oovrage 
and strength to carry on until 
this dream come true fee the 
whole world. , 

Mir. and Mrs. Bud Afterkirk and 
family have moved to the farm of 
Mrs. W. S. Bristow on Big Bone 
road. 

Mr. J. W. Doane and daughter, 
Nell Jean were visiting Mr. and 
Mrs. Clifford Fisk and family of 
Covington last Sunday. 

Miss Thelma Robinson* Miss 
Nell Jean Doane and Mrs. W. S. 
Friend were in Covington last 
Thursday as blood donors at Ken- 
ton County Blood Bank, but due 
to a cold the appointment of Mrs. 
Friend was canceled. 

Mrs. Charley Hedges and family 
were the Saturday evening guests 
of her brother, Bob Feldhaus and 
family of Erlanger. The many 
friend of their son George Feld- 
haus will be glad to learn that his 
leg fracture is improving and the 
cast has been removed. George is 
a fine boy and is bright and 
cheerful after much suffering and 



months of confinement to his bed 
from injuries received in an auto 
a c ci de nt: Ma y- G o d s pee d his co m - 
plete recovery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Branon of 
Cincinnati were calling on the W. 
S. Friends Sunday afternoon. 
They have bought the C. M. 
Emral farm and hope to move out 
soon. 

Deepest sympathy is extended 
Mr. and Mrs. Oliver in the loss of 
their infant son. God alone under- 
stands such things and through 
Him may they fine comfort and 
solace in this dark hour. 



In Lee county, Marcus Calmes 
marketed 3,146 pounds of tobacco 
grown on 1.9 acres. 



WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Walton, Ky. 



Bible School 10:00 a. m 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m 

B. T. U 6:30 p. m 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer K\eeting, Wed., 7:30 p. m. 



m ftiilCKI tflflA WAR BONOS 



WAR LOAN 



To the People 
of this Community 

THINK IT OVER 

How about doing a little cold 
turkey thinking after you lay 
aside this newspaper tonight? 

You've got a good job. The 
chances ar e there is someone 
else in your 
family, per- 
haps two or 
three, work- 
ing. Your 
son or your 
brother — 
may be away 
at war. 
This war 
•w must end 

sometime. Your whole family, 
your neighbors, are praying it 
ends soon and those fighting boys 
of yours will come home safely. 
But will you be ready for 
whatever happens when peace 
comes? Will you have some- 
thing laid away? We're all hop- 
ing there'll be jobs '"aplenty, jobs 
which mean making something 
for somebody's happiness and 
not" for somebody's sorrow. 
That's where your War Bonds 
come into the picture.' Sure, 
Americans own billions of dol- 
lars of War Bonds now; and be- 
fore this 4th War Loan ends 
they will have put away billions 
more. But how about you? 
You're the one that counts. The 
bigger the pile of War Bonds 
you have when peace comes, the 
bigger chance you'll have tq slip 
right into the post-war world 
'you're dreaming about tonight. 
So "Let's All Back the Attack." 
THE EDITOR. 




Dedicated To My Son — 

Pvt. Albert A. Hunt 

Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

"OUR SON" 



'Tis twenty-one years since that wonderful day 
When God blessed our home with a Son, 
How happy we were, it is useless to say 

- For life in our home had really begun; 

' That dear little one entrusted taour care 
So small, and precious and sweet 
Made us thank our God as we knelt in prayer, 
•For we loved him from his head to his feet. 

We could see him grow a little each day 

Like a tiny bud, unfolding in bloom, 

Those first little steps, and the new words he'd say 

Are sweet memories yet as we sit in our room. 

The time seemed so short for his baby days 

For at six he started to school, 

We tried hard to teach him it really pays 

To always be led by the golden rule. 

The years flew by so swiftly, •itHseemed 

With it's trials and troubles and cares, 

But at last the day came, of which we had dreamed 

For we had met it all with our prayers; 

The day of Graduation was finally here 

In a way it really seemed sad 

For we realized the time was drawing near 

When our Son would leave Mother and Dad. 

But we tried in those years to raise him right 

To "love ms'Church and "his God 

To he thankful for all of his blessings each night 

And be careful on the road which he trod. 

He had many sick spells in younger years 

Serious operations were made, 

But we're drawn close to God when we are in tears 

And God gave him health, for which we had prayed. 

The time finally came, when our Son was of age 

A time for which all boys have dreamed, 

The years had flown by like turning a page 

For we just didn't realize, it seemed; 

But our Nation was in a terrible War 

And we knew he would have to go, 

It grieved our hearts when he was sent so far 

But we're proud he wouldn't say "NO", - .r:~<-—- "■'."*"""' 




Of course we are lonesome and grieved each day 

But there are other parents the same; 

We are thankful we each are priviledged to pray 

And even our Sons can call on God's name; 

We pray God to protect them, near and far 

And lead and guide them each day, 

"May we soon have a Lasting Peace from this ( War 

May our Sons soon come Home," we pray. 

—Mrs. A. T. Hunt 



IVUaty cut fcuy With 

war mini IIS 

Holy Stone 

Cleanliness is the.flrst order of ev- 
ery American soldier and sailor and 
the United States Government 
spends millions upon millions of dol- 
lars to keep our .fighting men as 
clean and as healthy as circum- 
stances will permit 



CONCORD 



Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Chapman 
and family entertained Saturday 
night for Rev. G. N. Smith and 
iGlen Webster, wife and baby from 
Falmouth, Sunday for dinner Rev. 
Smith and Mrs. Emma Willeford. 
Afternoon callers were Mr. and 
Mrs. Herbert King and daughter- 
in-law, Mrs. Helen King of 
^Latonia; Mrs. O. J. Struve and 1 
boys, of Walton and Mr. and Mrs. 
Mannual and family. 

We are glad to report Mrs. 
Russel Webster improving. 

Mr. Hiram English of Walton 
visited relatives and, friends here 
Sunday. 



Men a/e (/yin<j...afe yo< 



IF YOU'RE inclined to say, "I can't 
afford any mora Bonds," just take 
another look at the casualty lists. 

At least $100 extra in Bonds — over 
and above your regular buying — is 
needed as your part in putting over 




the Fourth War Loan. At least $100, 
$200, $300, or $500 if you can possibly 
■crape it up. 

Look at those grim lists in tpday's 
paper. Buy your Bonds while the 
names are still fresh in your mind. 



£%^ BACK THE ATTACK! 




Sponsored By ; — 

Model Food Store Roberts Grocery 

___. ' ^ Mann's Grocery — 

B. F. Elliott Hardware & Dept. Store 



U. S. WAR DEPARTMENT 

CERTIFICATE OF 

AUTHORITY A G 095. 

EXPIRES AUG. 10, 1945. 



USEFUL 

NEEDS 

FOR 

SERVICE 

MEN 

Furlough Bags 
Kit Bag* 

Roll Kits, Apron Kits 
Shoe Shine Kits 
Sewing Kits 
Money Belts 
Garrison Caps 
Overseas Caps 
Ties, Belts, Sweaters 
Chevrons, Collar Ensignia 
Shoulder Patches 
Service Ribbons 
Garrison Belts 



Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Hughes 
spent the week-end in Indiana 
visiting his brother Hubble Hughes 
and family. 

Pfc. William C. Glacken who is 
stationed at Hamilton Field, Calif, 
is enjoying a furlough with his 
wife, Mrs. AliceGlacken and his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. 
Glacken of Verona. 

Mrs. W. N. Robinson has been 
in with the flu, but is some beter 
now, we missed her from church. 

Mr. Everett Webster was a din- 
ner guest at Ross .Chapman's 
Thursday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Lucas are 
moving to Walton this week. We 
will miss these folk from our 
midst, we hope her health im- 
proves after they get moved. 



Revival Meeting 

.Rev. W. W. King of Ashland, 
Ky., Evangelist Pastor for a num- 
ber of years, is holding Revival 
meetings each evening at 7:30 at 
the Church of God, Sunset Ave., 
Erlanger, Ky. These meetings be- 
gan" Sunday night, January 23rd 
and will continue through Jan- 
uary 30th. 

Come, hear the Old Fashion 
Gospel Preaching each evining. 



WALTON-VERONA HIGH 
SCHOOL NEWS 



We want to thank everyone who 
contributed to the paper drive, 
also Mr. Allen Gaines, of the 
Walton Lumber Co. for the use of 
his truck to collect the paper. 

The home-nursing class was 
completed Monday, January 24th, 
with the exam. The girls want to 
thank Miss Lowry for her work 
and services. 



EF-KO 
ARMY STORE 



508 Madison Avenue 



NEAR 
FIFTH 



Covington JSth 



%/ou Mutt Jfam 

Vitamins A and D 

You most have Vitamin A 
as an aid in protection against 
infections which are more 
likely to occur in the nose, 
throat, eyes, ears and sinuses, 
when there is a deficiency of 
this vitamin. 

You need Vitamin D to help 
the body make proper use of 
the calcium and phosphorus in 
your diet. 

If you are not getting 
enough of these two important 
vitamins, take a ONE-A-DAY 
brand Vitamin A and D Tab- 
let every day and insure your 
normal requirements. 




ONE A DAY 



"Swab the deck!" cries out a pet- 
ty officer and the men fall to with 
their "holy stone" equipment and 
in a short time everything is spick 
and span. 

Buy War Bonds and more War 
Bonds and you know that you are 
sharing in the effort that- wiH free 
the world from war lord domination. 

V. S. Treasury Dtparlmtnt 



BEAVER LICK 



Mrs. Eddie Bowen of Covington 
spent Sunday with her brother, 
Raymond Shields and family. 

Mrs. Margaret Beil is spending 
some time here with her daughter 
Mrs... William Brown. 

Mrs. William Souder of Coving- 
ton visited her parents Rev. and' 
Mrs. Godbey over the week-end. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Brown of 
Spring Valley, Ohio visited re- 
latives here Sunday. 

Mrs. William Brown has been 
seriously ill with pneumonia, but 
is much better now. £ 

Master Albert Wood Is much 
better after being ill for several 
days. 

J. W. Conley's car was damaged 
when he ran into the rear of 
another car during the heavy fog 
last Tuesday. 

Mrs. Jake Cleek was hostess to 
the New Haven Homemakers last 
Tuesday. About ten ladies were 
present and a very enjoyable 
meeting was held. Plans were 
completed for a bake sale to be 
held at Mrs. Ann "Conner's Drug 
Store at Florence, January 22. A 
number of the members plan to 
attend Farm & Home Week at 
Lexington next week. Februaiy 
15th is the date of the next meet- 
ing of the club. 



USED CARS-20 EAST FOURTH ST. 

Covington COlonial 3884 

1939 Hudson Coach . $675* 

1935 Ford 4-Door Sedan fl*B 

1941 Ford DeLuxe, all extras, 

18,000 miles $1075 

1937 Ford Coach $295 

1937 DeSota Sedan $375 

1940 DeSota Sedan, 7-passenger $1250 

1937 (Two) Studebaker Coupes $350 

1937 Oldsmobile Coach $375 

1937 Dodge Coach 1 $350 

1936 Cadillac $325 

1939 Hudson 4-door ■-■■ ...... $695 

1937 Ford Coupe _x. » $295 

1937 Chrysler Sedan ..... $295 

1939 Dodge 4-door Sedan $695 

1936 Packard Sedan $275 

1937 Packard Coupe ;„ $345 

1936 Chevrolet Sedan 1 . $245 

1938 Willys Sedan * $325 

. * 65 MORE FROM $60 UP 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 



A PENNY POST CARD WILL 
SAVE YOU DOLLARS ON 



FIELD and 



DIXIE BRAND 

SEEDS 



NEW CROP NOW ON SALE 



Begin now planning- for the biggest farm 
year In history with tried and proven 
Hill's Dixie Brand Seeds— high in ger- 
mination and parity — best all-around 
results assured. 



PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL 



GEORGE W. 



Since IMS 

ILL 



AMD 



COMPANY 



SEEDSMEN SINCE 1863 



24-26 W. 
SEVENTH ST. 



25-29 PIKE 
STREET 



COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



V 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



SOCIAL AND 

PERSONAL 



Mr. and Mrs. John Dudley 
Breeden of DeLand. Fla. left for 
their Florida home Monday after 
a nine day visit with their parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Breeden of 
Walton and Mr. and Mrs. R. E. 
Colclough and family, on Indepen- 
dence and friends. John Dudley 
received the rating of 3rd Class 
Petty Officer January 1st. He is 
stationed at the Advanced Marine 
Air Base in DeLand, Fla. Mr. and 
Mrs. Breeden are well pleased with 
their Flordia home. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Lemons have 
returned to their home on High 
School Court, from the Harris 
Moore farm. 

Powers Conrad left Tuesday for 
Louisville to attend the Convent- 
Ion of Hardware men. 

Alvin Hopperton of Cincinnati 
was the guest of his sister, Mrs. 
T.. O. Ballard and Mr. Ballard 
Saturday. 

Miss Daisy Hill has moved to 
the property of Mr. Taylor, on N. 
Main St., next to Dixie State 
Bank, where she will live and also 
have her store and ice cream 
parlor. 

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Willis Berkshire were: Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Robbins and sons of 
Patriot, Indiana, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ab Robbins and daughter, Qoldie 
of Florence and Mrs. Chester 
Sturgeon and daughter, Jo Ann 
of Cincinnati. 



Mrs. H. F. Mann, president of 
the Walton Homemakers Club leit 
Tuesday to attend the Annual 
Farm and Home Convention being 
held in Lexington, Jan 25, 26, 27 
and 28. Miss Mary Hood Gilespie, 
Home Demonstration Agent, Mrs. 
Schram of Florence, Mrs. Willis 
of Bullittsville, Mrs. Stewart of 
Verona were among those attend- 
ing the convention. " 

Mr. and Mrs. Roland Glenn 
delightfully entertained with a 
lovely buffet supper Saturday 
night. Those attending were: Mr. 
and Mrs. Joe Wolf of Cincinati, 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Anderson of 
Ludlow, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 
Schwab, Mr. and Mrs. C. H. 
Finnell and the host and hostess. 

Sgt. Lewis Shields, former 
Walton-Verona ' basketball coach 
was in Walton~T>*iday,jand Satuz* 
day for a short visit with his many 
friends here before returning to 
Camp Fannin, Texas. Sgt. Shields 
had a 14-day furlough, most of 
this time was spent with his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. James Shields 
and family of Elizabeth, Ind. 

Mrs. F. A. Lindsay and children 
of Covington spent the past week 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Roland Glenn. 

Miss Helen Mann returned to 
Cincinnati after a week's visit 
here with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Clifford Mann and Ruth. 



— Xruett "Pluok e r" - — DeMo: 

student at the University of Ken- 
tucky and member of the famous 
Kentucky Wildcat Basketball team 
spent the week-end with his par- 
ents, Rev. and Mrs. R. F. De- 
Moisey. 

Miss *Ella Mae Chambers and 
Miss Martha Brown, students at 
the I University of Kentucky spent 
the week-end at their respective 
homes. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Schwab and 
daughters entertained Sunday for 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Menke of 
Dayton, Ohio. Afternoon callers 
were Mr A and Mrs. Obie Cook and 
son. 

Mrs. Mary Howe is spending 
this Week at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Elliott and 
daughter, Jo Ann were guests 
Sunday of Rev. and Mrs. C. J. 
Alford of LaGrange, Ky. 



NICHOLSON 



MT. ZION 



TARPAULINS 

After Selling Your Tobacco, Stop and See Our 

Line of Tarpaulins 

All Sizes — Prices Reasonable 

— WE ALSO DO REPAIR WORK — 

COVINGTON AWNING & ROOFING CO. 

Yi Square South of Kenton Loose Leaf Warehouse 4 

301 Scott St. COVINGTON Hlland 1735 



Mrs. John Martin and daugh- 
ter Lois ^pent the week-end with 
John Martin in Tenessee. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kline Menefee of 
Crittenden visited Mr. and Mrs 
Johnson Pettit and family one 
night last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ferrell and 
son, Misses GwendQlyjaPerrelland 
Juanita Kuhn of Covington spent 
Sunday with Mr. arid Mrs. Harve 
Ferrell and family. 

Leroy Ferrell who is with the 
U. S. Navy is spending a 17-day 
leave with his parents and re- 
latives here. 

Mrs. Clifton Webster, John 
Lawrence and Glenn Anderson 
were visitors in Covington and 
Cincinnati last week. 

Miss Dean Hutsell of Covington 
spent last Sunday night with Mr. 
and Mrs. C. C. Collier and daugh- 
ter. 

Misses Eunice Jump and Marian 
Sipple were supper guest of Miss 
Carol Brown at Crittenden Friday 
night. 

; Mrs. Aquilla Cook has purchas- 
ed the ' property of Mrs. Frances 
Jump, deceased, in Mt. Zion. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Speagle 
of Falmouth have purchased the 
property of Mr. and Mrs. Herman 
Kenney. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Vaughn 
visited Mr. and Mrs. Dud Delph of 
Williamstown Saturday. 

Miss Murvel Hutsell of Sherman 
was the supper guest of Mr. and 
Mrs. Clarence Collier and daugh- 
ter, Virginia Ruth. 



TOMORROW'S HEADLINES 



"Remember thy creator in the 
days of thy youth". Children al- 
ways respond more readly to the 
Gospel message than do those of 
mature years. Heaven's richest 
blessing upon them. 

In appreciation of his faithful 
serviecs rendered and as a token 
of esteem the Hickory Grove 
Church recently generously pre- 
cented their highly efficient pas- 
tor, Rev. Courtland S. Weldon 
with a hundred dollar check. Such 
an act of generousity is highly 
commendable, and is truly worthy 
of emulation. 

Mrs. Addie Chambers of Inde- 
pendence was a recent pleasant 
caller. i 

In observance of the tenth 
milestone she has reached in life's 
journey Miss Betty Jo Weldon 
enjoyed a lovely little celebration 
with a few small friends Saturday 
afternoon at the residence of her 
parents, Rev. and Mrs: Courtland 
S. Weldon. The birthday cake was 
aglow with ten tiny pink tapes 
casting a soft radiance throughout 
th room. Delightful refreshments 
of ice cream and cake were served, 
and games were enjoyed. She was 
made happy indeed over many 
lovely gifts and' the "guests like- 
wise were gladdened by little 
souvenir baskets of candy. Those 
in attendance were: Jacqueline 
Morgan, Bessie Morgan, Betty Jo 
Weldon, Kirtley Weldon, Allen 
Butler, Johnny Butler, Nellie Fisk, 
Shirley Jane Collins, Peggy Jo 
Popp, Phyllis Williams Joyce 
Armstrong and Curtis Peebles. All 
reluctantly took their departure 
wishing that the little hostess 
might celebrate many, many more 
Happy Birthdays. 

Rev. and Mrs. Courtland S 
Weldon paid a brief call Friday 
afternoon. 



WALNUT LICK 



Mrs. Emma Willeford returned 
home last week from near 
Napoleon where she had been 
visiting her. sister-in-law, Mrs. 
Goldie Ringo who was quite sick 
with the flu, but glad to report 
her better. 

Miss Elvie Speagle and Mrs. 
Mae Brown spent a few days last 
week with their sister, Mrs Sarrah 
Webster who is very ill. We hope 
for her a speedy recovery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey • Hughes 
visited his brother, Mr. and Mrs. 
Hubble Hughes of Rising Sun, 
Indiana Saturday night. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Edrington, 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Hughes and 
James Whitson visited Mr. Ed- 
rington's sister, Mr. and Mrs. Jake 
Miller of Rising Sun, Indiana. 
Their son, Corporal Bernard 
Miller was home on a three-day 
leave. He will be sent over seas in 
the near future, he is in the Air 
Corps. 

Mrs. Laura Beach was calling 
on her sister last week, Mrs. 
Sarrah Webster who is in a ser- 
ious condition at her home at 
Munk, Ky. 

Most every one in this com- 
munity are through stripping 
tobacco and delivering. All re- 
ceived very good prices. 

Mrs. Ruby Hopper came back to 
her fathers last week from the 
Mts. where she had ben staying 
with her sister, Mrs. Andrew 
Craft. . . - * 



" ' ■ i^fti W i i ^n 



1. L HAMILTON & SON 



FUNERAL SERVICE 






VERONA 



*l- 




STEPHENSON MILL 
ROAD 



Mr. and Mrs. Levis Pennington 
visited Mr. and Mrs. Herbert 
Day on last Thursday. 

Joan Farris and cousin, J. T. 
Farris who is home on a furlough 
from the Navy visited Lucy and 
Jimmy Pennigton on Wednesday 
night. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Day and 
children visited Mr. and Mrs. A. 
P. Day on Frogtown Road on 
Monday. 

Jimmy Pennington is nursing a 
broken finger that he received 
palying basketball. Hurry and get 
that finger well Jimmy and get 
back with our team. 

Mr. and Mrs :> Levi Pennington, 
spent Friday in Covington. 

Mrs. Rachel Penington visited 
Mrs. Herbert Day on Saturday. 



Get' New Pressure 
Cooker Books. 



Anyone who has purchased a 
Victory Canner made by the 
National Pressure Cooker Com- 
pany are requested to destroy the 
instruction and recipe book that 
came with the canner. Either 
write direct to the firm or con- 
tact Mary Hood Gillaspie, Home 
Demonstration Agent,* Burlington 
for a new instruction book. 

The National Pressure Cooker 
Company has requested all old 
recipe books be destroyed because 
definite improvements in instruct- 
ions have been made recently. 

All pressure cookers have b^en 
removed from the ration list since 
the last week in December. 



&A 



$Al-LV 



ran 



ttECOft 



"ndnd 



«^m 



tttontinft tfews 



fS^mMm^^ 



CommitsHara; 



BUY 




perialDietBeggPeace 



WAR BONDS 




This sticker in your win- 
dow shows you bought 
extra W or Bonds. It 's your 
battle flag here at home. 



Sure — we'd all like to tee headlines like these. But just 
waiting and hoping won't make them come true. 

The plain truth is that while we now hold the initia- 
tive in this war, we have yet to penetrate beyond the 
outer perimeter of Axis defenses. We still have a long, 
hard, road to go ... a road that will be longer and 
harder if there is any let-down now. 

That's why you're being asked to buy txtra War Bonds 
during this Fourth War Loan. To keep our fighting 
men supplied with the weapons they need to win.. . . at 
a minimum cost of blood and lives. 

Remember — war eats up munitions at an incredible 
rate. The bonds you bought last year won't win today's 
battles. So buy at least one extra $100 bond now . . . and 
keep on buying bonds until Victory. 



News for you 
about the WAC 



Want to know how the new 
WAC recruiting policies apply 
to you? , 

Want to know whether 
you're qualified for a special 
kind of Army job — whether 
you'd serve with the Air, 
Ground, or Service Forces — 
Whether you could be assign- 
ed to the part of the country 
in which you enlist? 

TODAY— get full details at 
the nearest U. S. Army Re- 
cruiting Station (your local 
post office will give you the 
address). Or write to: The 
Adjutant General, Room 4415, 
Munitions Building, Washing- 
ton, D. C._ 



Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Day en- 
tertained Mr. Day's sister, Mrs. 
Walter Johnson and daughter, 
Wanda of Cincinnati, Ohio over 
last week-end, 

Mr. and Mrs. Amos Pennington 
and' daughter Judy of Dayton, 
Ohio visited Mr. and Mrs. Levi 
Pennington on Saturday and 
Sunday. <■ 

Mrs. Marion Stephenson has 
returned home from the hospital. 
We wish her a speedy- recovery. 

Mrs. Louise Stephenson visited 
her husband Pvt. Lebus Stephen- 
son, wno is with the U. S. Army in 
Georgia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mathew Flynn of 
Hamilton are visiting Mr. and Mrs 
Leo Flynn and Mr. Flynn's mother 
Mrs. Emma Flynn of Walton. 

Mrs. E. S. Rader has been called 
to Richwood, Ky. because of 
illness. 



NEW JAMES 
THEATRE 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 



SHOW EACH AND EVERT NITE 
AT 7:30 CENTRAL WAR TIME. 
SUNDAY MATINEE AT 2:30 
CENTRAL WAR TIME. BAR- 
GAIN NIGHTS MONDAY AND 
THURSDAY. 



All children regardless of age 
must have a ticket for each snow. 
No parking aUowed west of side- 
walk In front of Theatre or filling 
station adjoining. Police Orders. 



UttAU BACK THE ATTACK! 



This Advertisement Sponsored by 



COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 




Another Big Double Feature 

Attraction at no increase 

in price. 

DON'T MISS THEM 

Simone Simon - Michael Whalen 
Wally Vernon - Dennis OTteefe 

JAHATf HONEY 

Pius a wild and wolly wester 

drama 

Tex O'brien - James NewiH and 

The Texas Rangers 

WEST OF TEXAS 

FRL & SAT., JAN. 28-29th 



(STAFFORDSBURG 

Miss Helen Richardson and Mrs. 
Geo. Folmer* spent Saturday 
shopping in the city. 

Mrs. Alice Ervin spent Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Earl Hanna. 



Larry Ray Richardson is~having 
trouble with his ear. 

Miss Hope Keeney spent the 
week-end with her parents and 
grandmother. 

Mrs. L. N. Hoffman is still 
under the Doctors care. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harley Hanna 
spent Sunday evening with Mr. 
and Mrs. W. E. Hanna. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Goedde visited 
his parents on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Rapp have 
purchased the Farrell home. 

Bob Farrell was home on a fur- 
lough on the week-end. 

Come to Sunday School and 
preaching services on the fifth 
Sunday. 



o 



KEEP ON* •** 
• WITH WAR BONDS •" 




A Savings 

A«ount means 

security and 

Safety -for 

th« -future. 

Build V0UR 

account now. 



Working \ 
steadily ? \ 

Then save I 
regularly 1 
for you'll I 
need money Y 
after the war, \ 



[ 

u 

]! 





FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION • 

OF COVIN GTS , ' 

501 MAIN STREET (Office Open Daily) HEMLOCK 1MB 




.INCORPORATED 



*V» Is For 
Vision 

Everybody has a part In the 
drive for VICTORY. Good eye- 
sight is of vital importance. Eye 
strain and defective vision keeps 
a person below normal, when It 
is his or her patriotic duty to feel 
as well and strong as possible. 

Come in today and hare your 
eyes examined. 

FRANK RIGGS 

Optometrist 
Pike A Russell Covington. Ky. 



See the most amazing picture of 
the new year- 

THE ADVENTURES OF 
TARTU * 

- with 
Robert Donat - Valerie Hobson 
Walter Rilla 
SUNDAY, JANUARY 30th, 



Charles Sterrett 

FRONTIER FURY 

MONDAY, JANUARY 31st 



It's a brand new discovery in 

film. history — see how terrific 

they are together 

Monty Woolley - Grade Fields 
Alan Mowbray 

HOLY MATRIMONY 

TUES. A WED., FEB. l-2nd 



CRIME DOCTOR 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3rd 



Having sold may farm and giving all my time to my 
trucking business, I will sell to the high bidder on 
Paxton Road, 1 x / 2 miles South of Fiskburg and one 
mile off of Route 17 or 3 L Highway, known as 
the Homer Oliver Farm, on 

FRIDAY, JAN. 28 th 

AT 10:00 P.M., (CWT) "* 

LOOK FOR SIGN 
Team of extra good work horses, weight about 
1500 lbs. each, 10-11 years old, this team matches; 
one bay horse, 13 years old; one gray horse, 8 yrs. 
old — good workers; 11 head of extra good milk 
cows, most all are fresh, Holstein and Jersey; 1-18 
month old Holstein Bull; 1 good wagon, box and " 
hay bed; 2 mowing machines; hay rake; disk 
harrow; 2-horse jumper; lay off plow; 7-shovel 
plow; 2 shovel plow; 4 land plows; pitch forks; 
sled; hoes; shovels, and all kinds of small tools; 
some hay, alfalfa & timothy; iron kittle; 2 five and 
5 ten gallon milk cans; 1 good ice box; davenport; 
dresser; bed springs and bed and some other house- 
hold furniture and .other things too numerous to 
mention. 

TERMS— CASH 
LUNCH WILL BE SERVED ON GROUNDS 

MALCOLM OLIVER 

OWNER 

Harry Johnson, Auctioneer — Phone Ind. 6196 
J. B. Doan, Clerk 




WALTON ADVERTISER 



Thursday, January 27, 1944 





IF NOSE" 

CLOGS UP 
TONIGHT 

Put 3-purpose Va-tro-nol up each 
nostril. It (1) shrinks swollen 
membranes, (2) soothes Irritation, 
(3) relieves transient nasal con- 
gestion . . . and brings greater 
breathing comfort. if ■*•.■#*• 
Follow the complete vKKe) 

~ VATRO MOL 




Monkey Receptionists 

Trains that stop at way stations 
near Udaipur, India, are always 
met by troops of monkeys that 
emerge from the jungle to chatter 
at the passengers. 




Life's Highlights 

In a cemetery at Ruidoso, N. M., 
is a tombstone bearing this in- 
scription: "Wild Bill Britt. Ran 
for sheriff ill '82. Ran from sheriff 
in '83. Buried in '84." 



ief At Last 
For Your Cough 

Creomulslon relieves promptly be- 
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trouble to help loosen and expel 
germ laden phlegm, and aid nature 
to soothe and heal raw, tender, in- 
flamed bronchial mucous mem- 
branes. Tell your druggist to sell you 
a bottle of Creomulslon with the un- 
derstanding you must like the way It 
quickly allays the cough or you are 
to have your money back. 

CREOMULSION 

for Coughs, Chest Colds, B ronchitis 



50-Pound Seeds 

In the Seychelles Islands of the 
Indian ocean are palm trees whose 
seeds weigh as much as 50 pounds. 



FALSE TEETH 



HELD FIRMLY BY 



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SNAPPY FACTS 

ABOUT 

RUBBER 




Inflatable rubber barges for 
the U. S. Navy are "cured" 
at B. F. Goodrich In a steam 
vulcaniior that Is 42 foot 
long, lOVz foot. In diameter, 
weighs 35 tons and has a 
door that alono weighs 10 
tons. It's a record for size and 
turns out the 25-foot barges 
at a rate of one every 50 
minutes. 

Synthetic rubber plants already 
completed and those scheduled 
for construction will have an an- 
nual rated capacity of 850,000 
long tons. Before the war the United 
States consumed about 600,000 
long tons of rubber annually. Now, 
however, our supplies must be 
shared with the United Nations. 



Ifttmoz peace 



BFGoodrich 



? 1RSTIN RUBBER 



1W157 




LEW BURNET, riding back to southern 
Texas from his Wyoming ranch In the 
spring of 1875, meets an old trapper, 
WILLY NICKI.F, who tells him that the 
bank at Ox Bow has been robbed. He 
also says that TOM ARNOLD, owner of 
the Cross T ranch. Is planning to move 
his herd to Wyoming, and hints that Tom 
will need a trail boss. Willy voices his 
disUke of CLAY MANNING, ranch fore- 
man. On the night or the robbery, Willy 
says he saw Tom's son, STEVE AR- 
NOLD, riding with four strangers. Willy 
also mentions that some gang Is stealing 
horses from the Cross T herd. Lastly, 
Willy tells Lew that JOY ARNOLD has 
not yet married her fiance. Clay 
Manning. 



CHAPTER n 

Lew reflected that he needed only 
cattle or money to stock his Wyo- 
ming ranch. . . . That brought him 
back to Tom Arnold's letter, puz- 
zled and wondering, sure of one thing. 
Tom's promises were never small. 

"You come south and boss this 
trail drive for me," the letter said, 
"and I'll make you a proposition." 

As always when riding the Little 
Comanche certain familiar land- 
marks rose ahead, each one with a 
special meaning, and he could, see 
in them the {en years he, had spent 
here, ever since he was a home- 
less, drifting kid of fourteen and 
Tom Arnold. had taken him in. 

He could see those growing years 
of school and ranch life and the 
close, wild companionship of Three 
Apaches — himself and Joy and 
Steve. In his young way then he 
had thought it would go on like that 
as long as they lived. The three of 
them would always be together. 
Even earlier in that evening of the 
Ox Bow dance, a year ago. there 
had been nothing to warn him. That 
was why it had struck so hard. 

He remembered Joy's strange si- 
lence on the ride home, with Clay 
Manning holding his horse close to 
her stirrup, his talk and laughter 
even more gusty than usual; and 
then the secret that had burst from 
him against Joy's sudden protest, 
"No. Clay! Not yet!" 

But Clay had said, "Why not? I'll 
tell the whole world, honey, you're 
going to be my wife!" 

He remembered how that word 
"wife" had struck into his brain. 
She was only a little girl! But then 
he had looked across his saddle at 
her in a new way, brought by that 
word, and she was no longer a little 
girl; she was a woman, nineteen, 
ready to marry a man. 

Something had ended for him that 
night, something he had taken for 
granted and counted on, unknowing- 
ly, until it was suddenly gone. He 
had tried to fill that gap with a 
new life in Wyoming and knew now 
that he never could. It was not 
only Joy, he realized. It was what 
the three of them had had together, 
himself and Joy and Steve. 

Guardedly, with all his alert 
senses centered on the dark choked 
growth of Crazy Woman's month, he 
moved across the narrow entrance 
at a slow pace, watching for signs. 
Then in a sand wash below the 
opening he came upon a swath of 
tracks and halted to read them with 
a detailed care. 

They were all of horses, unshod, 
all going into Crazy Woman, none 
coming out. That would have been 
the bunch, he judged, which old 
Willy Nickle had told about last 
night. At least twenty in the herd. 

He urged his black horse forward, 
and in another hour, when a patch 
of willow at'Ten Mile Spring blocked 
the way, it was his eagerness that 
made him cut into an opening 
through the trunks instead of going 
around. He knew instantly it was a 
mistake. 

Nothing had warned him. This 
was an isolated five acres of growth 
on the barren valley floor. But it 
was also, he saw at once, an ideal 
lookout post for the men stationed 
here. 

His first urge was to rein back 
and make a run. Yet it was already 
too late for that Four men had 
spread out in a little clearing di- 
rectly ahead of him, hands close to 
their holstered guns. And then, even 
as the urge ran through him and 
was gone, he knew that whatever 
game he was to play here on the 
Little Comanche would have to open 
some time. He might as well open 
it now. 

He rode in and stepped down from 
his saddle, while the outspread four 
closed in again to face him across 
the ashes of their camp. He nod- 
ded. "How are you, gentlemen? Had 
my eyes peeled for bucks and feath- 
ers. Glad to see white men again." 
He jerked his head south. "Maybe 
you can tell me how far to Ox Bow 
town?" 

That eased them. It placed him 
as a stranger. He saw the tight 
readiness go out of their arms a 
little. 

One asked, "You headed for Ox 
Bow?" 

"And beyond," he said. He pulled 
Out his pipe and loaded it, explain- 
ing, "Been coming-down the trail." 
Squatting, he searched the ashes 
for a live coal. He found the ashes 
warm with a bed of fire underneath. 
So these men had cooked a noon 
meal here- and were waiting — for 
what? 

Rising, he faced the one man who 
had spoken. "What' a the brand on 
this range?" 

The answer came gruffly, "Cross 
T. Know it?" 

He shook his head. "New to sag." 



The man was hard to place, squat 
and powerfully built, black-bearded 
over a pugnacious jaw, shrewd gray 
eyes. There was the look of the 
cattleman about him, except for his 
hands. Even gloves could not have 
protected them so much from the 
calluses and burns of a cowman's 
rope. They were soft; the skin above 
his wrists was white. 

The squat man asked, "What out- 
fit?" 

"Circle Dot," Lew said, naming 
a brand far to the south. 

He saw the gray eyes hold a mo- 
ment's speculation, move to the oth- 
er three men and pause, and there 
seemed a silent question asked and 
answered. They came back then, 
veiled 'behind drooping lids. "You 
looking for a trail job?" 

"No, not yet. I aim to get my 
old one with the Circle Dot." He 
knocked out his pipe and put it in 
the side pocket of his rawhide coat, 
standing there afterward with the 
thumb of his right hand hooked over 
the pocket edge. 

"If you've been north three times 
and know enough," the man sug- 
gested, "maybe you can get a bet- 
ter deal here. What routes do you 
know 7" 

"My own," he said and smiled 
faintly. "And that knowledge comes 
high." ' 

"Keep it then!" 

"Sure. I'm not asking you for a 
job." Puzzled, he turned away. He 
had thought this was a camp of 
horse thieves. \ 

"Well, I'll tell you." The deci- 
sion came slowly, still with a guard- 
ed reluctance. "We need a good 
man. We're shorthanded on a herd 
starting north tomorrow. The right 
kind can draw seventy a month." 

That was almost double the usual 
wage. Lew grinned. "What's* wrong 
with the color of your herd?" 

"Nothing. It goes out of here with 
a clean bill of sale. We're traveling 
fast, that's all. I'm willing to pay 
for a man who knows some short 
cuts." 

"I see." He had his information, a 
big herd, going north tomorrow to 




"Nobody asked you to talk 
much! Now then, school's out." 



so 



Ogallala or beyond. He turned him- 
self a little, facing squarely toward 
the four bunched men. "It's a 
tempting oiler. But I guess not" 

He saw their quick suspicion and 
the move that all four started to 
make. But his own right hand 
hooked on his coat pocket had only 
to drop slightly and the gun came 
up in the curved grip of his fingers. 

Under its level aim the group 
froze. Dryly he said, "Nobody asked 
you to talk so much! Now then, 
school's out." 

Moving backward slowly, he 
reached around with his left hand 
for the bridle reins of his horse. He 
watched the four men. They held 
their hands rigidly away from their 
guns. — — 

His groping fingers touched the 
reins' smooth leather. He heard the 
animal's nostrils rattle in a snort, 
felt a quick pull, yet could not take 
his eyes from the men. He start- 
ed to say, "Easy, boy—" when a 
rope slapped out of the air behind 
him, pinned bis arms and jerked 
him over backward to the ground. 

Afterward, coming out of the sud- 
den darkness that a downward blow 
against his jaw had brought, he felt 

-first the dull ache where he had been \ even seen you! Wait Lew 
struck and then the tight rope that 
held him. He was lying off at one 
side of the camp, where they had 
bound him with the thoroughness of 
experts, ankles together, hands tied 
behind his back, a length of rope 
snubbing him close to the trunk of a 
tree. All five were crouched now at 
the ashes of their fire, again in that 
attitude of waiting. 

It was still another moment be- 
fore he caught the drumming run 
of a horse. Unchecked, the rush of 
hoofbeats aimed in toward the wil- 
lows, slowing only when they 
reached the outer edge. Then the 



rider entered with no signal— some- 
one wholly familiar in the camp. 

He twisted his head for a better 
look, but could see no more than a 
dim shape of man and animal blend- 
ed together. A voice growled, 
"You're late!" 

The blended shape moved a lit- 
tle. The rider's answer seemed 
forced out of him in a desperate 
way: "You're lucky I came at all) 
I told you last night there'd be no 
more!" 

Something cold and hard tight- 
ened down the long length of his 
body. He'd recognize this voice any- 
where. Clay Manning! 

"I've filled your bargain. I'm 
through!" ■»■ ' 

"You think so!" There was a 
shifting movement of the dim fig- 
ures standing on the ground. "We 
don't. Quit now and you know 
what happens." 

"That's what I rode to tell you." 
Clay Manning's voice and the 
blurred whirling of his horse came 
in the same instant "Not tonight!" 

One of the group yelled, "Stop 
him!" and a gun's yellow flame 
streaked across the dark. But the 
crash "of (Say "Manning' « horse 
through the willows continued, and 
then he was running free down the 
valley floor. 

The men made a quick shuttling 
movement among the trees; Lew 
heard the slap of saddles and cinch 
leather. Then someone came and 
bent over him, jerked at the knots, 
testing them, and without a word 
ran back. The horses were visible 
now and the shapes, of the riders 
swinging up. He heard a moment's 
mutter of talk, like a plan being 
made and changed and. suddenly 
decided upon. Bolting from the 
camp, they, too, aimed their head- 
long run toward the south. 

Twisting, he made another savage 
attempt to loosen the ropes until 
the breath went out of him in a 
gasp of their cutting pain. And 
when he dropped back again, face 
up, a man was standing over him 
In the dark. 

"Thought so!" said old Willy 
Nickle and came silently forward. 
"Fix in' to get yourself rubbed out 
so you were. Don't you never take 
an old coon's advice, no sirree!" 
The sharp blade of his scalping 
knife parted the loops of rope. 

Forcing his stiffened body up onto 
legs that had gone numb, Lew said, 
"I bad to know." He threw open 
the camp bedrolls until he found one 
where his gun had been hidden. 

"So you did," old Willy admitted. 
He wiped the knife on his greased 
sleeve. "Seems like I was watch- 
ing from the rims. Saw you come 
in here. Never saw you come out. 
But didn't them five go south in a 
hurry? And what for?" 

"You don't know?" Lew asked. 
His horse was in the willows, the 
pack mule near by. He was up in 
his saddle when old Willy answered, 
"Couldn't say. Was a fire off south 
after sundown, too far to tell what." 

Lew nodded. The horse was mov- 
ing. Behind him Willy Nickle 
warned, "They'll lift your hair yet, 
boy. You better watch!" 

Then the black's strong lunge car- 
ried him beyond the spring and he 
was out on the .open valley floor, 
running, with the mule trailing 
somewhere in the dark. He was 
soon at the Cross T. 

His sense of everything wrong 
here settled upon him with a heavy 
weight; 4he empty corrals, the si- 
lence, the absence of Cross T men. 
The faint slit of light widened a lit- 
tle. 

"Who is it?" The demand came 
quick and sharp, hardly more than 
a tight whisper. 

He didn't move. "Joy!" 

"Lew!" The door swung back. She 
made a small dark figure rushing 
toward him. 

He caught her and her arms went 
around him and clung with some- 
thing desperate and almost fierce in 
their grip. "Lewi" she said again. 
And then, "I can't believe it!" 

Holding her, all the month-long 
ache was swept from his body; His 
tiredness was gone. It was like 
hunger satisfied. She moved first 
drawing away, and he asked, "Joy, 
what's happened?" 

"I don't know!" The fear he had 
quieted broke into her quickened 
voice again. "Our grass stacks were 
burned, late this afternoon, and a 
little while ago Clay rode in and 
said something to Dad. I didn't 
hear. But all the men went with 
him." 

"Where?" 

"Down the valley. Our trail herd's 
been gathered there on the flats." 

He took her hands. "Are you 
alone?" 

"No. Owl-Head's here." 

"Then I've got to go. I can help." 

She gripped him. "But I haven't 

Wait a 
little— " 

A sudden burst of gunfire rattled 
in the distance. A rumble like far- 
off thunder trembled up from the 
valley mouth. In the first moments 
of running his horse beyond the 
ranch buildings he couldn't place 
the direction of that low rumble. 

He veered off to cut in at the 
head of the stampede, drawing hit 
gun. A dust fog rolled out to meet 
him; the clack of horns and hoofs 
and the heavy breathing of perhaps 
four thousand animals swept aside 
every other sound. 

(TO BE CONTINUED! 



r^^«^«r^r*^*r^r^r^r^r^r^r*r^r* 

un7oZ d 1 SUNDAY 

International II SCHOOL 

•:• LESSON^ 

By HAROLD L. LTJNDQUIST, D. D. 
Of the Moody Bible Institute of Chicago. 
Released by Western Newspaper Union. 

Lesson for January 30 



Lesson subject* and Scripture texts se- 
lected and copyrighted by International 
Council of Religious Education: used by 
permission. 



JESUS USES HIS POWER 
__ TO HELP _J 

LESSON TEXT— Mark 4:35-41; 3:35-43. 

GOLDEN TEXT— Why are ye so tear- 
tul? How is It that ye have no faith?— 
Mark 4:40. 



TO YOUR 




CLASSIFIED 

DEPARTMENT 



b Y DR. JAMES W. BARTON 



Released by Western Newspaper Union. 

CHRONIC SKIN ULCERS 



Help— that is what man needs, 
and nothing but the power of Christ 
will suffice to meet his fears and sor- 
rows. Christ appears in Mark as 
not only the matchless Teacher of 
the parables we have just studied, 
but the mighty Worker. 

This is the Gospel in which Christ 
is presented as the Servant of Je- 
hovan, who came to use His infinite 
grace and power for our deliverance. 

Two great fears gnaw at the vitals 
of man's existence. Life is full of 
awful dangers, and death is so 
dreadfully final and sorrowful. He 
is afraid to live, and afraid to die — 
apart' from his faith in Jesus Christ. 
We find the answer to both these 
fears as we here see — 

Jesus' Power Overcomes 

I. Fear of Life's Dangers (Mark 
4:35-41). 

The long day of teaching had end- 
ed (v. 35), and the disciples car- 
ried out His request that they go to 
the other side of the lake to rest 
Just "as he was" they departed, and 
before long the tired Jesus was 
asleep. We know how* He felt, and 
what is even more blessed, He 
knows how we feel when we are 
tired. - 

As He slept, a sudden storm (com- 
mon on the Lake of Galilee) brought 
deathly fear to the hearts of His 
disciples. For the moment they saw 
only the angry waves, the smallness 
of their boat, and the hopelessness of 
their situation. 

Had they forgotten Jesus? With 
Him in the boat, they had no reason 
to fear. They called on Him, and in 
His majestic and authoritative 

Peace be still" the wind and waves 
recognized their Master's voice. 

Should we not learn that In this 
day of fears and alarms, we may 
(if we are Christians) count on His 
presence and His power. If we look 
at the overwhelming waves of cir- 
cumstances and think how frail we 
are, surely our hearts shall fail us 
for fear. But if Christ is with us, 
we are in no danger. 

Now they were struck with awe 
at His power. "Sometimes the de- 
liverances wrought by our Lord so 
reveal His presence and power that 
His followers are more deeply 
moved than they were by the perils 
which threatened. Whether mas- 
tering the storm,. or standing unseen 
In our midst today, He appears to 
the eye of faith, clothed in divine en- 
ergy and power" (Erdman). 

II. Fear of Death's Deep Sorrow 
(5:35-43). - 

Trouble is a visitor in every home, 
it does not matter how securely that 
home may be founded upon wealth 
or social position. Frequently, death 
chooses a shining mark in taking a 
dearly beloved child. Children strike 
their roots deep into our hearts and 
when they are torn from us our 
whole beings are rent and convulsed. 
Such was the great storm of sorrow 
which had come upon the home of 
Jairus, leading him to make the 
brave step of faith and hope which 
brought him to Jesus. 

Then as Jesus turned to go with 
Jairus a woman touched Him. He 
stopped to seek her out and com- 
mend her for her faith. The seem- 
ing delay must have greatly troubled 
Jairus, particularly when the ser- 
vants came and informed him that 
he need no longer trouble the Master 
since his daughter was dead: Not 
infrequently we have similar expe- 
riences, where it seems that while 
God has promised to help us, He has 
been turned aside and has forgotten 
us. The psalmist in Psalm 42:3 cries 
out, "My tears have been my meat 
day and night, while they continually 
say unto me, Where is thy God?" 

Our Lord was not troubled at all 
by the message of the servants of 
Jairus, but He showed His thought- 
ful consideration of the father by 
reassuring him with the words, 
"Fear not, only believe." 

Everywhere fear blocks the way 
of human peace and progress. Dl- 
vine wisdom offers a remedy for it 
all— only believe. We excuse our lack 
of faith by the conditions which con- 
front us, but none of us face condi- 
tions worse than those which con- 
fronted Jairus. His daughter was 
dead and he was told to believe! He 
obeyed and his faith was rewarded. 

When He said, "The child is not 
dead, but sleepeth," our Lord did 
not mean that actual death bad not 
taken placer but He meant that in 
the sight of God death is like a sleep. 
In the eyes of Christ spiritual death 
was undoubtedly far more terrible 
than physical death. A man may be 
physically alive and yet being spir- 
itually dead be worse off than a 
man who, though physically dead, is 
spiritually alive. 

After putting forth the mourning 
scorhers, the Lord performed a 
miracle by simply speaking to the 
child and saying, "Little girl, arise." 

Here then is the Lord who can 
overcome every fear, in both life 
and death. Is He not the one we 
need as our Saviour? 




Dr. Barton 



Almost every week we are hear- 
ing and reading of the remarkable 
results obtained by the use of sul- 
fanilamide and its close relations, sul- 
fathiazole, sulfapyr- 
idine and others. 

While its 'effects 
in reducing deaths 
from pneumonia 
from almost 10 per 
cent to almost 2 per 
cent is its most out- 
standing action, its 
effective use in lo- 
cal infections in 
ear, throat and oth- 
er parts is being 
frequently reported. 
One of the dis- 
couraging ailments in bedridden 
and elderly patients is what is 
called decubital ulcers or bed sores, 
some of which are deep and abso- 
lutely refuse to heal despite rest and 
all forms of applications. 

As sulfathiazole tablets have been 
effective in infected tonsils and sul- 
fathiazole in ointments has helped 
infected bones (osteomyelrtis>,-two 
Cleveland physicians, Drs. J. I. 
Goodman and J. F. Corsaro, report 
their results of using sulfathiazole 
in five patients Who had these chron- 
ic ulcers for a long time. 

These ulcers had been treated with- 
out success by other methods, one 
for as long as 21 months. These 
physicians crasher* the ordinary sul- 
fathiazole tablets into a powder and 
applied this powder daily by means 
of a salt shaker. 

The quantity of the drug varied 
with the size of the ulcer, as suf- 
ficient powder to coat the ulcer com- 
pletely was used. The amount var- 
ied from one to three level teaspoons. 
"Almost Immediately after the 
sulfathiazole powder was applied the 
infection cleared up and clean, 
healthy granulation tissue, followed 
by rapid healing, appeared." 

Their success with the ordinary 
ulcer or bed sore led these physi- 
cians to use this method for one 
patient with chronic bone infection, 
two with slow healing ulcers of the 
feet due to injury, one with draining 
fistula or canal from a' recently 
amputated stump," and one with a 
stubborn pilonidal sinus. This is a 
sinus or running sore at lower end 
of spine. 

Five is not a large number, but 
these particular ulcers are always 
difficult and slow to treat, yet "heal- 
ing was rapid and complete in each 
patient," . 

This will certainly be good news 
for physicians and patients who have 
been "battling" with old chronic ul- 
cers for long periods of time. 
~ • • • 

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Modesty In Man 

Modesty is to the other virtues 
4n a man, what shade in a picture 
is to the parts' of the thing repre- 
sented. It makes all the other 
beauties conspicuous, which would 
otherwise be but a wild heap of 
colors. — Sir R. Steele. 



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NEGLECTED COLDS 

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A cube of gold slightly more 
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In my student days physicians and 
mothers of young babies feared the 
coming of summer because it meant 
summer diarrhoea and great loss of 
life among infants and children. 
Thanks to the better care and pres- 
ervation of milk and the advance 
in knowledge of preparing food, 
fear of summer does not exist any 
more. 

Another interesting fact about life 
and health has been brought about 
by World War II. Women are now 
engaged in work formerly done by 
men and the Metropolitan Life In- 
surance company has recently made 
a study of the health of our women 
since the last war. 

They find that our women "are 
now in excellent physical condition 
to carry on the tasks of war." 

This excellent condition is due to 
the phenomenal gains made in the 
last 25 years in the nation's fight 
against important diseases like tu- 
berculosis, pneumonia and those as- 
sociated with pregnancy and child- 
birth. During the last 25 years the 
death rate of women insured In this 
company was cut in half. 

"There were 13 deaths in every 
1,000 women, ages 15 to 74, in 1915-16, 
as against only seven in 1940-41." 
During this same 25 years the death 
rate among young women— ages 15 
to 24— was reduced by 70 per cemVl 

The reduction in the death rate 
from tuberculosis was mostly respon- 
sible for these figures, as tubercu- 
losis stood first as a cause of death 
previously to World War I, whereas 
it now stands fifth. w 

Pneumonia was responsible for 107 
deaths' per 100,000 before World War 
I; now the death rate is about 21 
per 100,000. 

The death rate in diseases asso- 
ciated with pregnancy and child- 
birth has dropped, during the last 25 
years, from 47 to 13 per 100,000. 

Results such as the above could be 
obtained only by the cooperation of 
all -citizens who have been willing 
to pay their share of the cost. ' 
• • * 

QUESTION BOX 

Q.— What causes broken and split 
fingernails? 

A.— This condition usually means 
lack of Ume in the system. Eat 
feeds containing lime— milk, cheese, 
egf yolks, green vegetables. Your 
doctor could prescribe lime . (calci- 
um) direct and save time. 

c e e. • 

Q.— Is there any such thing as be- 
ing allergic to face powder? 

A.— Many Individuals are allergic 
tefaoe swwders. 



/" To relieve distress of MONTHLY "\ 

Female Weakness 

Lydla E. Plnkham's Vegetable Com- 
pound Is made especially lor women 
to help relieve periodic pain with Its 
weak, tired, nervous, blue feelings 
— due to functional monthly dis- 
turbances. 

Taken regularly — Plnkham's Com- 
pound helps build up resistance 
against such symptoms. Here Is. a 
product that helps nature and 
that's the kind to buy I Famous for 
almost a century. Thousands upon 
thousands of women have reported 
benefits. Follow label directions. 
Worth trying! 

.LYDIAE.PINKHflM'Sco G M% A i« 
v 



AT FIRST 
SfSMOFA 



c 



ov>» 

use 666 



666 TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DROPS 



Gather Your Scrap; if 
* Throw It at Hitler! 



.?& RHEUMATIC PAIN 

With a Usslelss thai will Provs Mull 

If you suffer from rheumatic pain 
or muscular aches, buy C-2223 today 
for real pain-relieving help. 60c, JL 
Caution: Use only as directed. First 
bottle purchase price refunded by 
if not satisfied. GetC-222& 



WNU— E 



SURVEY SHOWS 



Many Doctors 
Recommend 

SCOTT'S/ 



• HELPS BUILD STAMINA 

• HELPS BUILD ACTUAL 
RESISTANCE TO COLDS 

Try good-tasting Scott's Emulsion 1 Con- 
tains natural A & D Vitamins that help 
bring back energy and stamina if there 
h dietary deficiency of these elements. 
Take it daily. All druggists! 



'$ ^SCOTT'S 
EMULSION 

- Great Year-Round Tonic 






I 
I 



I 



I 






Thursday, January 27, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



• OUR COMIC SECTION • 



PETER 
B. 



&l AH EASIER 








CAM- HOW 
ABOUT IT- 
WILL YOU 
MARRY 
ME? 




TELEPHONE 



>tW*~f,W^» 





fmE first time i fired 

AT A LION I KILLED 
TWO I 
HYENAS ' 





DOUBTFUL EXPERIENCE 




Patient— But how do you know you 
can cure my sickness? 

Doctor— I've had the same thing 
for ten years myself! 

Weak C*«*apter 
Tim— Did you knowToe got a Job? 
. Pat— Yes, 'tis a pity what some 
people will do for money. 

Peer Imitation 

Brown— Did you reprimand your 
youngster for mimicking me? 

Blue— Yes, I told him to stop act* 
tng like • foot" 



Wake With a Smile 

Harry— I thought you said an 
alarm clock couldn'.t waken you? 

Jerry— It can't, but I got a par- 
rot; tea — - 

Harry— What's that got to do with 
your getting up in time? 

Jerry— I hang the clock next to 
his cage. It wakes the parrot And 
what he says would rouse anyone! 



Very, Very Good 

Housewife — Are you a good cook? 
Cook— Oh, yes, ma'am. I go to 
church every Sunday. 

What Town? 

Bill— I suppose your home town la 
one of those places where everyone 
goes down to meet the train? 

Will— What train? 



Manner of Speaking 
Firefly One— Put out that light! 

This is supposed to be a blackoutl 
Firefly Too— I can't help It When 

you gotta glow, you gotta glow! 



Jones— I haven't any money, but 
I can give you some good advice. 

Smith— If you haven't any money, 
I guess your advice won't be worth 
much. 



sure 



Can Yon Beat It? 

Harry— Boy, that cream 
looks good. 
Jerry— Surel I just whipped it! 



True Love 

Joe— Why do you call your girl 
friend "Ration Book"? 

Bill— Because I can't get along 
without her! 




HOUSEHOLD 

i MV 5*0i ifdym 



s , &&&& 




Midwinter Jellies Pep Up Menus! 

(See Recipes Below) 



Get Your Spreads! 





Are you low on brown points? 
Then set the jelly and jam kettles 
boiling with midwinter fruits and 
make some delicious spreads to 

save points. 

■i 

Last summer when homemakers 
were putting up their fruits they dis- 
covered they did 
not have enough 
sugar for putting 
up all the jams 
and jellies they 
would like, but Vi; 
now they have 
probably caught up on the sugar and 
can boil the juices they saved into 
delicious, quivery jellies. Use the 
jellies and jams on biscuits and muf- 
fins when the butter is scarce. It 
spells first aid and appetite appeal 
to menus. 

For those of" you who did not put 
up juices for winter jelly-making, 
there are plenty of fruits in season 
now that make delightful spreads. 
Out with the kettles and colanders, 
with jelly glasses and paraffin and 
here we go: 

Orange Marmalade. 
(Makes 6 6-ounce glasses) 
t% cups prepared fruit (about 

1*4 pounds) 
1% cups sugar 

1 3-ounce box powdered fruit 
pectin 

Prepare fruit Use peels from 6 
medium-sized oranges and 2 lemons. 
Cut in quarters. Lay quarters flat; 
shave off and discard half of white 
part. Put peels through chopper 
twice. Add 1 cup sugar, 2% cups 
water, juice from 1 medium-sized 
lemon and % teaspoon soda. (This 
1 cup sugar is in addition to meas- 
urement given above.) Cover. Heat 
to boiling. Simmer 30 minutes, Stir- 
ring occasionally. Measure sugar 
into dry dish and set aside until 
needed. Measure prepared fruit Into 
3 to 4-quart kettle, filling up last 
cup or fraction of cup with water 
if necessary. Place over high heat. 
Add powdered pectin, mix well, and 
continue stirring until mixture 
comes to a hard boil. Pour in sugar 
at once, stirring constantly. Con- 
tinue stirring, heat to a full, rolling 
boil and boil hard 2 minutes. Re- 
move from heat skim, pour quick- 
ly. Paraffin hot marmalade at once. 

Honey Orange Jelly. 
(Makes 6 6-ounce glasses) 
1 cup Juice 
3 cnps honey 
H bottle fruit pectin 

To prepare juice, squeeze and 
strain Juice from 2 medium oranges. 
- r, ...... . .. . Measure Juice 

and honey into a 
large saucepan 
and mix well. 
Heat to boiling 
over high heat 
and at once add 
fruit pectin, stir- 
ring constantly. 
Then heat to a full rolling boil and 



Lynn Chambers' Point-Saving 
Menu 



Dinner Complete 

- Lettuce Salad with French 

Dressing 

Bran-Raisin Muffins Jelly 

Baked Apple Oatmeal Cookies 

Beverage 




Lynn Says 



Jelly Bints: Consistency and 
flavor are the most important 
points In making jelly. Careful 
cooking can give you a high score 
on both. 

To Jell, fruit Juices must con- 
tain pectin or must have it added 
from a commercial product Pec- 
tin must be combined with the 
correct proportion of sugar in the 
presence of acids and mineral 
salts to form jelly. 

Prolonged cooking destroys the 
power of pectin, especially in the 
very acid fruits. This is the rea- 
son that no more water than nec- 
essary should be used in cooking 
the fruit 

Best jellies are tender and 
quivery and translucent. They 
should cut easily but break with 
a clean, sharp line. 

Save Used Fata 



boil hard % minute. Remove from 
heat, skim, pour quickly. Paraffin 
hot jelly at once. r 

Grapefruit Marmalade. 
(Makes 2 to 3 pints) 

1 grapefruit 
. #» 1 orange 

1 lemon 

Slice fruit very thin, remove pulp 
from peel. To each pint of pulp, 
use an equal quantity of water and 
\Vi times as much sugar. Let come 
to a boil. Remove from fire, let 
stand overnight. Boil the shredded 
skins 'of " the fruit in twice their 
bulk of water until tender, then let 
stand overnight in the water in 
which they were boiled. On the 
next day, heat the skins to the boil- 
ing point then add pulp mixture 
and boil tepidly until thick enough 
to congeal when tested. Pour Into 
sterilized glass jars and seal. 

If you can spare a few points for 
the crushed pineapple called for in 
this recipe you can make a colorful 
and tart jam that will delight the 
family no end: 

Winter Jam. 

3 caps cranberries 
1 cup diced apples 
VA cnps water 
1 cup crashed pineapple 
3 cnps sugar 
Juice and grated rind of 
■w 1 lemon 

Cook the cranberries and apples 
in water until they are clear and 
tender. Add the 
lemon, pineapple 
and sugar. Mix 
well and boil the 
mixture rapidly 
until it is thick 
and clear. Pour 
into sterilized 
glass jars and 
seal at once. 

Colorful and spicy is this next jam 
with all the relish and tang that 
only cranberries can give: 

Cranberry Jam. 
8 caps cranberries 
1 cop each, water and vinegar 
6 caps sugar 

1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 
H tablespoon ground cloves 
H tablespoon ground allspice 

Mash cranberries lightly. Add 
vinegar and water and cook until 
soft Put through a coarse strainer; 
add sugar and spices. Cook 8 min- 
utes, stirring constantly. Pour into 
sterilized jars and seal immediately. 

And now for those of you who 
have bottled grape juice on hand. 
Here Is an excellent jelly that is 
quickly made with powdered fruit 



^SEWING CIRCLE 



MHSJBBjai 




pectin: 

Grape and Orange Jelly. 
(Makes 7 6-ounce glasses) 
3% caps sugar 
IK caps botUed grape Juice 
1H caps canned orange juice ' 
1 box powdered fruit pectin 

Measure sugar into a dry dish and 
set aside until needed. Measure 
juice into a 3- or 4-quart saucepan 
and place over hottest Ore. Add 
powdered fruit pectin, mix well, and 
continue stirring until mixture 
comes to a hard boil. Pour in sugar 
at once, stirring constantly. Bring 
to a full rolling boil and boil hard 
% minute. Remove from fire, skim, 
pour quickly. Paraffin hot jelly at 
once. 

// you wont sugar-saving suggestions, 
write to Lynn Chambers, Western Newt- 
paper Union, 210 South Des plaints 
Street, Chicago 6, Illinois. Don't for' 
ft to enclose a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope for your reply. 
Released by Western Newspaper Union. 



\ 





Two Pretty Blouses 
DLOUSES worthy of your finest 
*-* hand touches are presented. 
They have the new touches— ruf- 
fles, interesting necklines, draw- 
strings and bows! 

• • • 

Barbara Bell Pattern No. 1908 is de- 
signed for sizes 12, 14, 16, 18, 20; 40 and 
42. Corresponding bust measurements 30, 
32, 34. 36, 38, 40 and 42. Size 14 (32) 
ruffled neck blouse with long sleeves re- 
quires 2V4 yards 39-inch material. 1% 
yards eyelet embroidery. Drawstring 
neckline blouse, short sleeves, requires 
1% yards. 



For Warmth, Comfort 

nET the greatest good from this 
^* pajama pattern by making it 
twice — once in flannel or broad- 
cloth as a sleeping- suit, once in 
flannel or corduroy as a lounging 
suit. Both ways it will help keep 
you warm this winter. 



Barbara Bell Pattern No. J903 Is de- 
signed for sizes 12, 14, 16. 18, 20; 40 and 
42. Corresponding bust measurements 30, 
32, 34, 36, 38, 40 and 42. Size 14 (32). with 
long sleeves, requires 5% yards 35 or 39- 
inch material. 



SEWING CIRCLE PATTERN DEPT. 

530 South Wells St. Chicago 

Enclose 20 cents In coins for each ' 
pattern desired. 


. ■■ 








Address 




' 




Just 2 drops Penetro 
Nose Drops lo each 
nostril help you 
breathe freer almost 
instantly, so your 
head cold gets air.. 
Only 25c— 2»4 times as 
much for 50c. Caution: 
Use only as directed. 
Penetro Nose Drops 



TABASCO 

The snappiest seasoning known, and 
the world's most widely distributed 
food product I A dash of this piquant 
sauce gives a rare flavor to any food. 
TABASCO— the seasoning secret of 
master chefs for more than 75 years I 




• . . hew good . . . and rrutrl- 
tlous . . . and economical, 
are those biscuits and quick 
bread*— baked with Clab- 
ber Girl. 



CLABBER GIRL 



,VwAKnME{ 



sSSsss 



fiiscunsj 






*V*3 






_' The New Wartime Bditicp 
of Fleischmann'a "Bread Basket." 
Entire section on wartime cooking 
problems. Economical; ration-point 
savers. Quick, easy breads, sugar- 
aavtng dessert Hem. AB nude iwttli 
Fleisclunann'syoXtowIabeiYeasb-the 
only fresh yeast with both Vitamins 
Aand D, aa well as the Vitamin B 
Complex besides. Write Standard 
Brands Inc., Grand Central Anoex; 
Box 477, New York. N. Y. 



SUGAR 

SAW* 

IMA? 



a 



■ 

J 
■ 




WALTON ADVERTISER 



CONSERVATION NEWS 
By J. Casper Acree 

Grasse farming is the surest 
way for improving depleted soils, 
as well as retaining what we have 
left. Old pastures will do a great 
deal of extra grazing if we do a 
little work on them" Probably the 
first step would be brushing and 
rocking; that is cut or deaden 
undesirable brush and trees and 
trim some of the lower limbs off 
the best trees, using some of this 
material for mulching galded 
areas. Loose rock should be piled 
so that they can be removed for 



GUITARS 

$15.00 up 

USED TENOR BANJO $12.00 
USED C MELODY SAX $29.00 

HOY ACITFF AND OTHER 
GUITAR, CORD AND IN- 
STRUCTION BOOKS. GIB- 
SON AND BLACK DIAMOND 
STRINGS FOR ALL INSTRU- 
MENTS. 

COMPLETE MUSICAL 
--'WATCH AND CLOCK 

REPAIR 

HANSER JEWELRY & 
MUSIC COMPANY 

515% Madison Ave. ■ 
Covington, -:- Kentucky 



crushing later -on. Rev. William 
Smith said that he deadened or 
xiackfcd 

this time last year and that all of 
them died. Nearly all of the land 
in Boone County needs lime and 
phosphate. If this material is 
available at least two tons of lime 
and 300 lbs. of 20% phosphate 
should be applied per acre. Now 
also is a good time to thicken 
grass stands and to seed bare 
sponts. A mixture of grasses 
should be used. On sweet land a 
mixture of sweetclover 5 lb., red- 
top 2 lb. ryegrass 5 lb., and blue- 
grass or orchard grass 5 lb. should 
be used, and on sour land les- 
pedeza 5 lb., redtop 2 lb., ryegrass 
5 lb. should be used. The rate of 
seeding of this mixture per acre 
of course depends on the stand of 
grass already established. After we 
have a good pasture and want to 
keep it we must practice pasture 
rotation. Welds should be arrang- 
ed so stock can be moved from 
field to field every three or four 
weeks. This not only is beneficial 
to the pasture and stock as far as 
grazing value, but, it will help 
control parasites. Last but not 
least where at all possible fields 
should be clipped so as to en-' 
courage even growth ahd to get 
rid of undersirable growth," then 
too these clippings return to 
humus faster where they have 
fallen down on the ground. 
Spring AM Here 
Bulldozers came out of their 
winter hiding like a swarm of bees 
last week. Spring must be here. 
One outfit is building ponds op 
Omer Cleeks farm this week and 
is scheduled to go to the Bob 
Green and J. B. Hizer farms next 
week. Mr. Hizer had the- Soil 
Conservation District to locate 
two reservoir sites for him. After 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1944 



completing one of the dams he 
plans on pushing a pipe thru the 
so th a t w a t e r , can flow to a 



7 



OPA MEASE OF WOMEN'S 
FOOTWEAR 



DAILY PROOF YOU DO SAVE HERE 



No Lay-Aways 
No Exchanges 
Every Sale Pinal 




• Leather Uppers 

• Gabardine Uppers 

• Real Leather Soles 



Odds and ends, 
all sizes In the 
group, but not in 
every style 



$0.00 



'3 



• High Heels 

• Medium Heels 

• Low Heels 



NO RATION STUMP NEEDED 

QUALITY SAMPLE SHOES 



627 Madison Ave. 



Covington 



CO. 1430 



AUCTION 



In order to settle the Estate of the late Albert 
Shields, I will sell at Public Auction at the Albert 
Shields farm, 4 miles South- West of Union on the 
Big Bone Church Road, on 

SAT, FEB. 5th 

10:00 A. M. 

8 Milk Cows, date of freshen, 1st Feb., 1st March, 
3rd May, 1st June and 1st of Sept.; 1 yearling 
heifer; 1 team work horses, work anywhere; 1 
work mule, work anywhere; 2 road wagons; 1 disc 
harrow; 1 Vulcan breaking plow; 1 Oliver break- 
ing plow; 1 two horse sled; 1 hay rake; 1 three 
shovel plow, good as new; 1 single shovel plow; 
1 two horse tobacco setter, 1 scalding box; 4 set 
work harness; collars; bridles; check lines; 1 vice; 
chains; hose and forks; post digger; shovel; small 
tools; 1 ten gallon milk can; 1 can washer; 1 cream 
seperator; and some household goods. 

TERMS— CASH > 

Luncn Will Be Served On The Grounds 



BECKHAM 



COL LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



concreate trough below. By using 
an automatic cutoff he will have 
clean water available for the 
stock at all times. Also by extend- 
ing the pipe he can furnish water 
to another field eleminating digg- 
ing another reservoir. He is think- 
ing of building a second reservoir 
east of the barn, using the dam 
for , a roadway eleminating con- 
siderable erosion down a steep 
slope, used for a lane. These re- 
servoirs will be stocked with fish 
furnished thru the District. - 

A Second Bulldozer built a nice 
reservoir on the Helen Tomlih 
farm at Verona this week. Mr. 
King, operator of the farm, is 
certainly proud of the fact that 
he will have plenty water next 
year. Likewise a pipe was placed 
thru ftie reservoir dam and a 
fence will be built to keep stock 
out of the reservoir. This reservoir 
was staked out by the District and 
will be stocked with fish. A third 
reservoir being constructed this 
week-is- on the Orville Kelly Farm. 
Orville says he has worn out 
several pencils putting down the 
number of gallons of water he has 
hauled the last few years. When 
this reservoir is completed his 
water problem should be over for 
it will have a depth of eighteen 
feet. This reservoir is being con- 
structed under District super- 
vision and will be used as a de- 
monstration fish pond. Thru the 
bottom of the dam an eight inch 
string of tile was laid, and a drain 
trap will be built at the upper end 
of the string so that it will be 
possible to drain the reservoir at 
any time. An inch pipe will be run 
thru the tile to furnish stock 
water to a trough below. This re- 
servior will be stocked with fish, 
fertilized and an account will be 
kept of the catch. Little by little 
Boone county is becomming a 
county of many reservoirs. In- 
formation on how to construct 
farm reservoirs can be secured at 
the county agents office or the 
Boone County Soil Conservation 
District Office. 



SUGAR CREEK 



Mr. and Mrs. Al Smothers of 
Cincinnati and Mr. and Mrs. El- 
wood Noel and children of Guil- 
ford, Ind., spent Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. Albert Noel. 

Mrs. Grover Clifton and son 
entertained friends from Cincin- 
nati Sunday. 

Mr. Jessie Turner of Covington 
wa^ a business visitor here Wed- 
nesday. 

Pvt. Roy Kinman of the Army 
Air Corps, Amarillo, Texas spent 
several days with Mr. and Mrs. 
John Crifton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Mays and 
Mr. and Mrs. Claud Auckey of 
Cincinnati spent Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. C. J. Wallick. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Carlton 
and Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Hayes of 
Warsaw called on Mr. and Mrs. 
R. H. Story Wednesday evening. 

Miss Myrtle Edwards and Mrs. 
Emma Wallick were business 
visitors at Glencoe Friday. 

Mrs. Helen Shelton, Miss Nellie 
Clifton, Clyde Ellis, Robert Clif- 
ton, Miss Fay Miskell and Ber- 
nard Griffin attended the fiddlers 
contest at Music Hall Sunday 
night. 



Schurmeier Bros, of Carroll 
county produced more than 3,200 
pounds of Ky. 33 tobacco on two 
acres, selling it for $54 per hun- 
dred. 



WANTED_Man and wife to work 
and live on farm. Wife to help 
with nousewoTB: , ~ husband — to" - 
assist in general farm work. 
Own cottage furnished. Write 
complete details, stating com- 
plete experience, wages expected 
and other data, care of the 
Walton Advertiser (66), Walton, 
Ky. it- 10 



STOCK FOR SALE— One good 
team mules, work anywhere; 
1 Hampshire sow, farrow Mar. 
10th; also 2 White Face Heifers, 
8 months old. A. C. Johnson, 

. 120 N. Main St.. Walton, Ky., 
Phone 125. lt-10* 



FOR RENT— 2 room apartment, 
unfurnished. A. C. Johnson, 120 
N. Main St., Walton, Ky. Phone 
125. lt-io* 



WANTED— a tenant to raise 1.5 
acres of tobacco on Shares and 
work balance of time by month. 
Mrs. Stella Richardson, Morn- 
tog View, Ky. 2t-10* 



LOST— R a t i o n Books, Billie 
Roberts, Emogene Roberts, Or- 
ville Ecklar, Lizzie Ecklar— No. 
3 books; Emogene Roberts and 
Lizzie Roberts — No. 4 books, lost 
January 15th. 2t-10* 



FOR SALE— Large size feather 
bed, in good condition, also 
dressing table With mirrof. Mrs. 
Martha' Wallace, Ph. Walton 30 
or 88 in the evening. 



WANTED— A tenant for the Will 
Willeford farm, near Concord, 
Gallatin Co. Tobacco base 4% 
acres. Plenty of ground for hay 
and corn. Mrs. Ed. Hopperton, 
Crittenden, R. 2. 2t-10* 



NOTICE— After January 31, 1944 
all milk sold will be 14 cents a 
quart. John Conrad, Walton, 
Ky - it-10* 



WANTED— A girl for general 
office work and waiting on 
customers. Brown Dry Cleaning 
Shop, Erlanger, Ky., Dixie 
Highway. 2t-10 



FOR SALE— 8 shoats; 1 white 
male hog, weight 200 lbs. and 
1 bred sow. Carrel McFarland, 
2'.i miles East of Devon on 
Bristow Pike. 2t-9* 



WAR BONDS 

No More Brass 



VERONA 



Many people in this community 
are digging ponds. Water is very 
scarce. ■ ' 

Mr. George Spenneberg is ill at 
the home of his daughter, Mrs. 
John Boyer. 

Mrs. C. C. Kannady is very sick 
at her home. 

Joe Rouse and family have 
moved to the Jesse Wilson farm. 

Tevis Thomas has moved into 
the Arch Noel house until his 
home on the G. C. Ramsom's place 
is vacated. 

Mrs. Lorena Myers and son 
spent Sunday with her daughter 
Mrs. Johp Sowle and family of W. 
Covington. 



On land or at sea our fighting men 
do their many chores by the sound 
of a bugle. All sorts of uncompli- 
mentary epithets are used to desig- 
nate the bugler, but nobody has yet 
been able to provide a satisfactory 
substitute for a bugle although re 
cordings are used at some perma 
nent bases. 



FOR SALE— 112 Acre Farm. All 
good land with 5.8 tobacco base. 
25 miles south of Covington. 6 
room house with electric. Large 
tobacco and stock barn. Chicken 
house, garage, etc. $12,000. For 
quick sale. Mrs. John Myers, 
Verona, Ky. 4t-10* 



WASHERS REPAIRED— Author- 
ized Maytag Service, Maytag 
Oil. Wm. Hagedorn, 856 Dixie 
Highway, Erlanger, Ky. tf-49 



FOR SALE— Baled hay and straw. 
John Conrad, Edwards, Avenue, 
Walton, Ky. PhoneS!?. lt-10* 



OCCUPATIONAL TAX 



All occupational tax for the 
year 1944 is now due and pay- 
able at the City Hall. 
R. E. BRUGH, 

Tax Collector. 




Aboard ship the men fall in at the 
order of "Pipe muster." On land 
the bugler sounds "Assembly!" But 
no matter where the bugle is used 
thousands must be bought out of 
the money we are investing in War 
Bonds. Back the attack with an ex- 
tra $100 Bond In the. 3rd War Loan. 

V. S. Treasury Department 



LOST— Parker Fountain Pen, 
black and red stripes with gold 
band. Reward. Mary Ransler, 
Walton, Ky. 



WANTED TENANT— For Stock 
Faun — No Tobacco. Owner will 
furnish all tools, house, 2 shoats, 
1 milk cow, 10 acres for own use 
and will pay $30.00 per month. 
Good trot line fishing in Lick- 
ing river, 6 miles from Coving- 
ton, Ky. A. G. Wern, Spring 
Lake Pk., Spring Lake, Ky. 5t-9* 



LOST— A ring of keys, between 
Walt on and Dry Ridge. F inder 
please leave keys at Advertiser 
Office. 

FOR RENT— One of the best 
tobacco farms in Carroll Co. 
with Interest In sheep, beef, and 
dairy cattle. Come in and talk It 
over. Mrs. S. G. Tilton, Gent. 
Ky 4t-7» 



WANTED — Stenographer, in 
law office, Erlanger, Ky., per- 
manent position, excellent 
^opportunity for right person. 
Call Dixie 7047 or Dixie 7110. 
Harry Riggs. lt-10 



20 TEARS In radio servicing. W. 
M. STEPHENSON, Radio spec- 
ialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Coving- 
ion. Colonial 1121. tf-10 



W A N T E D— A capable house- 
keeper, must like children. 
Address reply to Walton Adver- 
tiser, Dept. W., Walton, Ky. tf5 



WANTED TO BUY— Used fur- 
niture, good and bad; antiques; 
coins; old glassware; old pic- 
tures; books and buttons. John 
Stubblefied. Walton, Ky., R, 2. 
Phone 495. 6t-9* 



PIKE STREET BARGAIN 
STORE 

36 PIKE STREET 
COVINGTON, - KENTUCKY 

Plaid Flannel Shirts for boys $1.29 
Plaid Flannel Shirts for men $1.59 

Work Shirts, Big Yank $1.39 

Grey, Blue, Khaki 

Dandy Brunch Coats $1.69 

To Clear All Headscarfs, 

now 79c ,59o 

Sweat Shirts, now 98c 

NAVY $1.19 

WE HAD ANOTHER 
SHIPMENT OF— 

Ladies' Very 
Sheer Hose 



49c 



WATCH THE NUMBER: 
36 PIKE STREET 



FARM FOR SALE— 123 ',4 acres, 
6-room house, barn 40X60 ft., 
new fencing, tractor land, 3 a. 
tobacco base. Reasonable terms. 
Elmer Elliston, Verona, Ky., Ph 
Walton 768, 3t-10*i 

WANTED— A girl for inspection 
and bagging finished garments. 
Steady wOrk year around. Brown 
Dry Cleaning Shop, Erlanger, 
Ky., Dixie Highway. 2t-10 



FARMS FOR SALE 



REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 



FARMS FOR SALE 



BEECHWOOD ROAD —Modern 
brick home, lot of out-bldgs., 
fruits, shrubs and flowers. 

CRESCENT SPRINGS — 4-rodfh 
cottage $2500 

BROMLEY — Cottage, acre, $1300 

DIXIE HIGHWAY— Modern home 
8 acres $8000 

3 L HIGHWAY— 17 acres, 8 rm. 
house ..^ $6000 

TAYLOR MILL— 17 acres, build- 
ings I. ' $4500 

BUS LINE— 7acres, good build- 
ings $3800 

RYLAND— 124 acres, 2 houses 
$4500 

DECOURSEY— 10 acres, 3 room 
house $1600 

KENTON— 44 acres, house and 
barn, electric $3500 

WALTON— 88 acres, house and 
barn : — .- $ 550 o 

PINER— 60 acres, house and 

• barn $3000 

UNION — 59 acres, house, barn, 
electric ' $5750 

BURLINGTON— 54 acres, new 
modern home $8000 

SILVER GROVE— 39 acres, nice 
home and barn $6800 

JOHNS HILL— 20 acres, stone 
nouse „ | $2000 

LI £KING RIVER— 80 acres, 8 rm. 
mSk-\:. :... $7000 

INDIANA— Near Brookville, 178 
acres, stock farm $5500 

OHIO— Near Hillsboro, 72 acres, 
Colonial home, $6500 

I specialize in land or dirt. You 

furnish the dough, Til 

furnish the dirt. 

REL C. WAYMAN 

623 Washington St., Cov., Ky. 
HEmloek 5107 . Ind. 5064 



30 a. farm, modern house, electric, 
bath, good poultry house and 
barn. 

30 a. poultry farm, equipped for 
2000 hens. Ideal for hatchery 
which we need at Walton badly. 
Modern house and other good 
outbuildings. Good sale for 
produce right at home. 

40 a. farm, 1 mile from town. 

4 a. farm, good 6-room house, 

. electric, garage, chicken house, 
smoke house. 

4-Room house and 1 acre ground 
in Walton. 

108 a. farm on State Rd., 6 acres 
tobacco base and good improve- 
ments. 

225 a. farm, 8 acre tobacco base. 
Good improvements. 

A. C. JOHNSON 

120 N. Main, Walton, Ky., Ph. 125 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



RADIO REPAIRS at reasonable 
rates, colonial 1121. 509 Scott 
Street. tf-io 



NOTICE— Pure Drinking Water 
Hauled anywhere — anytime 
Call Walton 423. Jas. E. Falls. 
. tf-47 



FOR SALE— Chicks, eggs from 
high-producing, tested Reds. 
Don't delay, order early. Simplex 
brooders, Salsbury remedies. 
Grant Maddox, Florence, Ky., 
Phone 384. 15t-9* 



FARM FOR SALE— 124 Acres, % 
mile West of Verona, on con- 
crete highway No. 16. Seven 
room brick house, 3 barns, well 
watered, 5% a. tobacco base, 
good land, high state of culti- 
vation. Eleetric and water in 
house. Selling on account of ill 
health. A. T. Hunt, Verona, Ky., 
Phone Walton 1243. i 2t-9* 



FOR SALE— Store Building to be 
wrecked and remodeled. Cheap 
if sold at once. Apply John 
Code, Verona, Ky. - 2t-10* 



LOST— Hub cap from Studebaker 
car. Return to Advertiser Office 
and receive reward. lt-10 



FOR SALE— 2 good work horses, 
cheap. Robert Chambers, Wal- 
ton, Ky. 2t-10 



63 acres, Flingsville, Grant County 
good two-story six room house, 
good outbuildings, good tobacco 
barn, one feed barn, electric 
line V* mile -from house, on 
telephone line, school bus, mail 
route, good road, Federal Loan 
$3,200. Price $5,400. 
104 acres, S. E. Falmouth 8 mi., 
good road, near village, 6-room 
house, 2 barns, *feed stable, 
electric in house and barn, 20 a. 
alfalfa. Price $55.Rer acre. 
57 acres, same location as 104 
acres, 4-room house, barn, elec- 
tric near. Price $55 per acre. 
221 acres, joins 57 acres, 8-room 
house, electric line close, 45 
acres alfalfa, creek, large pond. 
Price $55 per acre. 
11 acres of tobacco on 104, 57 
and 221 acres. Same owner, 4% 
interest on these three. 
103 acres, same location as last 
three listed, 9-room modern 
house, 3 barns, electric In house 
and barn, 20 by 20 hen house, 
concrete milk house, water 
good, 10 a. alfalfa, 14 cow 
stanchions, 6.6 tobacco base. 
Price $7,000. 
57 acres, edge of Wiliamstown, 8- 
room house, 3 room house, 
electric, 40 by 60 barn, 3 a. 
tobacco base, 5 a. alfalfa, best 
watered in county. Price $10,000. 
132 acres, near Corinth, Grant 
Co. 7-room house, good barn, 
all good . outbuildings, 30 a. 
bottom. Price $50 per acre. 
IF YOU NEED AN AUCTION 
CALL US. Best auctioneer in 
Ky. Low commission. Your 
safety guaranteed by Bond or 
seleval Banks as reference. Large 
auction force, and your property 
advertised thoroughly all over 
Central and Northern Ky. 

TO BUYERS— We finance In 
many cases at a very low rate 
of Interest. 

IF YOU REALLY WANT TO 
SELL, LIST with US, OUR 
VOLUME OF BUSINESS 
SPEAKS FOR ITSELF. 

THE MUTUAL REALTY 
COMPANY 

Falmouth-Ky-Williamstown 
FOREST S. THOMPSON, 

Proprietor 

Everet Chipman, Secretary 

Geo. D. Scott, Sr., Auction Mgr. 

COLONEL ELVA R. KENDALL, 

Auctioneer 



-? 




JUST HOW OLD 

One thing you should know about any funeral 
directing firm is how much experience it has had . . . 
how old it is. We were founded 37 years ago, which 
means that we have behind us a great many years 
of practical experience. 

CHAMBERS & GRUBBS 

Funeral Directors Phone Walton 352 



I 



NO PRIORITIES 

ARE NEEDED FOR FARM TOOLS WELDED 

R. Michels Welding 
Company 

722 Washington St. Covington Colonial 0670 



I 



DEAD STOCK REMOVED FREE 

For Prompt Removal of Horses and Cows 

CALL VALLEY 0887 

WE PAY VHONE CHARGES 

Ky. Dead Animal Disposal Co. 



LOCKLAND 




•rom where I sit 



•^-••-* 



Jy Joe Marsh 



Nothing I'd rather do than sit 
down to some tender, delicious 
Kentucky Iamb. There's few 
things anywhere, finer to eat. 

Which reminds me of a cold 
day I stopped by Bert Cbilders', 
at lambing time. Looked like 
all his black-faced Montanas 
was going to lamb at once! 

"Can you give me a hand. 
Joe?" he called out, and I shed 
my coat and pitched in with him. 

When Mrs. Childers called as 
in to dinner we were pretty tack* 
ered out, and we topped it off 
with a glass of moderate beer. 

"Speakin' of bear," Bert said, 
eyeing the bubbles rising in his 
i ' « 



glass, "The way you lit in and 
cooperated with me to save those 
tiny, helpless little critters re- 
minds jne of the brewers here 
in Kentucky. 

"By workin' together, they've 
done a man-size job. Despite the 
war workers, the army and alL 
they've kept conditions mighty 
good where beer is served." 

And from where I ait, Bert's 
right. Such fine cooperation » 
a credit to old Kaintuckl 



t$>e'kvu£ 



• imm ense h u bi u i n — JaiNW . romrcxrcomnna 



,1523 



Unlversary ol Ky. Libmy 

LEXINGTON KY 



1 



i - 




— NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER — 
Devoted To the Interest of Boone, Kenton, Gallatin and Grant Counties— Kenton-Campbell Courier Consolidated With the Advertiser 



Subscription $1.50 Per Year In Advan 



ce 



WALTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, February 3, 1944 




Orchard Specialist 
To Meet With 
County Growers 



W. W. Magill, Fruit Specialist, 
College of Agriculture, will meet 
with Boone County growers in two 
planning meetings on Wednesday, 
February 16th, according to H. R. 
Forkner, County Agent. 

The morning meeting Will start 
at 10:00 a. m., from the county 
agent's office in Burlington, 
followed with a field trip to one 
of the local orchards. The after- 
noon meeting will be held at 1:00 
p. m. at the farm of William H. 
Moore, Hebron, Kentucky. 

Boone County growers produce 
some of the highest quality fruit. 
Inject and disease control are two 
of the most difficult factors in 
Quality fruit production. The 
annual winter fruit planning 
meetings aid growers in analizing 
their past years production prob- 
lems and in planning their new 
. years production program. 

All fruit growers are cordially 
Invited to attend one "or both of 
the above meetings. 



VOLUME 30— NUMBER 11 



$2,000 Subscribed By Standard 
Oil Company In Local War 
Bond Drive. 

The Boone County quota in the 
Fourth War Loan Drive Is nearer 
fulfillment today due to the sub- 
scription of $2,000.00 by Standard 
Oil Company (Ky.) " 

Mr. C. E. Nelson, the Company's 
local Agent at Erlanger, entered 
the subscription for Standard Oil, 
and received expressions of appre- 
ciation from the Committee. 

Mr. Nelson, well known in this 
community, stated that the action 
of the Standard Oil Company was 
taken as an expression of the 
genuine interest of the organizat- 
ion in the success of the Fourth 
War Loan in Boone County and in 
the state. ■ 



Miss Luke Gordon, teacher in 
the Versailles School spent the 
week end with her mother, Mrs. 
Estelle Gordon and other relatives. 



Local Women Attend Northern 
Ky. State Nurse's Meeting. 



Big Bone Baptist Church 
Calls Pastor. 



The members of the Big Bone 
Baptist Church have called Rev. 
Sam Hogan of the Louisville 
Seminary as their pastor. Rev. 
and Mrs. Hogan and young son 
expect to move to the Parsonage 
the later part of this month. 



Methodist Church 
Fellowship Dinner. 



The monthly church fellowship 
dinner will be held Thursday nite, 
^February 3rd at 7:30 at the 
church- The pastor says that a 
good program is in the making 
and that he knows the good ladles 
will bring their plates "heaped 
up." 

Com* and bring some one with 
you, let's have every member re- 
presented. 

Attend Farm and 
Home Convention. 



Mrs. Robert Brugh, Walton, Mrs 
Jemmison Aylor, Miss Lucy Grant 
and Miss Elizabeth Lowry were 
among those attending a dinner 
at the Chambers of Commerce 
Building Covington Tuesday even- 
ing. 

Lieutenant Leona Jackson of 
the U. S*. Navy was the principle 
speaker. Lieutenant Jackson was 
one of five nurses who was in 
Guam at the time it fell. She was 
taken prisoner. 

Plans are under way to secure 
Lieut. Jackson for a Red Cross 
meeting at Walton High School, 
at which time Home Nursing 
Certificates will be given out to 
the High School girls who have 
just completed this course. 



Mr. and Mrs. Walter Moser and 
daughter of Nicholson spent Mon- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. L. A. John- 
son and daughter and brought 
Loretta Johnson home. 



Change Made In 
Tire Rationing 
Regulations 



Under a drastic change in tire 
rationing regulations announced 
Saturday by OPA, eligibility of a 
motorist for new passenger car 
tires will be based on the "pur- 
pose" for which he drives rather 
than the kind of gasoline ration 
he has. 

The OPA office for Boone Co- 
unty was informed that the new 
regulations became effective Tues- 
day, February 1st. It gave ration- 
ing boards authority to decide 
who are the "most essential 
drivers." 

Scarcity of used and reclaimed 
rubber tires has "grounded" many 
essential A and B drivers, OPA 
officials explained. The amend- 
ment will make certain that the 
increasing number of new tires 
which will become available this 
year will get into the right hands. 

The new program divides 
motorists into three categories; 
One, highly essential occupational 
drivers; two, less essentia;! 
occupational drivers, and three, 
nonessential drivers. 
BOONE COUNTY WAR PRICE 
AND RATIONING BOARD NO. 8 
R. E. BRUGH, Chm., Walton, Ky. 



Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Ransler left 
Friday for New York, N. Y. to 
spend a few days with their son, 
Charles Jr. who is attending the 
Columbia University, completing 
his studies as Mid Shipman. 



Verona 4-H Club News 



Lloyd Siekman, W. G. Kite, J. 
C. Acree, O. D. Perkinson and H. 
R. Forkner were among the Boone 
County delegation attending the 
Annual Farm and Home Convent- 
ion held at the College of Agri- 
culture at Lexington the past 
week. 

Those attending report one of 
the best farm improvement meet- 
ings held todate. - 



Officers that were elected at 
the January meeting were: Pre- 
sident, Joyce Ryan; Vice-Pre- 
sident, Delbert Messmer; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Wanda Brewster; 
Club Reporter, Marion Arch 
Waller; Song and Cheer Leaders, 
BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH*! Joe Cloyd Ryan and Sarah Chip- 



Rev. Sam Hogan, Pastor 



m. 



Sunday School at 10:00 a. 
(CWT). Harry Rouse, Supt. 

Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m., 
(CWT). 

B. T. U. at 7:00 p. m., (CWT). 

Evening Worship at 7:45 p. m., 
(CWT). 

Services each Sunday. You are 
cordially Invited to worship with 
us ,. 



Pvt. Ralph Stone of the U. S. 
Army and A. J. Stone of the Navy 
are spending furloughs with Mrs. 
Jim Stone and family on Edwards 
Avenue. 




1st NEED-SIGHT 

If you would work to win— 
SEE your way, clearly. Depend- 
able vision is the basic essential 
to success in any field! Better 
Sight— better opportunities. 



man. 

Adult Leaders 

Community Club Leader, Mr. 
Ed. Chipman; Assistant Commun- 
ity Club Leader, Mrs. Fred Ham- 
ilton. 

Project Leaders 

Garden, Norma Easton Jean 
Easton, Mr. Fred Hamilton; Tob- 
acco, Delbert Messmer and Mr. 
Gilbert Brewster. 

Canning and Clothing 

1st year, Mrs. King; 2nd year, 
Mrs. Fred Hamilton and 3rd year, 
Mrs. Wassom. • \ 




Several Friends and Relatives 
Entertained Sunday By Mr. 
and Mrs. Clarence Combs. 



A party was given to Lieut. 
Melvin Dryer and Roy Dryer of 
Park Hills by Mr. and Mrs. 
Clarence Combs at their home in 
Walton Sunday. 

Guests present were: Mr. and 
Mrs. Chas. J. Boyd, Erlanger, Ky.; 
Mr. and Mrs. Charley Boyd, Er- 
langer, Ky.; Mr. and Mrs. J. F. 
Cassidy, daughter and mother. 
Mrs. M. Cassidy, Newport, Ky.; 
Mr .and Mrs. Fred Dryer of Lud- 
low; Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Dryer 
and daughter of Edgewood, Ft. 
Mitchell; Mr. and Mis. Geo. Dryer 
and two sons, Roy and Melvin of 
Park Hills; Mr. and Mrs. Matt 
VanLeuvan of Ft. Thomas; Mr. 
and Mrs. Dave Vallandingham of 
Walton; Miss Rita Rose of Cin- 
cinnati; and Mrs. Katie Welsh of 
Walton, Ky. 



Two Precincts 
"Over The Top" 
In War Bond Drive 



W. C. T. U. To Hold Meeting 



The Dorcas Class of the Baptist 
Church met Wednesday at the 
church for their regular monthly 
meeting. 

After a much enjoyed lunch 
and social hour, a most interest- 
ing program was given under the 
leadership of Mrs. Levi Penning- 
ton. The subject was "Jonah". 

Those present were: Mrs. Orpha 
Fisher, Mrs. Grace Jones, Mrs, 
Sarah Sleet, Mrs. Stlsie Norman, 
Mrs. E. B. Powers, Mrs. Nell Hunt, 
Miss Mollie Chapman, Mrs. Maude 
Wilson, Mrs. Bess Conrad, Mrs. 
Ethyleen Ryle, Mrs. Julia Penn- 
ington and Mrs. Woods. 



There 
rolled. 



were 23 members en- 



V»- 



DR. J. O.TYSON 

Optometrist - 
OFFICES WITH 

MOTCH 

Optician — Jewelers 
613 MADISON AVE. COVINGTON, KY. 

" Established 1857 



Pfc. and Mrs. Charles Benson 
are the proud parents of a baby 
girl, born Saturday, January 22nd 
at the Booth Hospital. Mrs. Ben- 
son and young daughter have re- 
turned to the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Dewey Benson, where she is 
making her home while Charles 
is serving with the U. S. Marine 
Corps at California. The young, 
lady has been named Karen Sue. 



County 4-H Clubs 
Stress Quality 
Project Work 



Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Menefee 
of Crittenden were guests Monday 
of Mrs. Kate Noell and Mrs. Lula 
Vest. Mrs. Menefee remained to 
spend Monday night and Tuesday 
with her sisters. 



Layman's Day To Be Observed 
At Local Methodist Church. 



Next Sunday morning, Febraury 
6th the Laymen of the Methodist 
Church will have charge of the 
services. Mr. Bruce Wallace, the 
Charge Lay Leader will have 
charge of the program. 



Ellis O. Bird, 73, a retired At- 
wood, Ky., farmer and former 
Kenton County Deputy Assessor, 
died Sunday at St. Elizabeth 
Hospital, Covington. Kenton 
County Coroner James P. Riffe 
said death was caused by a cere- 
bral hemorrhage. 

Bird was taken to the hospital 
after being found unconscious on 
Madison Pike near Independence 
Saturday. He collapsed on the 
roadway, according to Dr. Rlffe. 

A lifelong resident of Kenton 
County, Bird was formerly a rural 
mail carrier. He was a brother' of 
Atwood Bird, president of the In- 
dependence Savings Bank. 

Services were held Wednesday 
at 2 p. m., -followed by burial in 
Independence Cemetery. 

Surviving Bird are his widow, 
Mrs. Fannie Bird; a daughter, 
Mrs. Carlisle Northcutt, Coving- 
ton; four sons, Remley and Her- 
man Bird, Independence; Chester 
Bird, Toledo, O.; three brothers, 
Ira Bird, Crittenden; Dr. Charles 
J. Bird, Indianapolis, and Atwood 
Bird, Independence, and four 
grandchildren. 



The W. C. T. U. will meet Friday 
in the home of Mrs. Lula J. Hud- 
eson. Please all come who want to 
help- win this war. Time 2:30 p. 
m., February 4th. 

The Unchained Tiger 

We hear the pious advice that 
we should "teach temperance." 
We do. The teacher gives the boy 
a lesson which is certified by 
tragic human experience through 
thousands of years. The teacher 
tells the boy that wine is a 
mocker and strong drink is raging. 

Then the advertiser takes that 
boy in hand. He has at command 
unlimited pages in newspapers 
and magazines, billboards on every 
highway, movies in every town, 
radios in almost every home. He 
has at command captivating 
artists in word, picture, and song. 
He has hundreds "of millions of 
money to spend. 

There is the power which the 
Eighteenth Amendment had 
blocked. There is the tiger which 
you unchained when you changed 
your minds and abolished pro- 
hibition.-Dr. William Lowe Bryan, 
President, Indiana University. 



Local W. S. C. S. Hold 
Installation Meeting. 



Boone County 4-H Clubs started 
their 1944 Organization program, 
with meetings in Hamilton, Verona 
and Walton Communities • on 
Monday of this week, according to 
the County Agent's Office. Heb- 
ron, Constance, Petersburg, Grant, 
Florence, Burlington, and New 
Haven Clubs will ' also complete 
their" new 4-H Organizations this 
week. 

Quality war time Project work 
will feature the 1944 program. 
Five hundred and seventy-six boys 
and girls the past year completed 
937 war projects. The new years 
projects will include dairy, poul- 
try, sheep, pigs, - garden, corn, 
tobacco, clothing, canning, foods 
and room improvement. 

4-H Club work is open to all 
rural boys and girls between the 
ages of 9 and 21 years, who agree 
to carry improved agricultural 
and home economics work. Mem- 
bers will keep business records on 
their project activities. Achieve- 
ment Certificates are awarded by 
the Extension Service and the 
University of Kentucky, to those 
members who satisfactorily com- 
plete their work. 

Enrollment applications may be 
secured from local 4-H club 
officers, adult leaders, the -schools 
of the country, or home demon- 
stration agent's offices. 



Wednesday, January 26th the 
Women's Society of Christian 
Service held its January meeting 
and Installation service for the 
1944 officers at the Methodist 
Church. A covered* dish luncheon 
was enjoyed at noon in the "fire- 
side" room of the church. The 
afternoon session was in charge 
of the Vice-President, Mrs. J. R. 
Conrad. The installation was pre- 
formed by the pastor, Rev. C. G. 
Dearing. Each organization of the 
W. S. C. S. was requested at the 
District Meeting to make at least 
one member a "Life-Member" 
during the year, consequently Cir- 
cle No. 2 had voted to make Mrs. 
Sallie R. Miller a "Life-Member", 
she having been a member of the 
missionary society of the Methodist 
Church for sixty-years. This be- 
ing Mrs. Miller's birthday the 
Circle felt it was a most apportune 
time to announce to Mrs. Miller 
their intentions and surprise her 
on her birthday. Needles to say it 
was a most pleasant surprise and 
greatly appreciated by Mrs. Miller. 

Members and guests present 
were: Rev. and Mrs. D. E. Bedin- 
ger, Rev. C. G. Dearing, Mrs Sallie 
R. Miller, Mrs. W. O. Rouse, Mrs. 
Earl Robinson, Mrs. Mary Step- 
henson, Mrs. Lula J. Hudson, Mrs. 
J. F. Jockey, Mrs. J. R. Conrad, 
Mrs. C. O. Carlisle, Mrs. E. B. 
Wallace, and Miss Emma Jane 
Miller. 



Mrs. James Cheesman, whose 
husband is stationed in North 
Ireland, is now located in one of 
the Norman Apartments on Main 
Street in Walton. Their son, 
James Jr. is improving after a 
severe illness. 



Independence 
Sailor Killed 
In Action 



Mrs. W. L. Sturgeon, Mrs. Wm. 
Soden, Mrs. F. E. Fisher, Mrs. Ed. 
Hankinson, Mrs. James Penning- 
on, Mrs. Bryan Rector and 
daughter Irma, Mrs. Nathan 
Northcutt, Mrs. D. K. Johnson 
Mrs. Jesse Wilson and Mrs. Nell 
Hunt were among those from 
Walton, who attended he quarter- 
ly meeting of the W. M. S. of the 
North Bend Association, held 
Thursday at the Latonia Baptist 
Church. ,...,-.. 



Walton Homemakers 



Torpedoman 2rd class William 
Robert Hampton, son of Mrs. H. 
W. Hampton, Rural Route No. 1 
Independence, has been killed in 
action in the Italian theater, ac- 
cording to a telegram received by 
his parents Friday, January 28th 
from the Navy Department. 

Mrs. Hampton said the tele- 
gram gave no details of the death 
of her son who has been assigned 
to a cruiser. He enlisted in the 
Navy June 20, 1942. 

The Navy man, who was 30, 
was the son of the late, H. W. 
Hampton, Spanish-American War 
veteran and a former chief en- 
gineer of the Covington water- 
works. He also was a nephew of 
Charles Truesdell, reporter for 



The January meeting of the 
Walton Homemakers at the home 
of Mrs. Carrie Rouse was marked 
by the same interest and enthus- 
iasm that has been characteristic 
of all the meetings of that organ- 
ization this club year. 

The meeting was called to order 
by the president, Mrs. Frederica 
Mann, who read a beautiful poem, 
"This I Resolve". After the pledge 
of allegiance and the singing of 
the National Anthem the remain- 
der of the morning session was 
given over to business. 

Following a most enjoyable 
noon hour, the lesson for the day, 
"Mending and Stitches" was well 
presented by Mrs. Edna Vest and 
Mrs. Anna Pearl Gaines. Beauti- 
fully prepared examples of the 
various kinds of patches and 
stitches made this a very interest- 
ing and helpful part of the days 
program. The Home Agent, Miss 
Gillaspie showed hand made ac- 
cessories and suggested others, 
any of which could be made at 
home at very little cost. 

Mrs. Gaynelle Flynn, program 
chairman presented a short Pro- 
gram on "True Worth," in which 
Mrs. Louise Rouse, Mrs. Nannie 
Ranson and Mrs. Flynn took part. 

Mrs. Martha Jane Carpenter 
gave an interesting report on "An 
Italian Tour". 

Sixteen members and seven 
visitors were present. Three names 
were added to the membership, 
making a total of thirteen new 
members 

The February meeting of the 



Subscriptions for the week end- 
ing January 29th amount to 
$129,474.25 which bring our total 
subscriptions to $197,987.50 so far 
in the Fourth War Loan Drive. In 
addition to this we have received 
official notice that the Standard 
Oil fiompany of Kentucky has 
allocated $2000.00 of its subscript- 
ion to Boone County. We have also 
received notice that the Federal 
Land Bank of Louisville has 
allocated $3000.00 of its subscript- 
ion to Boone County. The Federal 
Land Bank, not being a commer-*" 
cial bank receiving deposits,, is 
permitted to subscribe for bonds 
the same as an individual in this 
drive and counts on quotas. The 
people of Boone County apprec- 
iates these two subscriptions 
which came as a surprise and un- 
solicited. We understand the 
Union Light, Heat and Power 
Company placed a $300.00 sub- 
scription through the Florence 
Deposit Bank which is included in 
the total above and counts on the , 
quota of the Florence Precinct. 
The allocations of the Standard 
Oil Company and the Federal 
Land Bank will count on the 
quota of the County as a whole. 

The Belleview Precinct is the 
first precinct to report "over the 
top" on its quota, with Beaver 
following a close second. Several 
other precincts report that they 
are confident of exceeding their 
quotas. With a little work and a 
close canvas by the precnct Char- 
men and their workers we believe 
every precinct can raise its quota. 
Many people wait to be solicited. 
Be sure to see every one. There is 
only one more issue of this paper 
before the close of the drive Feb- 
ruary 15th. Lets have the full 
quota "raised before this coming 
Saturday night as our reports 
must be prepared and given to the 
press on Monday for the previous 
week's subscriptions. Boone Co- 
unty must not fail. The eyes of our 
soldiers are upon us. What is 
your answer to them? What will be 
the opinion of our own Boone 
Cunty soldiers who are in camps 
and on the firing lines if our 
quota is not raised? Your sub- 
scription may be the means of 
saving the life of one of your 
neighbor boys. Can you sleep 
soundly at night if you have not 
subscribed liberally? Go back to 
your bank and make another 
subscription before February loth. 
Don't expect some one to come to 
see you. This is your war. The 
soldiers need your help. We have 
only raised 40% of our County 
Quota. 



Elden demons has accepted a 
position with the Model Food 
Store and began his duties last 
week: 



Rollie Hume, 
Prominent Kenton 
Co. Resident Dies 



The Enquirer. 

In addition to his mother he , Homemakers will be held at the 
leaves two brothers, Lieut. James home of Mrs. B. W. Franks of 



Word has been received that 
William Brittenhelm is able to be 
out again after being in a hospital 
in Northern Ireland for thirty- 
two days with scarlet fever. One 
of his nurses was a lady from 
Falmouth, Ky. His many friends 
are pleased to learn of his re- 
covery. 



E. Hampton, stationed at Sedalia, 
Mo., and Wade Hampton, Inde- 
pendence, and two sisters, Mrs. 
Virginia Hamilton and Miss Eve- 
lyn Hampton. — Kentucky Post. 



Mrs. D. Hess Vest returned 
home Tuesday from Carrollton 
where she spent a few days with 
her husband who is with the 
•^Bright Light" Tobaco Ware- 
house Co. during this season. 

Mrs. C. C. Sleet is very ill at her 
home on South Main St. 



South Walton. 



Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Morgan 
and daughter spent last week with 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joe P. 
Morgan of Owenton. 



Paper Collection 



Rollie Hume, 72, of Nicholson 
passed away Tuesday at Booth 
Hospital. Mr. Hume had been in 
poor health for the past year, 
having been in the hospital the 
past six weeks. 

He was a well known and pro- 
minent farmer, member of the 
Board of Equalization ' of Kenton 
County and had lived in the same 
community all his life. 
Mr. Hume is survived by his loving 
wife, Mrs. Ivanora Watson Hume*, 
and two sons, Philip R. Hume, 
Vice-President of Keelor & Stites 
Advertising Agency and Robert 
Hume, County Agent for Grant 
County; one grand daughter, 
Louise Hume of Ft. Thomas and 
one sister, Mrs. . George (Belle) 
Brown of Indianapolis, Ind.; other 
•relatives and a host of friends. 

The funeral services will be 
held at the residence Thursday 
(today) at 3 p. m. with Rev. R. F. 
DeMoisey having charge of the 
services. Burial will be in the 
Independence Cemetery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hume celebrated 
their golden wedding anniversary 
three years ago. 

Chambers and Grubbs have 
charge of the funeral arrange- 
ments. 



Watch this paper next week for 
date of paper collection, which 
will be some time soon. All paper 
must be tied in bundles. 

— Chairman Committee. 



Rev. R. F. DeMoisey will preach 
at the Walton Baptist Church, 
both morning and evening, Sun* 
day, February 6th. 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



Thursday, February 3, 1944 




Begin Now 

Wifey— I wonder if I'll ever live 
to be a hundred? 

Hubby— Not if you remain 40 
much longer, dear. 



An Idea 

Woman driver — Con you fix this fend- 
er to that my husband will never knots 
I bent it? 

Garage mechanic — No, but 1 can fix it 
to that you can ask him how he bent ft. 



With the high price of cheese, 
we could use a mouse trap that 
springs before the mouse gets the 
cheese. 



Be Careful 

"Doctor, my wife tells me that I 
talk in my sleep. What should I 
do?" 

"Nothing that you shouldn't" 




LEW BURNET, riding back to southern 
Texts in 18TS meeta willy nickle, 
am old (rapper. Willy fells Lew the 
newt: that the bank at Ox. Bow has 
been robbed, that TOM ARNOLD, owner 
of the Croat T, plana to move to 
Wyoming, that STEVE ARNOLD may be 
Involved In the robbery, and that JOT 
ARNOLD is not yet married to clay 
Manning, Croat T foreman. Later, 
Lew encounters four men. They offer 
him the lob aa trail boss. When he re- 
fuses, they capture him and keep him 
prisoner at their camp. During the night 
Lew recognizes Clay Manning's voice, 
shouting: "I'm through." Willy Nickle 
releases Lew, and he arrivet at the ranch 
Just at the Cross T herd it stampeding. 




You can't tee legume bacteria without 
■ powerful microscope. If you could, 
you wouldn't know whether they were 
good bacteria or bad. There is one aura 
way to get plenty of effective inocula- 
tion . . . just ask for NITR AGIN when 
you buy. NITRAGIN it the oldest 
most widely used inoculant. For 45- 
years farmers have used it to get bigger 
yields of alfalfa, clover, soybeans, and 
to build toil fertility. It costs only a few 
cents an acre; but frequendy boosts 
yields up to 30% and more. It pays to 
inoculate every planting of legumes. 
Get NITRAGIN where you buy your 
te ed . Look for the yellow can. 

let Mltr.,1. C, hi. m ». 1*11 JL, M.«,* M It, Wk. 

FREE Booklet* 

How to grow 

better legumet. 
Write today, 
look tor the 
tradename NIT* 
RAG IN on the 
yellow can 
you buy. 



Bombers Have Street Addresses 

The maps of Berlin used by the 
Royal Canadian air force when 
bombing that city show the strate- 
gic buildings by their street ad- 
dresses, which the R. C. A. F. ob- 
tained from a Berlin classified 
telephone directory, borrowed 
from the New York Public library. 




CHAPTER III 

The Longhorns were still In a 
closely packed formation but be- 
ginning to string out, wedge-shaped, 
with a small bunch of leaders at 
the point. Coming,, abreast of these, 
he threw his horse against their 
hard-ribbed bodies, firing his gun 
close to the long, gaunt faces. 

They were running like frightened 
Jack rabbits. But they edged away 
from hjs blazing gun.. -That broke 
their galloping stride for a moment. 

Slowly the black wedge began to 
curve, until in time the point was 
bent in and joining to the base. The 
cattle were still running, but in an 
endless merry-go-round now, getting 
nowhere. Their run slackened. Un- 
der the pressure of men closing in 
they made at last a solid, milling 
pool. 

He turned his horse off to one 
side where a little group of riders 
had halted. 

In the dust and dark he had rec- 
ognized no one and had not 'been 
recognized himself. Then their talk 
began to reach him. 



■ Ell EVE Ease and soothe chafe. Form 

prn medicated coat of protection 

DC If betweenekinandchafingbed- 

djnprQ clothes with Mexaana, the 

OUH CO soothing, medicated powder. 



Streamlined Planes 

America's P-38 fighting plane is 
so streamlined that nearly two- 
thirds of its air resistance is in the 
retractable landing gear. 



AT FIRST 
I0FA 



c 



w 666 



USE 
«*6 TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DROPS 



Invest in Liberty ft 
ft ft Buy War Bonds 



SNAPPY FACTS 

ABOUT 

RUBBER 




A Wisconsin truck driver re- 
cently received a tribute from 
the Office of the Rubber Direc- 
tor because he risked hit life 
to save the tires en the trailer 
of a tractor-trailer unit he 
was driving. The trailer 
caught fire, but the driver 
lacked It up and removed the 
tires while it was ablaze. 

The far-reaching Influence of the 
rubber situation will be appreci- 
ated when It It known that dose 
to 40% of the motor vehicle* ever 
■ado In this country were aril I In 
service In December, 1941. More 
than half of fljem were owned 
by families with Incomes of leu 
than $30 a week. 



Jp*+ptfZm*r 



In, twi oz peace 



MGoodrich 



F, KSi IN RUBBER 



^dlSv 



Someone said, "We're lucky, 
that's all. They didn't get a good 
start." 

"Wasn't luck either," another put 
in. "Who was it got up to the point 
so fast?" That was Tom Arnold's 
rough low voice. 

They ware aware of his horse then 
coming out of the dark, and their 
talk broke off. He rode in, grin- 
ning. "Hello, Tom," he said. 

"Lew?" Arnold's low voice lifted. 
"Boys, it's Lew Burnet!" . 

The group moved and they were 
suddenly around him, their horses 
crowding his legs, and he was shak- 
ing hands and grinning in the 
warmth of friendly faces— Tom Ar- 
nold and Joe Wheat and old "Rebel 
John" Quarternight, who had taught 
him all he knew about cattle. 

He was aware, afterward, of one 
rider who had remained apart from 
these others, and he called out, 
"Hello. Clay." 

Clay Manning brought his horse 
around. "How are you, Lew?" His 
big shape leaned across the saddle 
horn, with all expression on a wide 
mouth closely guarded. He was a 
high, square-built man, young and 
blond and strikingly good-looking; 
one who could be forgiven. Lew of- 
ten thought, for watching his shadow 
on the ground. 

There had been some reason for 
his wait off there in the dark, but 
now, casually enough, he said, 
"Guess you got here just in time. 
How'd you- come?'' 

"Down the valley," Lew said and 
added, "from Dripping Spring to- 
day." At that he saw the brief, di- 
rect stare Clay gave him; yet in 
the faint light he could read noth- 
ing more. 

One by one at spaced intervals the 
guard riders had come past, and as 
their dim figures loomed out of the 
dark Tom Arnold had kept close 
watch. He swung back now, ask- 
ing suddenly) "Clay, Where's Steve? 
You were together." 

"I'll look," Clay said and started 
off. 

Near him Joe Wheat straightened 
up his' thin slat 1 frame, offering, 
"Better take someone. I'll go with 
you" 

But Clay refused with a quick 
impatience. "Stay with the guard. 
Nothing's happened. Tom, you go- 
ing back to the house? We'll get no 
more trouble now. There's too many 
of us. Someone ought to be with 
Joy." " 

"I'm going," Arnold said. "Send 
Sieve in when you find him. Lew, 
come on with me." 

They loped Into the black valley 
mouth side by side, but aware of 
Tom Arnold's strict silence he held 
down the questions that crowded his 
mind. 

With the day's dust scrubbed from 
his face and his long hair watered 
back slick he went out into the hall 
and fumed to the Cross Ts family 
dining room. 

Owl-Head Jackson, the cook, 
came into the dining room from the 
kitchen carrying a heaped platter of 
food. "Lewi" He grinned. "You 
broomtailed maverick, It's, good to 
see that ugly face of yours again! " 

Prom the front room Joy called, 
"Pour a cup of coffee tor me, Owl- 
Head," and came on back. 

"Tell me about Wyoming!" she 
said. 

"That's a lot of country," he 
smiled. "What do you want to know?" 

"Everything! What It's like and 
what you do there." 

"Well, I lived in a dugout," he 
said, "in the bank of a creek arid 
spent most of my time fighting 
rats." 

"No" — she laughed — "I don't 
mean that. Aren't there some moun- 
tains?" 



"Oh, sure; mountains, high ones. 
Some of them with snow all the 
year. In summer the streams don't 
go dry there. I guess It's sort of a 
pretty place," he admitted. "I liked 
the pines." 

'Then it's beautiful. I'm going 
to love it. I know I will!" 

That stopped him. He put down 
his fork. "Joy, what do you mean?" 

Her cheeks were flushed; the sup- 
pressed excitement had turned her 
breathless. "I wanted to be the first 
to tell you. I asked Dad to let me. 
You don't know, do you?" 

"No," he said, "I don't know any- 
thing." 

It' burst from her then wildly. 
"I'm going north! We're all going. 
We're moving up there for good." 

"You don't mean with the herd." 

"Yesl" * 

He could only stare at her. There 
had been nothing of this in Tom's 
letter either; no more than that 
he was sending his longhorns on a 
drive north. Yet it wasn't his 
thought of the long trail up which 
few women had ever gone that held 
him silent, but the three of them. 
Clay and Joy and himself, riding 
that trail together. 

His silence brought a little scowl 
across her dark eyes. "What's the 
matter?" 

"Joy," he asked, "when are you 
and Clay*getting married?" 

Her lips parted and closed; the 
high color drained from her cheeks. 
When she spoke her voice was very 
quiet. "I don't know, Lew. Why?" 
She paused and looked away from 
him and then didn't wait for his an- 
swer. "He's been wanting it before 
we started. But I can't, and per- 
haps I'm not being fair. I'm just 
afraid, I guess." — — 

"Afraid of what?" 

She brought her eyes back to his 
face, and he could feel them trace 
the crescent mark on his forehead. 

"I don't know," she said. "We've 
waited too long. Too many things 




I'm just afraid, I guess." 



have happened now. Whether I'm 
married or not doesn't seem so im- 
portant any more." 

"I'm sorry, Joy." He reached 
across the table and took her two 
folded hands in his big fist, pressed 
them and let them go. 

In front of the big rock fireplace, 
Tom Arnold had done more' than 
wait He could hear the familiar 
sound of Lew Burnet's talk in the 
dining room, a slow and easy sound, 
and something restful and grateful 
had come over him with this knowl- 
edge that Lew Burnet was back. 

Thinking of Steve, Tom Arnold sat 
wholly still, held by a dead, heavy 
feeling compounded of loneliness 
and a father's defeat It was his 
own fault he guessed. For he knew 
himself for what he was — strict and 
unsparing, with a single-minded be- 
lief that a man was born into this 
rich new land to make the best use 
of his time. 

The talk in the dining room end- 
ed He heard the chairs scrape 
back and thought of another ambi- 
tion he'd had once and watched die. 
Then the two figures were pacing 
toward him, Joy with her band in 
Lew Burnet's arm, looking small 
and so much alive beside his 
straight high shape. Her cheeks 
Were flushed. A. >. understood 
what it was in the man that could 
make him watch her in an amused 
but intently steady way, and the old 
hope he'd had once rose in him 
again. 

He smiled. "You get filled up, 
boy?" 

"I did," Lew grinned. "It's worth 
a month's riding to get one of Owl- 
Head's meals!" 

Joy released his arm and sat down 
on a halved log with short legs at 
her father's knee. He ranged him- 
self beside the fireplace, its blaze 
warming him and a sense of com- 
fort sweeping over him powerfully. 
This was home. Here in this room 



was the peace of family life for 
more than forty years. 

With his pipe going he looked 
down and said, "Well, Tom, here I 
am. There's one thing I'd like to 
know first. Joy says you're moving 
north. I thought it was only a trail 
herd." 

Arnold nodded. "She's right 
We're leaving here for good." His 
head lifted sharply in an old chal- 
lenging fling of his gray hair. 

He said, "You needn't look so 
confounded, Lew! A man has moved 
before. And I don't own the Cross T 
any longer. The cattle are mine, 
yes, but not this." He waved into 
the room. "Nor the land." 

"Sold out?" 

"No." Arnold turned his head a 
little. "Joy, I'd like to talk with 
Lew alone." 

"Dad!" She sprang up and threw 
her arm across his shoulders. She 
shook him. "You can't go on keep- 
ing things back from me! What's 
the use? I'm not a little girl any 
more!" 

"Well, all right," he said to her. 
"You know most of what's hap- 
pened. You might as well hear the 
rest- 
She sat down again on the halved 
log with short legs and watched his 
face. 

"We had a bank robbery a month 
ago, Lew," he said. "At a bad 
time. Trail buyers had been here 
making up their herds for the north. 
The money they paid to a dozen Ox 
Bow cattlemen was on deposit in 
my vaults." 

It was characteristic of Lew Bur- 
net not to tell that he already knew 
this. He waited. 

Arnold's eyes centered themselves 
into the smoldering juniper logs. He 
said quietly, "I took the blame. It's 
my bank and these cattlemen are 
my friends. They've got only small 
outfits, and if they lose their money 
now it'll break them. I know by 
law I don't have to make it up. But 
I'm going to. I've already turned 
the ranch in for assets, appointed a 
new president and I'm out" 

"You pay a big price for your 
peace of mind, Tom." 

"It's all a man's got worth keep- 
ing," Arnold said. He sat back in 
his chair. "I'm making a new start 
in the north. That's the only rea- 
son, as far as anyone should know, 
why I'm leaving the Little Co- 
manche." 

"But* there's another?" 

The gray bead nodded. "Steve. 
A man was killed in town the night 
of the robbery, Rayburn, our sher- 
iff. Nobody knows who pulled the 
bank job or killed Rayburn, but 
some talk about Steve has reached 
my ears. I don't believe it. If I 
did I'd hang his hide on a fence! 
I do know he was off somewhere 
all that night He came back late 
the next day, drunk." 

On her low seat Joy had made no 
sound, but something brought Lew's 
gaze down to her and he saw the 
tight lines of fear and horror in 
her face. She looked only at her 
father, and then Tom Arnold's voice 
dropped all the way to an old man's 
deep bitterness. "I've done all I 
can to help that boy. I still won't 
admit his wildness has taken him 
as far as this talk says. But it 
brings home to me that he's gene 
out of my hands. There's only one 
more thing I can do, get him out 
of this country, away from the 
friends he's made here. The trail 
north is one job he can't shift out of. 
It'll make a man of him or break 
him, I'm pretty sure." 

"It will," Lew agreed. "I've seen 
it work both ways." 

"And then in Wyoming," Arnold 
said, "it's Steve that can make ■ 
new start, I hope. Not me. I'm 
too old now." 

"Dad, you aren't" Joy mur- 
mured. "What a thing to say I" 

Using a sliver of wood Lew ex- 
plored the hearthstone crack for a 
cricket, didn't find him and looked 
up to say, "There wasn't much in 
your letter, Tom. And I know less 
since I got here. Like that stampede 
tonight. I've been wondering what 
was behind it" 

"My beef contract" Arnold said. 
"You know what's happened to the 
price of longhorns up north?" 

"I do. Six hundred thousand head 
came up the trail last year. There'll 
be a million on the march, this 
spring. That's too many. Unless 
trail troubles thin it out a whole 
lot a man won't get more than ten 
dollars at the end. What does your 
contract call for?" 

"Three thousand bead at thirty. 
I deliver the Indian beef at Ogallala 
on the first of September. It's my 
own stuff I'm taking on to Wyom- 
ing." 

"Ninety thousand dollars," Lew 
figured. "That's a jack pot for youl 
You're lucky, Tom." 

But Arnold shook his bead. "I 
would be if my contract was direct 
with the government ft isn't The 
Indian Supply Company got a blan- 
ket award for the northern reserva- 
tions this year, and I bad to take a 
subcontract delivering to them. You 
can see the joker in that They 
handle all the money and pay me 
only when end if I reach Ogallala 
on September first 

"They signed with me five months 
ago. Now they want to back out 
A couple of their men came down 
here offering five thousand dollars 
to cancel my deal" 

(TO BE CONTINUED! 



Released by Western Newapaper Union. 

SPOILED FOOD 




Owing to the excellent food laws 
now in operation there are not many 
cases of sickness and death from 
spoiled foods, considering the great 
necessity of preserv- 
ing food for future 
use. 

In Hygela, the 
health magazine, 
published by the 
American Medical 
association, Mary C. 
Brown, Cedar Rap- 
ids, Iowa, states that 
. sight, smell and 
^ I common sense are 

'"' enough to enable 

Dr. Barton one to tell whether 
food is safe to eat. 
"Intelligent planning for the pur- 
chase of foods according to the fam- 
ily needs, plus a proper knowledge 
of how to care for foods not used 
immediately after they are bought 
how to protect 'left-overs' that must 
be stored from meal to meal and 
how to detect spoilage, will pay 
large dividends in the avoidance of 
unsafe foods and in protection for 
the family budget." 

The family cupboard is not a suit- 
able storage place for cooked meat 
— especially luncheon meats and 
cured meats. All meat should be 
kept in one of the coldest shelves in 
the refrigerator. 

Further, once meat is purchased 
it should be cooked within a few 
hours as the average "home" 're- 
frigerator is nowhere near as cold 
as the refrigerator from which the 
meat was obtained. 

Another suggestion from Mrs. 
Brown is that while "leftovers" 
cooked and eaten may seem safe 
and saving, nevertheless, preventing 
leftovers is safer and more saving. 
The housewife should study her 
needs carefully and have fewer left- 
overs. Leftovers should be heated 
again before serving which should be 
within 24 hours after the first cook- 
ing. 

B^>od that has an "off" or unde- 
sirable odor must not be used. Even 
boiling food with an "off" odor is 
not sufficient to make it safe. 

"If fermentation and gas appear, 
or there is mould on top of the food, 
discard the entire can — not simply 
the part that appears spoiled" 

The way to detect odors is to heat 
the food and smell it when it first 
becomes hot An odor is more no- 
ticeable when the lid is first lifted. 
If In doubt discard the foods 

Those afflicted with catarrh or oth- 
er conditions affecting the sense of 
smell and taste are not qualified to 
judge as to the fitness of food for 

eating. ,. 

• • » 

Sugar Gives Spurt 
Of Energy to Heart 



I have spoken before of the ex- 
periments conducted by Harvard re- 
search workers during the running 
of the Boston Marathon several 
years ago. The results showed that 
the amount of sugar present in the 
blood at the end of the race indicat- 
ed the condition of the runner. The 
greater the amount of sugar present 
in the blood, the better was the phys- 
ical condition of the runner and the 
nearer he was to being among the 
leaders at the finish. By having cer- 
tain runners take more sugar daily 
during the following year and during 
the race of that year, these runners 
not only finished in better condition 
but were higher up in the race than 
they were the previous year. 

Why is sugar— dextrose— so help- 
ful in giving energy to the muscles? 

In the Cincinnati Journal'of Medi- 
cine, Dr. Edward Podolsky, Brook- 
lyn, states that treatment by dex- 
trose Is one of the most valuable 
procedures in the treatment of heart 
disease. The chief reason why- dex- 
trose is so helpful in heart disease 
is that it supplies so readily the nec- 
essary food for the hard working 
heart. Another reason Is that dex- 
trose helps to dilate or open up the 
blood vessels so that it requires less 
effort for the heart to pump blood 
through them. 

Fortunately dextrose can be taken 
by mouth; the patient takes two or 
three ounces of sugar dissolved in a 
glass of water or weak tea three or 
four times daily for a period of two 
to three months. This produces a 
"lasting" effect 

When sugar cannot be given by 
mouth or by hypodermic injection 
it may be given in the form of an 
enema. Another method often used 
in hospitals is injecting the dextrose 
into a vein. 

The thought, then, when we are 
tired from muscular exercise or 
work, or in cases of a weak or failing 
heart is to use sugar or candy to 
Apply "quick" nourishment to the 
heart 

e a. e 

QUESTION BOX 

Q.— Please give me some details 
on the cause and cure of malaria. 

A.— The bit* ei certain mosquitoes 
deposits a parasite which destroys 
red blood cells. There are varieties 
of malaria according- to the time be- 
tween attacks. Quinine Is the treat- 
ment 

e e e 

Q.— What should the blood pres- 
sure be for a person 47 years old? 

A.— IM pros the age Is considered 
a safe 



un^ T SUNDAY 

International II SCHOOL 

•:• LESSON^ 

By HAROLD L. LUNDQUIST. D. D. 
Of The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago. 
Released by Western Newspaper Union. 



Lesson for February 6 



Lesson subjects and Scripture texts se- 
lected and copyrighted by International 
Council of Religious Education: uaed by 
permission. 



JESUS FEEDS THE MULTITUDES 

LESSON TEXT— Mark 6:35-44; 8:1-9. 

GOLDEN TEXT— I am the bread of 
Die: he that cometh to me thall never 
hunger: and he that beUeveth on me shall 
never thirst.— John' 8:33. 



Hungry! That word describes the 
crying need of the greater part of 
the world's population. Men who 
have vaunted themselves because of 
their ability and ingenuity have 
brought the nations of the earth into 
such awful confusion that even God's 
abundant provision cannot reach the 
needy ones. 

God is concerned about man's 
physical need just as truly as He is 
about spiritual needs. This story 
brings Christianity into action on a 
level that all will appreciate — the 
need of food for the body. It works 
there as it does everywhere. 

The supply of every need of man 
is God. "My God shall supply all 
your need according to his riches in 
glory by Christ Jesus" (Phil. 4:19). 
Countless, Christians have found It 
to be true that we may trust God- 
completely— and for everything. 

The stories of the feeding of the 
two groups of people show the wrong 
and the right attitude toward man's 
need. In two approaches to the 
problem the disciples were wrong. 
Then Christ showed them the right 
way. 

I. They Can Take Care of Their 
Own Need (6:35, 36). 

"Send them away" — that was the 
plea of the disciples when the multi- 
tude of those who had followed Him 
became hungry. The people were 
there because they were interested 
in Christ They had come in a hurry 
(v. 33) and had not brought food. 
The problem was on the disciples' 
hands, and they sought the easiest 
way out. Let them shift for them- 
selves— "Send them away." 

The church has followed their ex- 
ample in dealing with the social 
problems of the people down through 
the years. The result is that being 
denied fellowship, comfort, and help 
by a church which was too busy 
building up a vast organization or 
a beautiful order of worship, the 
common people have respond- 
ed to the appeal of political leaders 
who have provided a substitute for 
what the church should have given 
them. 

When Jesus put upon them the di- 
rect responsibility to feed the people, 
the disciples changed their "slogan" 
and said: 

II. We Should Like to Help, but 
We Cannot (6:37). 

Reckoning hastily on what a small 
boy had brought for his lunch (trust 
an alert boy to be ready!), the 
disciples soon demonstrated that it 
was impossible to feed this great 
throng. (See similar reasoning in 
Mark 8:4). 

Logic is such a devastating thing 
when it operates apart from faith In 
God. They were absolutely right in 
their reasoning and in their calcula- 
tions, but they had forgotten the one 
factor that really counted. Jesus was 
there, and Jesus is God, and God 
is omnipotent. 

As we face the need of the world 
now and after the war, we wonder 
how the peoples of other lands can 
be fed without depriving our own 
land of what it needs. It is a great 
problem, and we ought to pray for 
those who must work with it 

But let us not forget that all that 
we have comes from God, and that 
He is able to do "exceeding abun- 
dantly above all that we ask or 
think" (Eph. 3:20). The Christ who 
multiplied the loaves and fishes is 
our Living Lord today, and ready and 
able to do it again. 

III. Jesus Said, "I Have Com- 
passion on the Multitude" (6:38-44; 
8:1-9). 

He started right. Instead of shut- 
ting His heart against the tender de- 
sire to help, He let His love for 
the people control. Then instead of 
magnifying the difficulties. He mul- 
tiplied the provisions. And lo, there 
was enough for all, and to spare. 

"He commanded . . . and they 
did all eat" (w. 39, 42). When God 
speaks, all the limitations of the finite 
disappear, and the needs of men are 
fully met— with "twelve baskets full 
of fragments" left over! 

Note the orderly manner in which 
our Lord met this situation. Five 
thousand men, with women and chil- 
dren to swell the throng, were seat- 
ed on the grass. Jesus took the 
loaves and fishes and blessed them. 
You who forget to return thanks at 
the table, notice that quiet and mean- 
ingful act Then He broke the 
loaves and divided the fishes. No 
doubt they were multiplied as the 
disciples passed them out to the 
people. 

God is able to do that very thing 
even in our day. Perhaps not in 
just the same manner, but surely 
those who serve Him have marveled 
as they have seen that "little is 
much when God is in it" Let those 
who labor in difficult places with 
limited, resources take heart— end 
trust God. 

Note the care with which the frag- 
ments were collected tor future use. 
It took this war to teach America 

ar sha mefu lly wasteful it has been. 



T^CffiffiULCHffiU& 



I wisK ye \\%.d *- 

storied house. . 
Were tlvtys movintj 
( off some. where 
111 kfcve *n *ttic 

when Im old 
And keep- &. lot 
of heirlooms 
there. 




WNU Features. 



CLASSIFIED 

DEPARTMENT 



BOOKS 



CREMATION 



CREMATION 



IV tia ra s The Imtai of Year loved Oaat 

VTSIT THE NEW HIUSSX CHAPEL 

ts0OA.M.Ie4i00r.M. 

Writs frr DswriptM* BookUt 

CINCINNATI CREMATION CO. 

a. CU iHas mo .OUe 




Just 3 drops Penetro 
Noee Drops In each 
nostril help you 
breathe freer almost 
instantly. Relieve the 
head cold nasal misery. 
Only 36c— 2H times as 
much for 60c Caution: 
Use only as directed. 
Penetro Nose Draps 



' 



>Y0U WOMEN WHO SUFFER FROM L 

HOT FLASHES 

If you suffer from hot flashes, 
weak, nervous, cranky feelings, are 
a bit blue at tunes— due to the 
functional "middle-age" period 
peculiar to women— try Lydia E. 
Plnkham's Vegetable Compound 
to relieve such symptoms. Taken 
regularly — Plnkham's Compound 
helps build up resistance against 
such distress. It helps nature! 
Also a fine stomachic tonic. Fol- 
low label directions. 

LYDIflLPINKHAM'ScoSi^Ko 



WNU— E 



Kidneys Must 
Work Well- 



Foe Yon To Feel Well 

M boon erery day. T dayt every 
wok, uw stopping, the kidneys fitter 
wssts matter trom too blood. 

If more people wore aware of how the 
kidneys most constantly romoro sur- 
eras Buid. azotes acids and other waste 
matter that eanaot stay fat the blooej 
without Injury to health, there would 
be better understanding of «»y the 
whole srstem la upset when kidneys fal 
as) feaenoa properly. 

Burning, scanty or too frequent nrlna- 
ttea eemofimas wans that snwtrhlae 
Is wrong; Tea aaay suffer netting back- 
ache, hsa d s rh sa, rtlsein ass, rheumatle 
petes, swtttnfup at n^hhvswsUlna. 

War net try Dose's Mitt Toe wSJ 
be mast a tseelliliis recommended the 
•7s2«7 ewer. Bee.', stimulate tbil enT 
Hon ef the kidneys and help them at 
Saab estt poisonous waitress the 

At aO arte at 



DOaN SPILLS 



RELIGIOUS BOOKS — BIBLES 
Free Illustrated catalogs. OXFORD CO., 
Bex SI, Q. P. O., New York, N. T. 



Artificial Languages 

Since 1600, some 350 artificial 
languages have been devised and 
proposed as an international auxil- 
iary tongue, but only 6, all created 
in the past 65 years, have achieved 
importance— Esperanto, Ido, Inter- 
lingua, Novial, Occidental and Vo- 
lapuk. 



Bald African Women 
It's the style among women of 
certain tribes in Africa to pull all 
of their hair from their heads and 
wear huge festoons of wire as ear- 
rings. 



Initialed Locusts 
The outline of the letter "W" 
can be seen on each wing of the 
17-year locust. \ 



Beware Coughs 

from common colds 

That Hang On 

Creomulsion relieves promptly be- 
cause it goes right to the seat of the 
trouble to help loosen and expel 
germ laden phlegm, and aid nature 
to soothe and heal raw, tender, in- 
flamed bronchial mucous mem* 
branes. Tell your druggist to sell yon 
a bottle of Creomulsion with the un- 
derstanding you must like the way It 
quickly allays the cough or you are 
to have your money back. 

CREOMULSION 

for Coughs, Chest Colds, B ronchiris * 



For the Preservation ft 

Of the American •& ft 

Way of Life ft ft -fr 

BUY U. S. WAR BONDS! 






Thursday, February 3, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 




INTERESTING patchwork is here 
•*■ for your doing. Arrowheads of 
color and white are h%ld together 
by diamond bouquets appliqued 
over the joinings. It's new — it's 
different— it's the Indian Arrow- 
head pieced quilt. » 
, • • • 

Sixty-tour blocks and a six-Inch border 
make a quilt of 101-inch size. The pat- 
tern with accurate cutting guides and 
complete directions may be bud as Z9594. 
IB cents. Send your order to: 



AUNT MARTHA 

207W Westport Rd., Kansas City, Mo. 
Enclose IS cents for each pattern 

desired. Pattern No 

Name ••«••• 

Address 



In the Navy a floor is a "deck," 
doors are . "bulkheads," down- 
stairs is "below," and a cigarette 
is a "Camel." At least, Camel is 
the favorite cigarette among Navy 
men, as it is among men in the 
Army, Marines, and Coast Guard. 
(Based on actual sales records 
from service men's stores.) And 
a carton of Camels is a favorite 
gift. Though there are now Post 
Office restrictions on packages to 
overseas Army men, you can still 
send Camels to soldiers in the 
U. S., and to men in the Navy, 
Marines, and Coast Guard wher- 
ever they are. — Adv. 



NOTHING CAN DO 
MORE FOR YOU 

to the entire field of aspirin than St. Joseph 
Aspirin. None faster, none safer. Tne 
world's largest seller at 10c. Also sold 
in economy sizes — 36 tablets, 20c, 100 
tablets, 35c Demand St Joseph Aspirin. 



Indian Monument Turns 
A 36-foot statue of an American 
Indian in the court house at St. 
Paul, Minn., is rigged with mo- 
tors and clock work so that it re- 
volves once a day. 



MISERIES OF 
X 




Now . . . here's wonderful home- 
proved medication that works 
2 ways at once to relieve distressed 
Child's cold-even whits he sleeps I 

Rub throat, chest and back 
with Vicks VapoRub at bedtime. 
Instantly VapoRub starts to re- 
lieve coughing spasms, muscular 
soreness or tightness, and Invito 
restful sleep. Often by morning, 
most of the misery is gone. 

For baby's sake, try VapoRub 
when colds strike. It must be good, 
because when colds. 

e it is whatW|£K5 
• W VapoRub 



most mothers use. 



• OUR COMIC SECTION • 



PETER 




rue mail 

ALWAYS 

kmvM 






s 
o 

M 
E 
B 
O 
D 
Y 
'S 



s 

T 
E 
N 
O 
G 



WNTJ reaturaa, 



/ntXIR BIRTHDAY IS 

I COMIMS AMD rv/E BEEN 

\ THINKING HOW NICE 

IT IS TO HAVE tOU 

^WITH US AGAIN 

T 




Speedy Duck Hawk 

The duck hawk can fly 180 miles 
an hour. 



Sms ■*< tsail jasr Day— Stt attar It law 

Don't put off getting C-2228 to re- 
lieve pain of muscular rheumatism 

and other rheumatic pains. Caution: 
Use only as directed. First bottle 
purchase price back if not satisfied. 
60o and {LOO. Today, buy C-2228. 



BABIES 



ON SCOTT' 



•••BECAUSE IT'S RICH 
IN VITAL ELEMENTS* 

Good-tasting Scott's Emulsion helps 
buOd strong bones, sound teeth, and 
stamina ; helps build resistance to colds. 
It's rich in natural A & D Vitamins* that 
assy be lacking In the diet. And-ifs 4 
times easier to digest than plain cod Over 
•HI So give it daily. Buy at all druggists I 

I* Maty betas 



<% /'/SCOTT S 
|li EMULSION 

I- 



nooK 



P 



O 
P 



I ONCE SWUNG 
THE RANGE-FINDER 
ROUND SO HARD 
I KNOCKED A 
FELLOW OUT | 




By 

J. Millar 

Watt 



WNU 







A - 



' V q6gftt.Ua>* by Th. ti.ll Syndic.!., ly ), 



POP PATS 




Sonny— Dad, what's your birth- 
stone? 

Daddy— I'm not sure, son, but I 
think it's a grindstone. 

Foreign Trade 

American— What 'nese are you, 
Japanese, Javanese or Chinese? 

Chinaman— What 'kee are you, 
monkey, donkey or Yankee? 

Spank Him! 

Jones — Your son threw a piece of 
Coal at me I 

Smith— He did? Well, I'll speak to 
him about being so wastef till 



, Air-Conditioning 

Electrician (examining ice-box 
which had been using too much cur- 
rent)— You're a new cook here, 
are n't you? How do you l ike this 
ice-box? 

Cook— I like it One. I hold the 
door open and it cools off the whole 
kitchen. 

Small Target 

Guide— There's a leopard. Hurry, 
shoot him on the spot. 

Hunter— Which spot? Be more 
specific I 

Definition 

Harry— What's a panhandler? 
Jerry— That's a person who mas- 
sages faces! 

High Man 

Passenger— I should think you'd be 
happy as a king when you're flying. 

Pilot— Much happier than that— 
I'm an ace! 



sImple explanation 




Harry— But why do you say you'd 
rather be a painter than a doctor? 

Jerry— Well, a painter can always 
tear up his mistakes, but a doctor 
has to bury his. 

Sure Care 

Patient— Nurse, I think my breath 
is getting Shorter. 

Nurse— Just take things easy, the 
doctor will soon put a stop to that 

Boiling Pto Queen 

Smith— Why do you wish your wife 
was like Venus? 

Jones— So she wouldn't have 
arms to throw things at me. 




»f IMI 
STORY 



moajfrew w. 
•URwtf S 



, Aaotuirrf NmMn 
WNU fimixtnx 



WHAT PETER RABBIT FOUND 




Every day learn something new; 
That's the only way to do. 

DETER RABBIT found that out a 
*long, long time ago. It is one 
reason he is so curious about every- 
thing. The trouble with Peter is 
that when he learns something new 
today he straightway forgets what 
he learned yesterday, and, of course, 
this is no way to do. Peter has to. 
learn a lesson a great many times 
before it will stick in that queer 
little head of his, and so, sometimes, 
he gets into the same kind of troUlfle 
over and over again. Now, Reddy 
Fox never has to have more than 
on? lesson. He never forgets, and 
this is why everybody thinks him so 
smart. 

Peter was learning something new 
and very interesting now as he sat 
on top of the house of Paddy the 
Beaver. It was how Paddy got air 
to breathe. You see, ever since 
Peter* had climbed, up on the roof 
he had smelled Paddy the Beaver,, 
smelled him so strong that it had 
seemed as if Paddy must be right 
close to him, Peter had sniffed and 
sniffed. There could be no doubt, 
not the least teeny-weeny bit, that 
he smelled Paddy. You know, ev- 
ery one of the little forest and 
meadow people has a smell just his 
own. A little of it is left in their 
footsteps, and it is by this that they 
track one another and know where 
to find each other. 

Peter knew right away that he 
smelled Paddy the Beaver, but 
where under the sun could Paddy 
be? He looked and he looked and 
he looked, and then, just as he was 
giving up hope of finding out any- 
thing, he made a discovery. What 
was it? Why, it was that right in 
the very middle of the roof where 
Old Man Coyote had dug away the 
snow and tried to break in were 
tiny little holes that went down be- 
tween the sticks of which the roof 




\jt «•••.,.. (.», 



"He gets fresh air through these 
Uttle holes." 

was made, and out of these tiny 
holes was coming the warm air 
which Paddy had breathed and 
which brought up with it the strong 
smell of Paddy himself. Peter 
chuckled as he thought of how that 
smell must have set Old Man Coy- 
ote almost crazy, for he knew that 
in the winter Old Man Coyote, like 
Reddy and Granny Fox, often must 
go hungry. And big, fat Paddy would 
make a fine meal for any of them. 
Paddy knew that, too, so he made 
sure his house was very hard and 
strong, so that no one could break in. 

"I wish I could have seen him 
trying to dig his way in and not 
being able to, and all the time smell- 
ing Paddy just as 1 do now," thought 
Peter. "My, but Paddy is smart! 
Yes, sir, he is smart Why, it must 
be that he gets fresh air to breathe 
through these little holes, and all 
the time I've been wondering and 
wondering how he could live in a 
house without any opening except 
under water. He plastered the side 
walls and most of the roof with 
mud, which Jack Frost has frozen 
as hard as stone, but right where 
these little holes are there isn't any 
mud, and it must be that he left it 
this way just so that the air could 
get through. Now, I wonder how 
he knew enough to do that. I 
wouldn't have. I just wouldn't have 
thought 1 anything about it." 

And this is quite true, for Peter 
never thinks ahead, That is why 
he is so happy-go-lucky. He says 
that thinking ahead makes his head 
ache. And so he takes things as 
they come, stuffs himself when 
there is plenty to eat, and goes hun- 
gry when there isn't; gets out of one 
scrape only to tumble right into an- 
other; gets a terrible fright and for- 
gets all about it three minutes after 
it is over. Nothing worries Peter 
for very long. So it is no wonder 
that it was hard work for him to 
understand how anyone could be so 
thoughtful of the future and work so 
hard to prepare for it as does Paddy 
the Beaver. 



CANDID SHOT 



Customer — How do you want me 
to sit for this picture? Do you want 
me to just look natural? 

Photographer— No, look intelli- 
gent! 



A.W.O.L. 

Sarge— Now, in case of emergen- 
cy, the first thing you do is put on 
the brake. 

Recruit— I thought that came with 
the truck! 



PATTERNS 



SEWING CIRCLE 





Due to an unusually large demand and 
current war conditions, slightly mora tlma 
Is required in filling orders for a few of 
the most popular pattern numbers. 



A Gift Set 

P"OULD any intimate gift be 
^ -J more acceptable than this slip 
of smooth contour and the match- 
ing panties? Lace edging puts both 

these pieces into the luxury class! 
• • • 
Barbara Bell Pattern No. 1912 is de- 
signed for sizes 11, 13, IS, 17 and 19. Cor- 
responding bust measurements 29, 31, 33, 
35 and 37. Size 13 (31) slip and panties re- 
quire 33a yards 39-inch material; 4 yards 
lace to trim. 



Versatile 

TJERE'S a jumper and jacket to 
*■ *■ play many roles in your ward- 
robe! The jumper with a blouse 
makes a smart office costume. 
The jumper with jacket is smart 

for shopping, travel and office, too. 
• • • 
Barbara Bell Pattern No. 1918 Is de- 
signed for sizes 12, 14, 16, 18, 20; 40 and 
42. Corresponding bust measurements 30, 
32, 34, 36, 38, 40 and 42. Size 14 (32) en- 
semble requires, with short sleeves, 4% 
yards 39-inch material. 



Soldier on Trial 

An American soldier is allowed, 
before his trial by a general 
court-martial, to examine the evi- 
dence and the witnesses of. the 
prosecution. During the trial, at 
which he may be represented by 
his own civilian lawyer, the de- 
fendant is not required to testify 
under oath if he chooses to make 
an unsworn statement. 

In such a case, the soldier, after 
telling his story in his own words, 
may not be subjected to cross- 
examination. 



SEWING CIRCLE PATTERN DEPT. 
530 South Wells St. Chlcafo 

Enclose 20 cents In coins for each 
pattern^ desired. ^ 

Pattern No Size 

Name 

Address 



DISCOVERY SCOLDS* RELIEF 

(home medicated mutton suet) — which 
grandma used for coughing — nasal con- 
gestion, muscle aches of colds— teaches 
modern mothers to follow her example. 
So their families get relief from these 
colds' miseries with Penetro, the salve 
with modern medication in a base con- 
taining old fashioned mutton suet. 26c, 
double supply 35c. Demand Penetro. 



FALSE TEETH 

AND A 4£$, 

GRAND SMILE !% 



YOU CAN LAUGH, TALK 
AND EAT, FREE OF PLATE 
EMBARRASSMENT 

It's so easy to enjoy all-day confidence 
when your plates are held firmly and safely 
in place by this "comfort-cushion" — a 

dentist's formula. 



I. Dr. Wernef • Pow- 
der lets you enjoy 
solid foods, avoid em- 
barrassment of loose 
plates. Helps prevent 
lore gums. 



J. Recommended by 
dentists for SO yean. 
S. Economical: small 
amount lasts lonrar. 
4. Pure and harmless 
—pleasant tasting. 



All oWw«t»- 30*. Mo*.y bodr H sol eh%kW. 



^i Dr. Wernet's Powdet 

LARGEST SELLING PLATE 
POWDER IN l Ml iVORl [i 



— Buy War Savings Bonds — 




MANY MEN are persecuted by 
lumbago or other nagging muscle 
pains— especially after exposure to 
cold or dampness. If every sufferer 
could only know about sourrom 
Liniment! In addition to methyl 
salicylate— a most effective pain- 
relieving agent. Soretone acts like 
cold hoot to speed relief:— 
I. Quickly Soretone act* to en- 
hance local circulation, • 
Z. Check mutcular cramps. 

3. Help reduce local ttcelling. 

4. Dilate surface capillary blood 



For fastest action, let dry, rub fa 
again. There's only one Soretone— 
insist on it for Soretone results. 
SO*. Big bottle, only $1. 



SORETONE 

soothes fast with 

COLD HEAT* 
ACTION 

in coses of 

MUSCULAR LUMBAGO 
OR BACKACHE 



•a* tt Ml six sr 

MUSCULAR PAINS 

•sstsssah 

SORE MUSCLES 




^ags 



WALTON ADVERTISES 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY S, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



^Estab lished I n 19 14) 



KENTON-CAMPBELL COURD2R — Established 1M7 

(Consolidated June 1, 1938) 



Entered as Second Class Matter January 1, 1916 
at the Post Office at Walton, Kentucky. 



MRS. J. R. WALLACE and WILLIAM W. JARRELL 
EDITORS and PUBLISHERS 



Foreign Advertising Representative: 

AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 



NATIONAL €DITORIAL_ 
SS OC1ATION 




Notices and Cards of Thanks: 
B5 words and less, 50 cents. Over 
S5 words $1.00. 



MEMBER 




CONCORD 



"Humble yourselves in the Lord, 
end he shall exalt you." 

Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Robinson 
spent Thursday at Ludlow with 
their daughter and family. 

Mrs. Will Crouch of Glencoe 
and her sister, Mrs. Bessie Riley 



of Newport spent Friday at Ross 
Chapmans, in the afternoon they 
visited Mrs. M. O. Jones, that 
being their old home place. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Chapman, 
daughter Mrs. Vevie Webster and 
son Leo were visiting at the C. D. 
Hughes home Sunday after Sun- 
day School. 



<r 



SERVICE FOR 25 YEARS! 

OUR REPUTATION IS YOUR PROTECTION 

R. Michels Welding 
Company - 

722 Washington St. Covington COlonial 0670 



DIXIE'S FINEST JEWELRY STORE 

FEATURING RELIABLE QUALITY 

AT ASSURED LOWEST PRICES 

icBOCEETTeo, 



DIXIE HIGHWAY at Graves 

^ERLANGER 

MANAGER.: 0EOR.CE FLEMING 




with modern stores in : 
MT. WASHINGTON • CHEVIOI 
NORWOOD • MAOISONVII 




PUBLIC SALE 

I have sold my farm and will sell to the high bidder, 
my stock and tools on the Charter Chapel Road, 1 



mile east of Fiskburg, on 

SAL, FEB. 12 th 

.. 10:30 C.W.T. 
LOOK FOR SIGN 

STOCK 
1 Jersey cow, 7 years old, fresh in March; 1 Rone 
cow, fresh in March; 3 Holestin cows, fresh in fall, 
good milkers; 60 bales of Timothy hay; 70 bales 
of Alfalfa hay; 2-10 gal. milk cans; 1 corn crusher; 
1 cream seperator, large size, Delavel; 1 five shovel 
plow; 1 jumper plow; 1 single A harrow; 1 rabbit 
coop; 1 grinding stone; axes, cross cut saws and 
all kinds of small tools; and one 4 year old Apple 
Grey Horse, broke. 

FURNITURE 
1 air tight heater, extra good; 2 linoleum rugs; 3 
iron beds and springs and mattress ; 1 kitchen table 
and chairs; 2 odd tables; 3 stand tables; 2 rockers; 
1 old parlor set, 100 years old; 1 piano, 1 good iron 
kittle; 1 Rayo lamp; 2 gas lamps; 1 dresser and all 
kinds of other furniture. - 

TERMS CASH 

E. E. BEIGHLE 

OWNER 

HARRY JOHNSON, Auct.— Phone Ind. 6196 

J. B. DOAN, Clerk 



A large crowd of relatives and 
friends ga thered at- Concord Sunr 



day afternoon' for the funeral of 
Mr. Bill Beach of Verona. Bro. 
Kirtley Johnson was in charge of 
the services. Mr. Beach was killed 
by a train above the Verona cross- 
ing on the track Thursday. He 
was 82 years old. The family have 
our sympathy. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Callahan of 
Price Hill, Cincinnati were calling 
at John Kannadys Sunday after- 
noon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Rex and 
family of Ludlow were visiting 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. N. 
Robinson here Sunday evening, 
they were trying their new car 
out. 

Miss Eula Wilhoite of Washing- 
ton D. C. has been visiting her 
father here for awhile, Mr. C. D. 
Wilhoite. 

Mr. and Mrs. Beyhimer and 
little daugher of Zion Station 
were calling at Ross Chapman's 



Sunday afternoon and all attend- 
ed he funeral at Concord. 



The W. M. S. will meet with 
Mrs."D. R. Chapman and daughter 
the 2nd Wednesday in February. 
All members are urged to be pre- 
sent. Any visitors welcome. 

The Y. W. A's. and Sunbeams 
will meet at the church Saturday 
afternoon, all come that can. 

Sunday School each Sunday 
morning, everyone welcome. 



VERONA 



Can you 
Drive a Car? 



When you were a kid, did 
you always pester to "go 
along" on every ride? and 
now, do you get a kick out of 
handling: the wheel like a 
man? 

Women with mechanical 
ability are needed in the 
WAC at once. Other skills are 
needed too. And untrained 
women can learn skills that 
will be useful all their lives. 
239 types of Army jobs need 
Wacs to fill them. 

Get full details at the near- 
est U .S. Army Recruiting 
Station (your local post office, 
will give you the address). Or 
write: The Adjutant General, 
Room 4415, Munitions Build- 
ing, Washington, D. C. 



The following ladies attended 
the W. M. S. of the Baptist 
Church, held last Thursday . at 
the Latonia Baptist Church: Mrs. 
Lorena Myers, Mrs. Grace 
Renaker, Mrs. Ura Roberts, Mrs. 
Alice Chapman, Mrs. L. Belle 
Elliston, Mrs. Maude Wilson and 
Mrs. Pattie Waller. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Lamn of 
Latonia and Mr. and Mrs. Arch 
Noel spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. J. B. Lamm. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Waller 
helped Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Lamm 
strip tobacco Wednesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Harris and 
grandson spent Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. Alfred Kemper and son 
of Warsaw. 

Uncle Billy Beach who was 
killed by a train Thursday p. m. 
last week was buried at Concord 
Sunday afternoon. 

_ — 

UNION V 



Mrs. Maggie Clarkson's many 
friends were glad to see her out 
again last week. 

Mrs. Joe Ryan and daughter 
spent Monday with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. R. K. Newman. 

Little Jimmie and Kathleen 
Noe are suffering from severe 
colds at this time . i ; 

Many ladies of the Union Bap- 
tist Church attended the Group 
Meeting held on January 27th at 
Latonia Baptist Churchy *jj 

Mr. Prank Sraffer of Walton 
Route 2 is confined to his home 
with the ful. We hope for him a 
very speedy recovery. 

Mrs. William Greenup and 
daughter Sue wefe ' visiting Mr. 




WE KEEP YOU ROLLIN' 



Wherever you service men 
arc goin'-in line of duty or 
on leave— we consider it our 
important job to get you 
there, and back. 

Greyhound's advertisin' is 
askio' Mr. and Mrs. Public 
NOT to ride soyou can. Sure, 



the buses are still crowded,' 
butwe're tryin* hard to servo 
all men in uniform. 

After the war, we'll make: 
everybody happy. Then you 
will discover again that you 
see more, save more and en-, 
joy more by Greyhound bus. 

PS. Don't forget— Buy aa extra War Bond this month! 



SOUTHEASTERN 

i GREYHOUND 



WINTER FARM NEEDS 

Anchor White Enameled Coal Range $69.00 

Warm Morning Circulating Coal Heater $97.50 

Athens 100 lb. size Magazine Heater $50.00 

Anchor Brick-lined Hot Blast Heaters, 3 sizes $31, $39, $46 

All Sizes Oak Coal Heaters .....^., $13.00 op 

All Sizes Wood Drum Heaters .$2.75 np 

Perfection Portable Kerosene Heaters $7.95 

January Electric Chick Hovers ' $36.00 

200 Watt & 800 Watt Electric Units to build you own 

brooders $4.95 & $6.95 

, 1-3-5 and 8 Gallon Poultry Fountains 

Poultry Feeders on legs — 10 Gallon Milk Cans 

5 Gallon Kerosene Can full Motor Oil ..• « $4.50 

National & Burpee Pressure Cookers — Cold Pack Canners 

Red Jacket and Dayton Electric Water Systems 

Linoluem Rugs, sizes 6x9 to 9x15 — Window Shades 

Electric Wire and Material for Farm Wiring 

Galvanized Water Pipe and Fittings — 30 Gal. Range Boilers 

Complete Line of Harness — Bale Ties 

Sled Soles & Round Iron — Hay Carriers, Track and Forks 

Barb Wire & Poultry Netting 

Tobacco Seed & Plant Bed Fertilizer 

Dr. Hess Poulry and Stock Tonic * 





WALION 



KENTUCKY 



and Mrs. 
afternoon. 



Elmer Noe Sunday 



The Luther Wagner family 
moved last Tuesday to the farm 
of Mr. J. A. Fothergill on Rice 
Pike. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Weaver 
and children visited her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Bristow and 
family last Saturday evening. 

We extend a hearty welcome to 
the Drysdale family who are the 
new tenants of Mrs. Katherine 
Kearns. 

Mrs. J. A. Huey is visiting 4 ln 
Louisville the guest of her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. John Taylor and family. 

Little Misses Doreta Jones and 
Creptal Masters are knitting an 
afghan for the Red Cross. We 
congratulate them for the interest 
shown in this worthy cause. 



GLENCOE R. 1 



Mr. and Mrs. Elbert Gross of 
Carrollton called on Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Ell Saturday. ' 

Mrs. Hester Duncan spent one 
day last week with Mrs. Bess 
Ringo. 

Mrs. Pearl Lindsay and Mr. and 
Mrs. Elf rie Henderson were 
shopping in Covington Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Wilson of 
Owen County visited In the Gordy 
and Smith home on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fonnie Arresmith 
and daughter of Oakley, Ohio 
were week-end guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Elfie Henderson. 

Mrs. Floyd Peak and son visited 
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Spencer 
and children on Friday. 

Leonard Hon has been ill with 
a severe cold. 



W. E. TAII, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 

Specializing In the 

correction and 

protection of 

EYESIGHT 




Mrs. Pearl Lindsay visited Mr. 
and Mrs. Effie Henderson a part 
of last week. 

Misses Hazel and Dorothy Hon 
of Covington spent the week-end 
with their father, Alva Hon. 



Tom Spencer and brother Earl 
have sold their farm to Mr. 
Bogardus of, Warsaw. 

Mrs. Bess, Ringo spent .Sunday 
afternoon with her mother, Mrs 
Hester Duncan. 



HALLMARK 

VALENTINE GREETING CARDS 

Stationery — Office Supplies — Autographic 
Register Supplies 

STEWART-CARR 

505 Madison Avenue Covington, Ky. 



SAVE 



IN 



FEBRUARY 



27 E. 7th St 

COVINGTON, KT. 



CLEARANCE 



EXCELLENT VALUES 

COPPIN'S 

MADISON AT 7th COVINGTON, KY. 



BIG CASH SAVINGS 

OFFERED 

ALL POULTRY MEN 

Fill in this credit check now and save up to 15 per cent. Chicks will 

be bought early again this year, and we advise you to reserve 

your favorite shipping date so that you will not 

be disappointed. 

MONEY SAVED IS MONEY EARNED 

Good on any breeds shown on price list, but not good when less than 

100 chicks are ordered. ' 

NON-SEXED $10.50 
BLOOD-TESTED STOCK I/??? 



White Plymouth Rocks 
Barred Plymouth Rocks 
S. C. Rhode Island Reds 
R. C. White Wyandottes 
New Hampshire Reds 
S. C. White Leghorns 



J> 



Good only when returned to Fnl-O-Pep Feed Store, 
512 Pike Street, Covington, Ky. (Send your own 
cheek or money order for difference covering full 
amount of order. 



PRINT NAME AND ADDRESS 



PAT TO THE 
ORDER OF 



*1 



ON OB BE. 
FORE MARCH 1. 1944 

.00 Credit for each 100 
chicks ordered 



ADDRESS 



Fill in total 
number chicks 
ordered here 



FUL-O-PEP FEED STORE 

By Hugo Lang 



WE SELL DR. SALSBURY'S POULTRY REMEDIES, POULTRY 
FEEDERS, WATER FOUNTS, ETC. 

FUL-O-PEP FEED STORE 



512 PDXE STREET 

COVINGTON, 

KT. 



J&f dd/i/k'HJ 



! f a; 1 m srnvicr 



HEMLOCK 9168 

Open Sundays Till 

Noon 



*"T 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1944 



SOCIAL AND 




WALTON ADVERTISER 



7T 



^M««4fwiM^KWki 






Mrs. Mary Rector, Mrs. N. E. 
Northcutt and Mrs. Katie Hank- 
lnson were shopping in Covington 
Tuesday. 

Mrs. E. O. Webster and daugh- 
ter have as guest this week, her 
mother, Mrs. Jones from English, 
Ky. 

. Mrs. N. E. Northcutt and daugh- 
ters were dinner guests of Mrs. 
Mary Howe and Thelma Smith 
Sunday. 

■ Mrs. L. A. Johnson and daugh- 
ter were week-end guests of her 
sister, Mrs. Walter Moser, Mr. 
Moser and daughter of Nicholson. 

Loretta Johnson was the week 
end guest of her cousin, Nellie 
Piske of Nicholson. 



PERSONAL. 



•:■ 



*•»* *% ••*»*%+%*• m»S^ fm %w* j L»mm 



Mrs. Louis Schawab and Mr. 
Ben Menke were called to the 
hospital Monday by the illness of 
Mrs. Bernard Menke. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Gaines, Mr. 
and Mrs. Marvin Gaines of Wal- 
ton and Mrs. Sarah Edwards of 
Covington were the Sunday even- 
ing dinner guests of their sister, 
Mrs. Glena Rose Gaines Wyatt in 
Pt. Mitchell. 



Mrs. Evelyn Ross and daughter 
of Covington and Helen Mann of 
Cincinnati were the week-end 
guests of their parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Clifford Mann and Ruth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Darling and 
son were Sunday guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. C. L. Gaines and family. 

Mrs. Ted Anderson of Ashland, 
Ky. is spending a week with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clayton 
Percival of Walton and Nicholson 
Highway and other relatives. 

Mrs. C. L. Gaines visited friends 
at Crescent Springs Tuesday. 

Mrs. Mary Stephens is ill at her 
home on Main St. 

Mrs. C. C. Pruett of the Walton- 
ian Hotel is on the sick list. 



USED CARS-20 EAST FOURTH ST. 

Covington COlonial 3884 
1937 Ford Coach ... $325 

1939 Hudson Coach $675 

1935 Ford 4-Door Sedan $175 

1937 Ford Coach $295 

1937 DeSota Sedan ... $375 

1940 DeSota Sedan, 7-passenger $1250 

1937 (Two) Studebaker Coupes ........ $350 

""' Oldsmobile Coach - $375 



1937 Dodge Coach 

1936 Cadillac 

1939 Hudson 4-door 

1937 Chrysler Sedan 



$350 
$325 
$695 
$295 



1939 Dodge 4-door Sedan $695 

1936 Packard Sedan $275 

1937 Packard Coupe $345 

1936 Chevrolet Sedan $245 

1938 Willys Sedan $325 

65 MORE FROM $60 UP 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 



ORDINANCE NO 

An ordinance providing for the 
sale of a Franchise by the town 
of Walton, Kentucky, for the pur- 
pose of constructing, maintaining 
and operating an Electric Dis- 
tribution System therein. 

THE BOARD OP TRUSTEES OF 
THE TOWN OF WALTON, 
KENTUCKY, DO ORDAIN AS 
FOLLOWS: 

Section 1— That the town clerk 
adyertise in two successive weekly 
issuesVof the Walton Advertiser 
next preceeding day of sale, that 
he will on the 11th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1944, up to twelve o'clock, 
noon, receive sealed bids for a 
Franchise to be clearly described 
in such advertisement as "A Fran- 
chise for constructing, maintain- 
ing and operating an Electric 
Light, Heat and Power Plant in 
the town of Walton, Kentucky, for 
a period of Twenty (20) years; 
with the right reserved to, the 
town to reject any or all bids." 



Section 96.020 of KRS provides: 

(1) "Each person desiring to 
bid for the franchise offer- 
ed for sale under KRS 
96.020 shall first deposit 
-with the proper officer of 
the city, cash or a certified 
check equal to five per cent 
of the fair estimated cost 
of the plant required %o 
render the service. The de- 
posit shall be forfeited to 
the city in case the bid is 
accepted and the bidder 
fails for thirty days after 
the confirmation of the 
sale, to pay the price bid 
and to give a sufficient 
bond in a sum equal 'to one 
fourth of the fair estimated 
cost of the plant to be 
erected. The bond shall be 
conditioned to be enforcible 
in case the person giving 
it falls, within a reasonable 
time, to establish a suitable 
plant for rendering the ser- 
vice and begin rendering 
the service in the manner 
set forth in the terms of 
the sale." 
(2) -"This section shall not 
apply to a person already 
owning, "in a city other 
than a city of the first 
class, a plant and "equip- 
ment sufficient to render 
the service required under 
the "franchise". 
When bids are so received for 
such franchise, the town clerk shall 
hold same, sealed, until the next 
regular meeting of the board of 
trustees of the town, when and 
where all such bids shall be open- 
ed and examined by the board of 



3 >Q 



EYE STRAIN 

Are you conscious of a 

strain when you read fine 

print* 

Perhaps you need glasses. 

Consult us today. 

L J. METZGER 

Optometrist OpttctM 

Ml Madison Ave. 

Covingtoii 

Serving Northern Kentucky 
With Comfortable Eyesight 



.....v.y.-,...- .... ........... : , 

— 



' 



HELP 'EM FINISH 
THE JOB! 




Buy EXTRA 
War Bonds Now! 

Everywhere in this global war, our 
armed forces are relentlessly pressing 

the offensive against the enemy. 

Thanks to their heroic efforts, total So no matter what your bond buying 

victory is undoubtedly closer but has been in the past, step it up, 

military leaders warn us this is no increase it, buy at least one extra 

tjme for donning rose-colored glasses. $100 bond during the Fourth War 

The decisive battles are still 

to be fought. Millions of 

dollars worth of equipment 

must be made and delivered 

to the fighting fronts. There 

can be no let-up in the,fiow 

of arms our men must have 

to overwhelm and destroy 

the enemy. ' 



trustees; and if no acceptable bid 
is received, reject all bids; but if j 
an acceptable bid is found, said 
board shall so declare" by ordin- 
ance or resolution then and there 
adopted, and sell said franchise 
to the accepted bidder, provided 
he has fully complied with, or 
exempted by, said section 96.020 
KRS above; and the deposits of 
all unsuccessful bidders shall be 
immediately returned to them 
after such franchise is sold, or all 
bids rejected. 

Section 2 — 

(a) That the purchase of this 
franchise shall authorize 
and permit the purchaser, 
his successors and assigns, 
to construct, maintain and 
operate a general distribut- 
ing Electric system in the 
town of Walton, Kentucky, 
with full right to occupy 
any or all of the streets, 
alleys, avenues and-or 
public places of the town as 
now laid out, or may here- 
after during the life of this 
franchise, be opened and 
dedicated to public use, 
with its poles, wires, guy- 
wires and any other neces- 
sary line equipment for the 
continuous period of twenty 
(20) years from and after 
the date of his or its pur- 
chase of this franchise. 

(b) In the construction of such 
Electric system, all work in, 
on, over or under the streets 
alleys, avenues and-or 
public places of the town, 
shall be done in a neat and 
workman like manner; and 
all surplus dirt, litter and 
trash created by such work 
shall immediately be clean- 
ed up, removed and dispos- 
ed of as directed by the 
town trustees. 

(c) The location of all poles, 
cross-arms, guy wires and 
other line equipment shall 
be such as not to interfere 
in any way with free ingress 
and egress over their usual 
and customary way or Ways 
to any private property; or 
interfere with the public 
traffic or pedestrians in the 
free and unhampered use of 
all streets, alleys, avenues 
and-or public places any 
ways of the town. 




(c) The owner and operator of 
this franchies may, when 
necessary, trim any tree 
overhanging the public 
. streets, alleys and ways of 
the town; but such work 
shall be done in a reason- 
able and prudent manner, 
and with the least damage 
possible thereto. 
(d*> The franchise hereby offer- 
ed for sale is not to be ex- 
clusive; and the town of 
Walton may at any time 
during the life of this fran- 
chise, offer and sell another 
franchise for same purpose, 
(e) The purchaser of this fran- 
chise, his successors and 
assigns, shall provide con- 
tinuous twenty-four per day 
standard electric service to 
all consumers of electric 
current hereunder, unless 
otherwise agreed, or pre- 
vented by an act of God or 
other unavoidable tempoary 
interruption, 
(e) And shall give the town of 
Walton ample security that 
all of the terms and con- 
ditions of this franchise will 
be faithfully performed by 
him, his successors and as- 
signs. And will keep and 
maintain a general office in 
the town of Walton, Ken- 
tucky, which shall be open 
at all reasonable hours 
(except on Sunday) for the 
transaction of all business 
between such owners of this 
franchise and its patrons. 
Section 3— That, in the con- 
struction and maintainance of the 
Electric Distributing System pro- 
vide for herein, should the pur- 
chaser of this franchise, his or its 
successors and assigns, elect to use 
underground Conduits for install- 
ing any part of its electric wires or 
other equipment, the same shall 
be done without damage or injury 
to any of the pipes; meters or 
other equipment of the town 
Water System or private property; 
and the location and installment 
of same shall be controled by the 
town trustees. 

Section 4. — That, by the pur- 
chase of this franchise, the pur- 
chaser, his or its, successors and 
assigns, bind and obligate them- 
selves to promptly pay to the 
town of Walton, Kentucky, all 
damages" to any street, alley, ave- 
nue or other public place or way 
of the town, or any other property 
of the town, arising or growing 
out of any act or omission done or 
omitted by such purchaser, his or 
its, agents, servants or employes 
in the construction, maintainance 
or operation of the electric dis- 
tributing system herein provided 
for; and, upon notice from the 
town so to do, shall answer and 
defend all actions for personal 
injury or damage to property that 
may be brought against the town 
of Walton, Kentucky, for damages 
suffered by reason of any neg- 
ligence of such purchaser, his or 
its, servants, agents or employes 
in the construction, maintainance 
or operation of the electric dis- 
tributing system herein authoriz- 
ed; and to promptly pay all judge- 
ments for such damages that may 
be rendered by any court against 
the town of Walton, Kentucky; 
for such damages; and to, in every 
way, indemnify and save said 
town harmless from any loss or 
damage by reason of any negli- 
gence of the owner of this fran- 
chise, his or its, agents, servants 
or employes in the construction, 
maintainance or operation of the 
electric distributing system pro- 
vided for in this franchise. . 




This sticktr m yom 
window shows you 
bought extra W ur 
Bonds. Display it 
Proudly! 



Loan, and more if possible. 
Whatever sacrifice it may 
involve, it's nothing com- 
pared to those being made 
every day by the men at grips 
with the enemy. Help them 
finish the job— bring them 
home sooner — by buying 
extra War Bonds now! 



te&A& BACK THE ATTACK! 

The Advertisement Sponsored by 

COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 



INCORPORATED 



»V Is For 
Vision 

Everybody has a part in the 
drive for VICTORY. Good eye- 
sight is of vital Importance. Bye 
strain and defective vision keeps 
a person below normal, when It 
Is his or her patriotic duty to feel 
as well and strong as possible. 

Come In today and have your 
eyes examined. 

FRANK RIGGS 

Optometrist 
Pttte A Russell Covington, Ky. 



Bates 

Section 5— The rates to be 
charged for electric current by. the 
purchaser of this franchise, his or 
its successors and assigns, until, 
and unless changed by order of 
the Public Service Commission of 
Kentucky, shall be as follows; 

. Residential Lighting 

Bates s 

First 12 KWH for $L00 

Next 38 KWH at .06c 

Next 60 KWH at .04c 

Next 75 KWH at .03c 

Additional KWH at .02ttc 

Minimum Billing $1. per month 

Commercial Light 
Bates 

First 12 SWA for $1.00 

Next 138 KWH at .06c 

Next 300 KWA at .04c 

Additional KWH at .03c 

Minimum Billing $1. per month 

5% added if not paid on or before 
10th day of month" 

Section 6 — That, Rules 13 - 14 - 
15 - 16 - 17 - 18 - 19 - 20 »: 21 - 




Votir 

Better have your eyes examined 
— they may be the cause of 
your feeling tired and irritable. 

Jos. B. Schnippering 

Optometrist and Optician 
(Formerly with F. Ptopcr) 



5 Pike Street, Covtngtea 
Phone HElock ' 




I L HAMILTON & SON 

FUNERAL SERVICE 

VERONA -|. KENTUCKY 




22 - 23 - 24 - 25 - 26 - 27 - 28 and 
29 and all existing amendments 
thereto promulgated and estab- 
lished by the Public Service Com- 
mission of Kentucky, are hereby 
made a part of this franchise as 
If copied in full herein, and the 
purchaser of this franchies, his or 
its successors and assigns, shall 
be governed thereby as to all rates 
and service charged or rendered 
by them. 

Section 7— That, the purchaser 
of this franchise shall, before the 
sale thereof is awarded to him or 
it, pay to the town Of Walton,, 
Kentucky, in addition to the I 
amount bid for the franchise, all j 



costs and expenses incurred by 
the town in the preparation, pub- 
lication and sale of this franchise. 
This ordinance shall be in full 
force and effect after its passage 
and publication as required by 
law. * 

Passed by the vote of 4 members 
of the Board of Trustees of the 
town of Walton, January 28, 1944. 

J. R. CONRAD. 
Chairman of the Board of trustees 
of the town of Walton, Kentucky- 
Attest: 

R. C. BRAKEFIELD, Town Clerk, 
Pro. Tem. 



COLONIAL 

COAL & SUPPLY COMPANY 

„ 47 OKIE HIGHWAY ERLANGER, KY. 

call DIXIE 7720 for* 

Wayne Feeds ^ — — Red Jacket Coal 

Concrete Blocks '— Ready Mixed Concrete 



PUBLIC SALE 

Having decided to quit farming, I will sell to the 
high bidder at my farm, on the Harris Pike, near 
the 3 L Highway, one mile South of Independence, 

SAT., FEB. 5th 

AT 1:30 P. M. 

LIVESTOCK 
16 eWes, will lamb in February; 1 buck; 2 heifers, 
fresh in April; 2 milk cows, one to be fresh in April 
and one in September; 5 shoats; 2 gilts and 36 
Plymouth Rock hens. 

TOOLS 
Hay fork; rope; 1 -horse cultivator; pitch fork; 
wheel borrow; sheep feed rack; extension ladder; 
cross cut saw and numerous small items. 

MISCELLANEOUS 
Incubator; iron kettle; milk can; milk cooler; oil 
stove; cook stove; heatrola; stanchions; bed stead; 
feather bed; goose feather pillows and davenport 
set. 

TERMS CASH 

MRS. LULU LOOMIS 

OWNER 
W. H. SUMMEY, Auctioneer 



GOODE'S 

TOBACCO SEED 

Worthington's Ky. Experiment Station Certified 
No.4 1-A and No. 16 White Burley. 
Root-Rot Resistant 



Chancellor & Duncan's Ky. Experiment Station, 
New Improved Big White Burley No. 16. 
' Root-Rot Resistant 

Casey's Crossed Tobacco Seed, Type No. 1 and 
Twist Bud. 

Guaranteed To Grow 



Warner's Golden Burley, Improved White Burley, 
Re-cleaned and tested at Ky. Expe riment Station. 

Judy's Pride — The Old Reliable. 



Price of All Seed: 



One -half Oz., 75c - One Oz., $1.50 

GEO. C. G00DE 

23 Pike St. 22 W. Seventh St. Covington, Ky. 



&msmMmg%msgM 









WALTON ADVERTISER 



Thursday, February 3, 1944 



WEEKLY NEWS ANALYSIS 



Fifth Army Patrols Move Into Cassino 
As Nazis Begin Withdrawal Movement; 
Russian Troops Press Drive to Baltic; 
Winter Drouth Broken in Midwest Area 



(EDITOR'S NOTE: When opinions are expressed In these columns, they are those of 
Western Newspaper Union's news analysts and not necessarily ot this newspaper.) 

aMHvaMMM Released by Western Newspaper Union. : 





FREEING LENINGRAD Map .hows direction of Russian drives 

to relieve long-besieged city of Leningrad. (See: Russia.) 




Wilson 




Kesselring 



ITALY: 

Nazis Trapped 

Taking one daring jump up the 
long Italian peninsula, Allied troops 
under command of 
Mediterranean Chief 
Sir Henry Maitland 
Wilson landed far to 
the rear of 100,000 
Nazi troops fighting 
off steady V. S. and 
■British advances in 
the mountainous 
Cassino area. 

Swarming ashore 
along 30 miles of 
sandy beach a short 
distance below 
Rome, the Allies seemingly caught 
the Germans oft bal- 
ance, with no oppo- 
sition encountered. 
As supplies were be- 
ing rushed to the 
invading army, the 
Nazis launched a 
series of fierce 
counterattacks near 
Cassino to cover 
their withdrawal 
from the town short- 
ly after. 
The German Field 
Marshal Albert Kesselring found 
himself in a pretty pickle, with a 
big Allied army at his rear threaten- 
ing the two supply roads leading 
down to Cassino. The Allies first 
began to encounter resistance at 
their invasion point when they poked 
12 miles inland, with one of the two 
supply roads already under their 
fire. 

LEND-LEASE: 
Food Shipments 

' Ten and one-half billion pounds of 
iood and farm products were sent 
'abroad on lend-lease during the first 
11 months of 1943, with November 
shipments alone aggregating 1,000,- 
000,000 pounds, of which Great Brit- 
ain got 60 per cent and Russia 38 
per cent. 

During the 11-month period, lend- 
lease took 15 out of every 100 pounds 
of pork produced in the U. S. ; 11% 
pounds out of every 100 pounds of 
lamb and mutton; 1 out of every 100 
pounds of beef and veal; 4 out of 
every 100 quarts of milk; 13 out of 
eVery 100 pounds of cheese, and 3% 
out of every 100 pounds of butter. 

Of the 10,500,000,000 pounds sent 
abroad during the 11-month period, 
sugar alone accounted for more than 
3,000.000,000 pounds. 

RUSSIA: 

Press Baltic Drive 

Nazi troops fell back to the south 
of Leningrad as the Russians 
pressed their big offensive aimed at 
. driving through to the Baltic sea. 

As tlje Reds moved forward be- 
S hind the tremendous weight of tanks 
and artillery, they cut all of the 
east-west railroads over which the 
Nazis could remove troops from 
their front lines. In addition, they 
fought to clear the Germans from 
the Leningrad-Moscow railroad link- 
ing Russia's two great industrial 
cities;: i '■ ' 

-Fighting to stave off capture of the 
Warsaw-Odessa railroad supplying 
their Ukrainian troops, the Germans 
launched counterattacks on the 
southern front, slowly pressing back 
the Reds about 80 miles from the 
Rumanian border. After stabbing 
iieep into prewar Poland, on either 
side of the vast wastes of the Pripet 
marshes, the Russian drive tapered 
off in the face of strong resistance. 



ARMY SAVINGS: 

27 Billion Returned 

Of 71 billion dollars appropriated 
for its use during the present fiscal 
year, the war department will re- 
turn 27 billion dollars to the treas- 
ury. 

Reductions in requirements of cer- 
tain arms like tanks, antiaircraft 
guns and heavy artillery, and slash- 
ing of costs of materials'because of 
mass production, has enabled, the 
war department to effect consider- 
able savings in armament expendi- 
tures. 

In explaining the army's original 
request for 71 billion dollars, a 
war department official declared 
that plans had been made for maxi- 
mum needs to cover all possible 
emergencies, and as in the case of 
shipping, for instance, losses proved 
far below expectations. 

WINTER DROUTH: 

« 

Broken in Midwest 

Light, spotty rainfall was expected 
to turn into heavy downpours 
throughout the Middle West, thus 
breaking the winter-long drouth per- 
iling late grown grains, hay and pas- 
ture. 

In the Mississippi valley, precipi- 
tation reached as much as a quar- 
ter-inch, with predictions that rain 
would turn into snow. While rainfall 
was forecast for northern and west- 
ern Missouri and eastern Kansas, it 
was said only the extreme southeast- 
ern part of Nebraska could expect 
showers. 

The rainfall terminated almost 
two months of the sunniest weather 
the Midwest has enjoyed in years, 
with January the brightest since 1924 
and December since 1870. Compared 
with normally- shining 45 per cent 
of the time in January, this year 
the sun shone 56 per* cent, and in 
December instead of shining the 
usual 40 per cent of the time, it 
shone 59 per cent. 

LIQUOR TAX: 

1 % Billion Collected 

Despite hard liquor shortages and 
wartime problems in production and 
distribution, the liquor industry paid 
IVi billion dollars in taxes to the 
government in 1943, 19 per cent 
above 1942. 

Although all whisky and gin manu- 
facture was stepped and distilled 
spirits withdrawals were below 1942, 
an increase in the tax from $4 to 
$6 per proof gallon boosted receipts 
to 900 million dollars. 

The tax on beer was not raised 
as much as the levy on distilled 
spirits, but expanded sales of the 
beverage accounted for the payment 
of one-half billion dollars in taxes, 
100 mjllion- dollars over 1942. 

BOLIVIA: 
Snubbed by U. S. 

Charging that the Bolivian revolu- 
tionary government's seizure of pow- 
er last December 20 was closely 
linked with Axis conspiracy in South 
America, the U. S. withheld its rec- 
ognition of the new regime, but did 



not immediately resort to applying 
an economic squeeze against the 
country. 

Source of 50 per cent of U. S. 
tin supplies and also the source of 
rubber, tungsten and quinine, Bo- 
livia was the recipient of lend-lease, 
since cancelled, and, with the U. S., 
put up capital for the Bolivian De- 
velopment corporation, which was 
designed to exploit the country's 
rich natural resources. 



• HIGHLIGHTS • • • >» -the week's netvt 



JET PLANE: The new "jet plane" 
Is easier to operate than a primary 
trainer, according to a veteran test 
pilot who has made many flights in 
experimental models. He said that 
the chief advantages of the jet pro- 
pulsion engine are the great power 
compared to size and weight and its 
adaptability to a wide range of 
fuels, including alcohol and cheap- 
sir petroleum products. 



BLAST: Explosion of a steam tur- 
bine in a huge steel plant in South 
Chicago, Ind., killed five men and 
injured 11 others. The huge ma- 
chine, which would generate 8,000 
kilowatts, was being tested before 
being put into service. A section of 
wall was blown out, fragments of 
steel flew around like shrapnel and 
the roar was heard over a wide 
area. 



Washington, D. O. 

ARMY DOCTORS 

It was lost in the news shuffle, but 
Dr. John H. Musser of the Tulane 
university medical school, a mem- 
ber of a special committee named 
by Secretary of War Henry Stim- 
son to study medical conditions in 
the army, made some startling ad- 
missions recently at a senate com- 
mittee hearing on the utilization of 
doctors by the war department. 

Testifying before the Pepper sub- 
committee on wartime health and' 
education at a hearing in Pasca- 
goula, Miss,, Musser was asked if 
the army had too many doctors. 

"Yes," he replied. "There has 
been too much indiscriminate re- 
cruiting of medical men without due 
regard for civilian needs." 

"Do you think that the army has 
utilized its doctors properly?" he 
was asked. .. 

"Definitely no,", replied the Tu- 
lane professor. "The present sys- 
tem of medical service in the army 
is based, on a nww«vj"« a that dates 
jbafcjsffsr the ouanish-American war 
and calls for the recruiting of a 
disproportionate number of physi- 
cians from civilian life." 

To illustrate his point. Doctor 
Musser pointed out that Tulane uni- 
versity's unit of doctors in the army 
medical corps had spent more than 
a year "twiddling their thumbs" at 
Camp Benning, Georgia, while 
awaiting a call for overseas duty. 
At this time. Doctor Musser said, 
there was a crying need for doc- 
tors by civilians. 

Dr. Musser said he realized that 
the need for doctors was far greater 
than in the last war, but that the 
army medical corps wasn't making 
the fullest use of its personnel. 
. • — si a 

WILD ANIMALS' HOLIDAY 

Since the army has a priority on 
guns and shells, there hasn't been 
much hunting for two years, with 
the result that wild animals are 
creeping up on civilization. Both 
farmers and state officials are de- 
manding cartridges to drive off this 
invasion. 

War production board has re- 
ceived urgent messages from state 
officials in every part of the country. 
Pennsylvania is alarmed at the bold- 
ness of bears and deer. New York 
says rabbits eat Victory gardens. 
Louisiana needs shotguns to drive 
off the flocks of rice birds. 

This explosive situation was the 
last task handled by Maury Mav- 
erick before he left WPB's govern- 
ment division, to become WPB vice 
chairman in charge of the small 
plants division. 

He tried to raise the civilian car- 
tridge quota from 12 per cent of 
normal to 50 per cent. At first, the 
army was willing. But that was be- 
fore Cairo-Teheran. After the Big 
Three powwow the army hinted 
that it would need everything for 
the invasion, and declined to pass 
the ammunition. 

When the nev/s,, reached the back- 
woods, says Maverick, the deer did 
a dance, and bears celebrated with 
big bear hugs. 

O ' • o 

COSMOPOLITAN CONGRESS 

The farm bloc is all-powerful in 
the house of representatives, but 
you'd never guess it to judge by the 
number of members' who are real, 
active farmers. There are only 30. 

Lawyers, because of their natural 
bent for politics, continue to domi- 
nate the house membership by an 
overwhelming majority. Out of a 
total 435 members, 234 are lawyers. 
Business men rank next, with a del- 
egation of 60. 

There are 27 teachers and profes- 
sors, 23 writers and newspaper men, 
9 former government officials, 9 in- 
surance agents, 4 doctors, 2 engi- 
neers, 2 dentists, and 2 certified 
public accountants. 

Only one minister holds a con- 
gressional seat, Rep. Charles A. 
Eaton of New Jersey, former rector 
of the Madison Avenue Baptist 
church in New York city, although 
Rep. Walter H. Judd of Minnesota 
was a medical missionary in China 
for several years. 

The sports world is represented 
chiefly by Congressmen Joseph 
O'Brien- of New York, former pro- 
fessional wrestler and football play- 
er; Samuel Weiss of Pennsylvania, 
a football referee who still officiates 
in National Pro league games; and 
La Vern R. Dilweg of Wisconsin, for- 
mer All-America footballer at Mar- 
quette university. 

The rest of the membership hails 
from a miscellany of trades and pro- 
fessions, including a number of la- 
boring merf, miners and mill work- 
ers,- two druggists — Representatives 
Carl Durham of North Carolina and 
Harve Tibbott of Pennsylvania— and 
a veterinarian. Congressman George 
W. Gillie of Indiana. 

_: _ ■ . . . • . . .< 

CAPITAL CHAFF 

C D. B. Robertson, president of the 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Fire- 
men, privately denounces Bill 
Green's statement that the railroad 
strike would never have been pulled. 
Robertson says he and his men 
meant ever word of it 
<L Because of his interest in Com- 
munism, singer Paul Robeson has 
been prevented from making USO 
concert, tours of U. S. army camps. 
The state department even denies 
him a passport to go to England, 
where he is immensely popular. 




'A Season of Surprises' — 

And S till More to Come 

Government Control of Railroads and 

National Service Act Complete Surprise 

In Many Quarters. 




By BAUKHAGE 

New$ Analyst and Commentator. 



WNU Service, Union Trust Building, 
Washington, D. C. 

This is the season of surprises— I 
won't mention at this moment the 
big one which will cause your eye- 
brows to go up at an early date (if 
they haven't already). 

I'll mention two others— on the la- 
bor front — since they represent two 
of the neatest problems with which 
congress still has to deal and which 
are particularly full of dynamite be- 
cause of the coming elections. And 
elections are bound to color the acts 
of every public man from now until 
the ides of November. j j. 

We are used to it now because ii> 
happened some time age, and the 
effects were not visible to the naked 
eye — but one big surprise that shook 
Washington as the year ended was 
the sudden announcement on a 
balmy Monday evening in Decem- 
ber which ordered the army to take 
over the railroads. 

All over Washington" the day be- 
fore, that day too, as a matter of 
fact, you could have collected fine 
odds against such a thing happen- 
ing. Not that people were betting 
on that subject itself; what they 
were betting on, those who ought to 
have been (and I still believe were) 
in the know, was that there would 
be no railroad strike. 

The second big surprise is still 
having its. sharp repercussions al- 
though it happened not so much 
more recently than the other event 
to which it was closely linked. 

National Service Act 

The first, I discussed in a recent 
column in connection with the seiz- 
ure of the railroads. Then the sec- 
ond, the President's demand for a 
national service act as a part of his 
legislative program outlined in that 
annual message, came tumbling aft- 
er, and we haven't gotten over ei- 
ther yet. 

One astute and neutral observer 
of affairs in Washington— an old- 
timer, who sees parties come and 
go without loss of sleep over his 
job, said something to me after the 
roads had been seized that I have 
had occasion to ponder upon often 
since. 

He is one of the men who was 
ready to give odds that there would 
be no strike and he knows all of the 
people who participated in the con- 
ferences, employers, union heads, 
officials, by their first names — ex- 
cept the President, of course, whom 
nobody but his mother as far as I 
know, perhaps his wife 'When she is 
here, first names. One just doesn't 
first-name Presidents. 

Anyhow, this friend of mine, 
aghast at the suddenness of the seiz- 
ure of the roads, remarked: 

"Do you realize this? Overnight, 
Instead of being the object of all at- 
tacks for babying labor, the Presi- 
dent suddenly is in the position now 
of defending the people against la- 
bor?" 

That was the quick reaction of a 
technical man to whom politics is 
only an interesting sideline. 

When the President's message 
was droned out by the reading clerk 
in congress and the President came 
to point five in his five-point legisla- 
tive program, there was a sharp in- 
take of breaths. You recall the first 
reaction. Hardly anything but a 
frigid reception for the suggestion 
for what was immediately called 
"the labor draft." 

Cynics' Reactions 

Then came the cynical observa- 
tion of the anti-administration poli- 
ticians. It sounded a little like the 
comment of my first-quoted observ- 
er except that it was flavored more 
heavily with party tabasco. 

"Pure politics," they sneered. "He 
had no labor program. He knew it. 
So now he tosses the hottest con- 
troversial question on the boards — 
labor draft— into congress. He prob- 
ably hopes we won't pass it. If we 
don't, he'll say: 'See, I give them a 
labor program and they turn me 
downr~ 

Well, there are the two surprises 
which are scheduled to breed others 
in their trail, and you and every- 
body else will interpret them in 
terms of your or their prejudices, 
sharpened to a knife-edge of devo- 
tion or hatred in this year of the 
ballot 

What is really behind these two 
sharp and unexpected moves? It Is 



pretty hard to be really objective. 
Anyone who has watched political 
campaigns in the making, has a 
hard time not to attribute a partisan 
motive to any act or word spoken 
in Washington in an election year. 

As far as taking the railroads over 
goes, that might have been prompt- 
ed by a real and honest fear that 
transportation would have been in- 
terfered with at a moment when it 
was as vital to the war effort as a 
division of fighting men. What pos- 
sible excuse could there be for let- 
ting such a thing happen? 

Again, whether or not there was 

i be a strike, there was a strike 
threat. At the same moment, there 
was a strike threat in another vital 
industry — steel. That was called off 
by putting pressure on Phillip Mur- 
ray, head of the C. I. O. But could 
that pressure have been applied un- 
less Mr. Murray could have been 
told: "Rerhember, the chances of 
acceptance of your demands by the 
steel men will be a lot better if 
they are afraid the government will 
take their Industry over too. The 
railroads are a warning." 

And then, If you want to take one 
highly unofficial explanation from a 
nobody as far as officialdom goes, 
but from a man who has fought in 
his own little sphere for things he 
believes in, I'll throw it in for good 
measure. 

The comment was applied to the 
President's call for a national serv- 
ice act, not the seizure of the roads, 
but it applies to both. This observ- 
er observed: 

"Politics? No. The guy just wants 
to win the war." 

a And come to think of it, that might 
have had something to do with it 
too. , 

• • • 

Notes From a 
Broadcaster' s Diary 

The following two viewpoints re- 
ceived recently are interesting. Here 
is the first: 

"Neither slavery nor involuntary 
servitude except as punishment for 
crime whereof the party shall have 
been duly convicted shall exist with- 
in the United States or any place 
subject to their jurisdiction." — from 
the Constitution of the United States. 

The President swore to uphold the 
Constitution — the national service 
act or the labor draft is involuntary 
servitude or human slavery. That's 
what he called it in Berlin and Tokyo 
and he wants it here. What are we 
fighting for? 

And now for the second viewpoint! 

General Eisenhower said we can 
win the war in 1944 but everyone 
must do his part. - 

Something must be wrong some- 
where for him to say that He knows 
it is not the armed forces. So it 
must be on the home front For the 
armed forces operate on a function- 
al alignment — from commanding of- 
ficer down, orders are given and 
obeyed. Servicemen cannot bargain 
with their commanders as to wages, 
hours, fighting conditions or make 
contracts on a cost-plus basis. Their 
objective is to win battles. 

But on the home front, the objec- 
tive is to make money (see Truman 
Report). Ships, planes, tanks and 
guns are secondary. 

We can have a functional opera- 
tion at home by installing total con- 
scription of men, machines, materi- 
al and money. 

These boys were conscripted to 
die. Then why sat conscript the 
ones at home? If it's good enough 
for the armed forces, it's good 
enough for the rest of us. 

Who can say he is entitled to 
more? 



Jottings 



From May through September, 
1943, various government agencies 
placed 2,706,000 volunteer farm la- 
borers to help harvest the nation's 
crops. 

• • • 

During 1943 Massachusetts home- 
makers . canned fruits and vegeta- 
bles which were worth an estimated 
900,000,000 ration points. 

• • • 

Every ton ot scrap iron and steel 
used in our blast furnaces saves two 
tons of our reserve of high-grade 
iron ore. 



BRIEFS 



by Baukhage 



Through a series of phrase books 
supplemented by phonograph rec- 
ords, American troops are learning 
to speak the essentials of as many 
as 30 different languages. 
• • • 

Peasants of Nazi-occupied France 
have been asked in a broadcast from 
Radio France at Algiers to save 
city children from famine by adopt- 
ing them. 



The armed forces of the United 
States recently- received approxi- 
mately 53,000,000 pounds of coffee 
from Brazil This gift, freshly roast- 
ed, now is going to the American 
soldiers stationed in all parts of the 
world. 

. • • • 

Mexico Is expected to supply 75,- 
000 workers to the United States in 
1944. 



ON THE 

HOMEFRON 



RUTH WYET 




E>§) 




AUTHENTIC 
■AALY ►*• 
AMERICAN 
HOBBY HORSE 
HEAD 

"ay 

CUT 
FROM A v 
I' BOARD - 



USE 

ACTUAL SIZE 
PATTERN TO CUT 
AND STENCIL 
ALSO AS A 
GUIDE FOR 
ASSEMBLING 



MAKE A 
BROOMSTICK 
HORSE OR A 
TODDLE 
BIKE 




HpHIS horse head is a copy of an 
■*■ Early American hobbyhorse. It 
is full of dash and spirit yet it is 
so simple that the original crafts- 
man probably cut it out with an 
ordinary handsaw and a pocket 
knife. 

A toddle bike is more up-to-date 
than a hobbyhorse because we 
know now that it is better for tiny 
tots to learn to use their legs than 
to get a sense of motion by rock-* 
ing. The bike is easy to make of 
scraps of lumber; or when you 
have cut out the head and sten- 
ciled it you may decide to mount 
it on a broomstick as shown at the 
upper left. 



\ ASK Aft? 

? 
? 



ANOTHER t I 

A General Quiz ? 



The Question* 

1. When was the American Red 
Cross originated? , 

2. What new cargo is being de- 
livered abroad by our oil tankers? 

3. Who was the first man to hold 
the post of seoretary of agricul- 
ture in a President's cabinet? 

4. Who is usually recognized as 
the builder of the first American 
automobile that ran? 

5. How long has the castle been 
the insigne of the United States 
engineers? 

6. Which was the first planet dis- 
covered in historical times? 

7. How much time elapsed after 
the end of the last war before com- 
plete demobilization of the 4,000,- 
000 men under arms took place? 

8. What is the largest lake in 
Europe? 



The Answer* 

1. In 1866. 

2. Special devices now permit 
tankers to carry as deck cargo al- 
most all types of fighter planes 
and torpedo boats requiring ship- 
ment by sea. 

3. Norman J. Colman under 
Cleveland. 

4. Charles E. Duryea. 

5. Since 1840. 

6. Uranus (in 1781). 

7. One and a half years. 

8. Lake Ladoga (in Finland and 
Russia). 



Mechanical Christener 



One of the shipbuilding firms on 
the eastern seaboard now uses a 
bottle-swinging machine — which 
has been nicknamed "Christine" — 
in the christening of its smaller 
vessels. 



NOTE — Mrs. Spears has prepared aa 
actual size pattern (No. 2S7) for this au- 
thentic Early American hobbyhorse head 
and also all the parts of the toddle bike. 
The pattern Includes stencil designs for 
painting, a color guide, and complete di- 
rections. Pattern Is 15 cents postpaid. Ad* 
dress : 



MRS. RUTH WYETH SPEARS 

Bedford Hills . New York 

Drawer 10 

Enclose 15 cents for Pattern No. 
257. 
Name 



Address 



"NO MORE TROUBLE 
WITH CONSTIPATION!" 

Says Long-Time Sufferer 
Who Tried Laxative Cereal! 



If you, too, are disappointed 
with pills and purgatives, be sure 
to read this unsolicited letter I 

"For several years I was afflicted with 
common constipation. 1 tried various 
remedies, but sot only temporary relist. 
Several months ago, 1 started eating 
KELLOGG'S ALL-BRAN each morning, 
drinking water freely through the day. I 
have since never had the slightest trouble 
with constipation. My gratitude ta KEL- 
LOGG'S ALL-BRAN." Mr. H. M. Biley, 
11 E. Division Street. Chicago. 111. 

Scientists say KELLOGG'S 
w L-BRAN can really "get at" a 
common cause of constipation- 
lack of sufficient "cellulosic" ele- 
ments in the diet — because it is 
one of Nature's most effective 
sources of these elementsi They 
work by helping the friendly 
colonic flora fluff up and prepare 
the colonic wastes for easy, nat- 
ural elimination. KELLOGG'S 
ALL-BRAN is not a purgative. 
Doesn't "sweep you out"! Ifs a 
gentle-acting, "regulating^ food. 
If you have constipation of this 
type, eat KELLOGG'S ALL- 
BRAN or several ALL-BRAN 
muffins regularly. Drink plenty of 
water. See if you, too, don't cheer 
its welcome relief I Insist on gen- 
uine ALL-BRAN, made only by 
Kellogg's in Battle Creek. 



TABASCO 

The snappiest seasoning known, and 
the world's most widely distributed 
food product! A dash of this piquant 
sauce gives a rare flavor to any food. 
TABASCO— the seasoning secret of 
master chefs for more than^S years I 



Five-Footed Dog 

A dog with a double leg, giving 
it five feet, is owned by John 
Smith, of St. Louis, Mo. It runs 
and plays with ease. 




Bee's Appetite 
It takes a bee. a month to est 
its weight in food. 



NOSE MUST DRAIN 

To Relieve H»ad Cold Mij.rie« 
When head colds strike, help nose ' 
drrrin.riear the way for freer breathing ' 
comfort with CONDON'S NASAL JELLY. At drmttUm 




* 



IN THE NAVY AIR CORPS 

they say: 

*DUCK" *« •» ampWbian plane 

« CAMEL" for the favorite cigarette wi 

in the Navy S «V|CE 

(Based on sctual saws 






FOG 
**£S« 
fLAVO* 

AMO EXTRA 

CAMELS 

Me! 



. . -y* v - ' 



^ws>~*. 



1 














B 










GM& 



/~ 



■ 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



COMMISSIONER'S SALE 



Commonwealth of Kentucky, 
Boone Circuit Court, 
C. C. Hopperton, et al., Plaintiff 
Venus:- Notice of Sale 

Callie Hopperton Beach et al., 
Defendant. 

By virtue of a Judgement and 
order of sale of the Boone Circuit 
Court rendered at the December 



Term thereof 1943, in the above 
cause, I shall proceed to offer for 
sale on the premises in Walton, 
Kentucky to the highest bidder, at 
public auction on Monday, the 7th 
day of February 1944 at 1:00 
O'clock P. M. (Central War Time) 
or thereabout (being the 1st day 
of the February Term of County 
Court), upon a credit of 6 and 12 
months, the following described 
property to- wit: 



fffi/V** - i/lf*— ..«^/ V^ > ..»4f»mk mt i 



A Savings 

A«ount m«ans 

security and 

Safety (or 

th« -futur*. 

Build YOUR 

amount now. 



Working 
steadily? 

Then save 
regularly 

for you'll 

need money 

after the war. 



$ 



i 

a 

;. 

I 



FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION" 
OF COVINGTON 





r Ml MAIN 8TREKT (OflUe Open Dally) mmamt^^ 1MB 

B M* J *"<— J aW — < JtV » »< V t»»— *Vfr>» a aa JFj w m*&m M< ^tP 



PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 

Deposits Insured Under the Federal 
Deposit lusurance Corporation . . . 



Parcel No. 1 A house and lot in 
Walton, Boone County, Kentucky, 
situated on the west side of the 
Covington St, Lexington Turnpike 
road and bounded and described 
as follows: Beginning at a stake 
132 feet from a gate post which 
is on the line between William 
Gillman's Line and Arnold's pro- 
perty running on a line with the 
edge of the Lexington and Cov- 
ington Turnpike s 29'. E 66 feet 
to a stake, corner with W. H. 
Stamler's lot; thence with Stam- 
ler's line S 60% W 229 feet pass- 
ing a 25 foot street at 160 x 185 
respectively to a stake 33 feet 
from the center of the L & N 
Railway; thence North 3% W 72 
feet to a stake; thence North 60% 
E 399 feet passing a 25 foot street 
at 214 and 239 feet respectively 
to the beginning. Being the same 
property conveyed to Margaret 
(Maggie) Hopperton by Mattle V 
Doubman, by deed dated August 
12, 1915, recorded in Deed Book 57 
page 60 of the Boone County Re 
cords, at Burlington, Ky. 

Parcel No. 2 A certain tract or 
parcel of land, lying and being in 
Boone County Kentucky, west of 
and adjoining the twon of Walton, 
and bounded thus; Beginning at 
a: .—. in a line of S»»v right of 
way of the L &, N Railroad, a cor- 
ner with Eli Conrad, thence with 
his line S. 61 W 12.80 chains to a 
corner with Harvey Roberts; 
thence with his line N 12% W. 
21.65 chains to a stone; thence 
with a line of a paasway N. 77% 
E 30 links to a stone; thence N. 
9% W. 1089 chains to a corner 
with 26 acre lot set apart to 
Annie Glenn; thence with a line 
of said lot N 75% E 23.54 chains 
to a stone in a line of the afore- 
said railroad; thence with , the 
line of the right of way of said 
railroad S 3 19-26 . . . 5.59 chains; 
S 1 E 2.57 chains, S 2 W 3.39 
chains, S 10 W 4.47 .chains, S 14% 



When In Covington 



stftf* 




at 

LANG'S CAFETERIA 

623-625 Madison Aye. 
Covington 



Mir COULD AFFORD A UTTIE EXTRA 



...CANY YOU? 




Tho Fourth War Loan starts today. 

Your Government wants you to sup- 
port this loan by buying at least one 
extra $100 Bond. 

You may not find it easy to spare an 
extra $100. But— 



If the men in our armed forces can 
afford to give their limbs and lives- 
then certainly you can afford to lend 
at least $100 ... or $200 ... or $300 . . . 
or even $500. 

Be a good American — buy extrm 
Bonds RIGHT NOW! 



^<af BACK THE ATTACK! 




-Sponsored By 



Consolidated Telephone Co. 



FLORENCE 



KENTUCKY 



W 4.24 chains, S 18 W 3.28 chains, 
S 21% W 3.59 chains, & 23 tt W 
2.03 chains to the beginning, con- 
taining 62.16 acres, more or less. 
Also a strip of land 60 feet wide 
on the west side of the L & N Ry. 
Co., right of way, running with 
said right of way to a street and 
being the rear portion of a lot 
conveyed by the grantor, Robert 
Brown, to Lula Jones, which was 
reserved by said Brown as an 
Outlet. Being the same property 
conveyed to Maggie Hopperton by 
Julia E. West, by deed dated Jan- 
uary 1st, 1916, and recorded In 
Deed Book 57, page 317 of the 
aforesaid records. 

For the purchase price, the 
purchaser must execute bond, 
with approved surety, bearing 
legal interest from the day of 
sale, until paid, and having the 
force and effect of a judgement. 
Bidders will be prepared to comply 
promptly with these terms. 
A. D. TELTON, 
Master Commissioner Boone 
*' Circuit Court 



WAR BONDS 



Services 



CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Walton, Ky. 



Geo. S. Caroland, Minister 
Church School... 10:00 a\ v m: 

Helen Ruth Gardiner, Supt. 
Worship, Lord's Supper 11:00 a. m. 
Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 



On Sunday morning as you sit in 
church and' see the vacant places 
in the -enoir and wonder where the 
war has taken the young people 
from your community you may feel 
certain that they are attending di- 
vine services if circumstance per- 
mits. 




GOSHEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Piner, Kentucky 



Cecil F. MoKee, Pastor 

Services 2nd and 4th Sundays. 
10:00 A. M. Sunday School. 
11:00 A. M. Church Service. 
6:00 P. M. Christian Youth 
Fellowship. 

7:30 P. M. Evening Service. 

INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST 
CHURCH 



W. E. Matters, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 7:00 p. m. 

Evangelist Services .... 8:00 P. m. 
Prayer and Bible Study, 

Wednesday 8:00 p. m 

WALTON METHODIST CHURCH 
Walton, Kentucky 



Rev. C. G. Bearing, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m 

Youth Fellowsihp 6:30 p. m, 

Evening Service 7:00 p. m, 



Chaplains and choral leaders are 
found on the larger ships and even 
abroad in the Army centers. 4 

, Millions of hymrrallj£ ~ - 
tributed to the men and women of 
all services and you may rest as- 
sured that a portion of the savings 
you are placing into War Bonds is 
used for their spiritual welfare. 

V. S. Treasury Dtptrlmini 



GLENCOE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. W. T. Dunaway, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m., Al- 
bert Collins, Supt. 

Morning worship at 11 a. m. 

Evening worship at 7:15 p. m. 

Prayer meeting on Thursday 
at 7:30 p. m. 



,WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Walton, Ky. 



Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed., 7:30 p. m. 



INDEPENDENCE CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 



Lee Doty, Minister 

Sunday School— 10:00 a. m. 

Worship and Communion— 
11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship — 8:00 p. m. 

You are cordially invited to 
attend any and all services. 



RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 



M. A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 
Sunday School, 10:00 a. m. 
Morning Worship, 11:00 a. m. 
Evening Worship, 7:00 p. m. 
Services every first and third 
Sundays. 



m FIRST 
•OK 



466 TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DROPS 




Your Valentine Photo 

Keep your image close to him 
in the lonely hours on a far- 
away front — send your smiling 
Valentine Photograph, made in 
our modern studio. Come in 
today. 

SERVICE PHOTO 
STUDIO 

804 Madison Ave., Covington 

STUDIO HOURS: 

11 A. M. to 9 P. M. Dally 

Sundays, 1 to 5 P. M. 



mm 

Walton Perpetual Bldg. & Loan Assn. 

DIXIE STATE BANK BLDG. WALTON, KY. 

E. 8. West, See 1 ? A. M. Edwards. Pre*. 

■ SEMI-ANNUAL DrVTDENDS 





WOOD SHEET METAL HEATING STOVES 

Coal Heaters, Oakes and Warm Morning 
Stove Pipe and Elbows 



39 Inches High, 12-Inch Stay Field Fence 
4-Point Cattle Barb Wire 



John Deere Farm Machinery and DeLaval 
Milken and Cream Separators. 

The. Jansen Hdw. Co. 



Co. 0910 



108-110 Pike Street 



Covington, Ky . 



UNION PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH > 

M. A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 

Sunday School, 11:00 a. m., E 
W. T. 

Morning Worship, 12:00 N, E. 
W. T. 

Evening Service, 8:30 p. m., 
E. W. T. 

Services every second and forth 
Sundays. 



NEW. BETHEL BAP. CHURCH 
Verona, Kentucky 

Rev. Shirley Spahr, Pastor 

Preaching services every 1st and 
3rd Sunday. 

Sunday School ~ 10. a. m. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed :, 8 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:80 p. m. 

All times given Central War Time 



Courtesy and Co-operation 



Has enabled vm to 
MbOe 



DIXIE STATE BANK 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 

Member ef Federal Deposit 



A fFNNy ROf T CARD WILL 
SAVE YOU DOLLARS ON 



FIELD and 



DIXIE BRAND 

SEEDS 



NEW CROP NOW ON SALE 



Begin now planning for the biggest farm 
year In history with tried and proven 
Hill's Dixie Brand Seeds— high in ger- 
mination and purity — best all-around 
results assured. 



PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL 



GEORGE W. 



Since 1963 

ILL 



AMD 



COMPANY 



SEEDSMEN SINCE 1863 



24-26 W. 
SEVENTH ST. 



25-29 PIKE 
STREET 



COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



PUBLIC AUCTION 

In order to settle the Estate of the late Albert 
Shields, I will sell at Public Auction at the Albert 
Shields farm, 4 miles South-West of Union on the 
Big Bone Church Road, on 

SAT., FEB. 5th 

10:00 A. M. * 

8 Milk Cows, date of freshen, 1st Feb., 1st March, 
3rd May, 1st June and 1st of Sept^i-lyearling 
heifer; 1 team work horses, work anywhere; 1 
work mule, work anywhere; 2 road wagons; 1 disc 
harrow; 1 Vulcan breaking plow; 1 Oliver break- 
ing plow; 1 two horse sled; 1 hay rake; 1 three 
shovel plow, good as new; 1 single shovel plow; 
1 two horse tobacco setter, 1 scalding box; 4 set 
work harness; collars; bridles; check lines; 1 vice; 
chains; hose and forks; post digger; shovel; small 
tools; 1 ten gallon milk can; 1 can washer; 1 cream 
seperator; and some household goods. 

TERMS— CASH 
Lunch Will Be Served On The Grounds 

BECKHAM SHIELDS, Adm. 

COL LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



■ 

I 



— 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 194* 



INDEPENDENCE R. R. 1 



Many people in this community 
are digging , ponds, the water 
situation is getting to be serious, 
we would appreciate a good rain. 

Mrs. L. N. Hoffman is able to 
be up in her room after several 
weeKs illness. 

Mr. Shaler Marshall is doing 
nicely from a tonsil operation at 
Christ Hospital one day the past 
week. 

Several from this community 
attended the funeral of Mrs. Julia 
Culberson of Newport Monday. 
She was well know in this com- 
munity. 

Mrs. Jim Crouch and sons re- 
turned home Sunday from several 



days visit with relatives at Sparta, 
Ky. 

Mr. Bob Farrel spent a few days 
furlough with his. parents this 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. -Hershel Sowder 
and little son of Latonia spent the 
day Sunday with hertparerits, Mr. 
and Mrs. Dawson Losey and 
family and attended church ser- 
vices at Staffordsburg. 

Mrs. Delia Williams returned 
home Friday evening from the 
Farm and Home Convention at 
Lexington and reported the week 
well spent. Mrs. Williams went as 
a delegate from the Staffordsburg 
Homemakers Club. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Miller are 

rejoicing over the arrival of a 

I little daughter, born Friday at 



SALE OF FRANCHISE 

"A Franchise for constructing, maintaining and 
operating an Electric Light, Heat and Power Plant 
in the town % 5 Walton, Kentucky, for a period of 
Twenty (20) years; with the right reserved to the 
town to reject any or all bids." 

Sealed bids will be received by the Clerk of the 
Town of Walton until 12 o'clock noon on the 11th 
day of February 1944, for the purchase of a fran- 
chise ordered to be sold by the Board of Trustees 
of the Town of Walton, to construct, maintain and 
operate an electric distribution system in the town 
of Walton for a period of twenty (20) years. 
The terms' of said franchise are set out in an ordin- 
ance of the Board of Trustees of the Town of Wal- 
ton, passed and approved on the 28th day of Jan- 
uary, 1944, to which reference may be made for 
inspection by the proposed bidders. 

All bids must be sealed and marked on the outside 
of the envelopes, "A Franchise for constructing, 
maintaining and operating an Electric Light, Heat 
and Power Plant in the town of Walton, Kentucky, 
for a period of Twenty (20) years; with the right 
reserved to the town to reject any or all bids." 

D. H. VEST, 

- Clerk Town of Walton 



Booths Hospital. Both mother and 
daughter are doing nicely. 

Rev. Cardwell fulfilled his re- 
gular appointment at Staffords- 
burg Sunday morning and even- 
ing. We had a good attendance at 
Sunday School and a good offer- 
ing for the Orphans Home, at- 
tendance 41 and offering $17.38. 
All come back next Sunday and 
try to bring someone with you. 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



LOST — A ring of keys, between 
Walton and Dry Ridge. Finder 
please leave keys at^ Advertiser 
Office. 



RADIO REPAIRS at reasonable 
rates, colonial 1121. 509 Seott 
Street. tf-lt 



NOTICE— Pure Drinking Water 
Hauled anywhere — anytime 
Call Walton 423. Jas. E. Falls. 
tf-47 



FOR SALE — 2 good work horses, 
cheap. Robert Chambers, Wal- 
ton, Ky. 2t-10 



FOR SALE — Good paying paper 
route in Walton, Ky. See 
Richard Collins, Walton, Ky. 
lt-11*— tf 

I FOR SALE — 40 head sheep, just. 

] beginning to lamb, and one red 

i boar, weight 300 lbs. Tilden 

Perry, Morning View, Ky., lt-1* 

FOR SALE — Five room house 

j with one acre of land. Phone 

Walton 46., R. E. Brugh. ltll 



FOR SALE — 19 good ewes, 1 ram, 
lambing now; 2 coming yearling 
colts; 1 set farm and stock 
scales, will weigh 12,000 lbs. 
Claude • Adams, Walton -Nichol- 
son Highway, Phone Ind. 6115. 
2t-ll* 



FOR SALE — Two fresh cows, one 
Jersey six yrs. old with calf by 
side and one Red cow 4 yrs. old 
with calf by side. M. J. Worth- 
ington, Bracht and Piner Road. 
2t-ll* 



FOR SALE— 250 bales of mixed 
hay. Henry Miller, Crittenden, 
Ky. 2t-ll* 



FOR SALE — Two fresh Jersey 
cows, 5 years old with calves by 
side. S. J. Dickerson, Morning 
View, Ky. 2t-ll* 



FOR SALE — 3 tons mixed hay and 
one riding cultivator, in good 
condition. Ray Sparks, Walton, 
Ky., R. 2. lt-11* 



PUBLIC SALE 

Having sold my farm I will sell at auction on the 
Florence and Burlington Pike near Limaburg 

SAT., FEB. 12th 

10:30 A. M.. (CWT) 

FARM IMPLEMENTS ;.*';. 

New 2-horse cultivator; 2-horse corn drill with fertilizer compart- 
ments; turning plows; tooth, acme & disk harrows; grass seed drill 
and hand sower; 2 single & 2 double shovel plows; dixie plow and 
other one horse plows; one horse & two horse sled; 2 wagons with 
box bed and hay frame; dump wagon; hay tedder; mowing machine; 
hay rake; horse drawn lawn roller; 2-horse field roller; manure 
spreader; triple, double, & single trees; 2 corn shelters; cutting box; 
hay fork, pulleys, and rope; hog crates and loading shute; ladders; 
10% rolls of New barbed wire; 2 Otawa log saw outfits; 40 gallon 
roofing paint; hand plant setter; tobacco sticks; 2 good tarpaulins; 
platform scales; all necessary hog killing tools, including extra good 
lard & sausage mill; 2-25 gal iron kettles; 1-15 gal iron kettle; fencing 
tools and woven wire stretchers ; lot of carpenter tools and vise, grind 
stone; moor emery wheel; cow chains; lot of burlap sacks; electric 
cream separator; milk can & buckets; 2 oil tanks; mattoxs, hoes, 
shovels, pitch forks, bolts, and other small tools; 1 '22 rifle; hay; some 
baled straw and corn. 

LIVESTOCK 
4 milk cows; 1 extra good belegian mare; 60 sheep to lamb in March. 
. HOUSEHOLD GOODS 

1 cook stove; coal hot blast heater; circulating heater; 2 gas cook 
stoves; perfection coal oil range; 3 sanitary folding beds; 3 bedsteads; 

2 wash stands; 1 bureau ; 2 grass rugs ; child's play pen and crib bed; 
1 feather bed; few chairs; 12 ft. extension table; small tables; sewing 
machine; wardrobe; victrola and records; 2 swing churns; hand 
churn; lard jars; odd lot of dishes; pans & iron pots; and other tools 
and articles too numerous to mention. 

• LUNCH SERVED ON GROUNDS 

TERMS-CASH 

Mrs. Sadie B. Tanner 



Col. Lute Bradford & Col. Worthington, Auctioneers 



L. E. Aylor, Clerk 



FOR SALE — One 9 year old horse, 
shoats, 1 Jersey cow and about 
40 bales of mixed hay. E. B. 
McClure, Verona, Ky., just off 
Highway 16, on Bracht Road. 
3t-U* 



FOR SALE— Baby crib and 
mattress — no draft head and 
foot, large rubber casters, $15.00, 
play pen for baby, maple, sturdy 
floor, $4.00; Reed baby carriage, 
ivory, rubber tires, $5.00. Mrs. 
Lawrence Turner. The above 
may be seen at Mrs. E. B. 
Wallace's, Main St., Walton, 
Ky., Phone 123. lt-11 



FOR SALE — Bed room suit, solid 
walnut; dining room suit, kit- 
chen cabinet and cupboard. 
Elizabeth Robinson, Bedinger 
Ave., North Walton. 2t-ll* 



GUITARS — $9.95 up; Roy Acuff 
and other books. Strings and 
accessories. Hanser Jewelry and 
Music, 515% Madison, Coving- 
ton, Ky. lt-11 



WANTED — To rent farm for cash 

75 to 100 acres — will furnish 

good references. Address replies 

to Walton Advertiser, % Box S 

2t-U* 



FOR SALE— 30 


shoats, 


weight 


about 


90 lbs. 


Pleasant 


Acres 


Farm, 


John L 


Feagan, 


Rich- 


wood 


Rd. 


2t- 


•11» . 



W; ANTED — To rent a house with 
5 or 6 rooms, with electricity 
and running water, in Walton. 
Mrs. Mattie Mayhugh, South 
Walton. lt-11* , 



LOST— Ration Book No. 4, With 
name, Mrs. Luella Watson, fin- 
der please return to owner ,or 
Boone County Ration Board. 
lt-11 



WANTED — Farm, to rent or buy; 
have my own tools, also, have 
two boys. I'd like to have 4 acres 
tobacco and other crops. Ray 
Sparks, Walton, R. 2. lt-11* 



FOR RENT — Farm, four acres 
tobacco base, 5 acres, more or 
less of corn; 10 or 12 acres hay; 
1 cow; garden; team; farm 
tools; house and wood furnish- 
ed. Write Box 1, Walton or call 
591X on Saturday only. T. T. 
Thomas. 2t-U* 



FOR SALE OR RENT — 6-room 
cottage, garage and garden, also 
store building and lot in Verona, 
Ky., Price reasonable. A. "C. 
Roberts, Verona, Ky. 3t-ll* 




j*o*o 



EW JAMES 



THEATRE 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 

SHOW EACH AND EVERY NITE 
AT 7:30 CENTRAL WAR TIME. 
SUNDAY MATINEE AT 2:30 
CENTRAL WAR TIME. BAR- 
GAIN NIGHTS MONDAY AND 
THURSDAY. 



All children regardless of age 
must have a ticket for each show. 
No parking allowed west of side- 
walk In front of Theatre or filling 
station adjoining. Police Orders. 



Ernst Lubitsch's 

HEAVEN CAN WAIT . 

with DON AMECHE 
FRI. & SAT., FEBRUARY 4-5th 



Red Skelton - Eleanor Powell 

- IDOODIT 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6th 



GOOD LUCK MR. YATES 

with CLAIRE TREVOR 
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7th 



GEORGE MONTGOMERY 
ANNABELLA in * 

BOMBER'S MOON 

with KENT TAYLOR 
TUES. & WED., FEB. 8-9th 



Robert Paige - Anne Gwynne 
Noah Beery, Jr. in 

FRONTIER BADMEN 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10th 



REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 



30 a. farm, modern house, electric, 
bath, good poultry house and 
barn. 

30 a. poultry farm, equipped for 
2000 hens. Ideal for hatchery 
which we need at Walton badly. 
Modern house and other good 
outbuildings. Good sale for 
produce right at home. 

40 a. farm, 1 mile from town. 

4 a. farm, good 6-room house, 
electric, garage, chicken house, 
smoke house. 

4-Room house and 1 acre ground 
in Walton. 

108 a. farm on state Rd., 6 acres 
tobacco base and good improve- 
ments. 

225 a. farm, 8 acre tobacco base. 
Good improvements. ** 
A. C. JOHNSON 

120 N. Main, Walton, Ky., Ph. 125 



FOR SALE— Chicks, eggs from 
high-producing, tested Reds. 
Don't delay, order early. Simplex 
brooders, Salsbury remedies. 
Grant Maddox, Florence, Ky., 
Phone 384. r 15t-9* 



FOR SALE— Store Building to be 
wrecked and remodeled. Cheap 
if sold at once. Apply John 
Code, Verona, Ky. 2t-10* 



LOST — Parker Fountain Pen, 
black and red stripes with gold 
band. Reward. Mary Ransler, 
Walton, Ky. 



LOST— R a t i o n Books, Billie 
Roberts, Emogene Roberts, Or- 
ville Ecklar, Lizzie Ecklar — No. 
3 books; Emogene Roberts and 
Lizzie Roberts-^Nof 4 books, lost 
January 15th. 2t-10* 



FARM FOR SALE— 123% acres, 
6-room house, barn 40X60 ft., 
new fencing, tractor land, 3 a. 
tobacco base. Reasonable terms. 
Elmer Elliston, Verona, Ky., Ph 
Walton 768. 3t-10* 



FOR SALE— Large size feather 
bed, in good condition, also 
dressing table with mirror. Mrs. 
Martha Wallace, Ph. Walton 30 
or 88 in the evening. 



WANTED— A tenant for the Will 
Willeford farm, near Concord, 
Gallatin Co. Tobacco base 4% 
acres. Plenty of ground for hay 
and corn. Mrs. Ed. Hopperton, 
Crittenden, R. 2. 2t-10* 



WANTED — A girl for general 
office work and waiting on 
customers. Brown Dry Cleaning 
Shop, Erlanger, Ky., Dixie 
Highway. <v 2t-10 



WANTED TENANT— For Stock 
Farm — No Tobacco. Owner will 
furnish all tools, house, 2 shoats, 
1 milk cow, 10 acres for own use 
and will pay $30.00 per month. 
Good trot line fishing in Lick* 
ing river, 6 miles from Coving- 
ton, Ky. A. G. Wern, Spring 
Lake Pk„ Spring Lake, Ky. 5t-9* 



WANTED TO BUY— Used fur- 
niture, good and bad; antiques; 
coins; old glassware; old pic- 
tures; books and buttons. John 
Stubblefied. Walton, Ky., R. 2. 
Phone 495. 6t-9* 



FOR RENT— One of the best 
tobacco farms in Carroll Co. 
with interest in sheep, beef, and 
dairy cattle. Come in and talk it 
over. Mrs. S. G. Tilton, Gent, 
Ky h 4t-7* 



A WALTON LADY SPIT 
UP ACID LIQUIDS FOR 
HOURS AFTER EATING 



For hours after every meal, a 
Walton lady used to spit up a 
strong, acidulous liquid mixed 
With pieces of half-digested food. 
She says it was awful. At times 
she would nearly strangle. She 
had stomach bloat, daily head- 
aches and constant irregular 
bowel action. Today, thjs lady 
eats her meals and enjoys them. 
And she says the change is due 
to taking ERB-HELP. Her food 
agrees with her. No gas, bloat or 
spitting up after eating. She is 
also free of headaches now, and 
bowels are regular, thanks to this 
Remarkable New Compound. 

ERB-HELP contains 12 Great 
Herbs; they cleanse bowels, clear 
gas from stomach, act on sluggish 
liver and kidneys. Miserable peo- 
ple soon feel different all over. So 
don't go on suffering! Get ERB- 
HELP. Jones Drug Store. 



FARMS FOR SALE 



THESE FARMS WILL PASS FOR 
FARMERS TENANT LOANS 

80 acres, Kenton Co., East side, 
nice 5-room house, one floor 
plan, summer kitchen, 2 chicken 
houses, metal corn crib, large 
barn, cistern and wells at house 
and barn, small 2-room tenant 
house, large garden, 2 acres 
fenced woven chicken wire, 
^rult ~and berries in garden, 
some bottom land, nice creek, 
good water year round, electric 
available, line runs through the 
farm. Widow owner must sell. 
Priced reasonable at $5500. 

80 acres near Latonia, good 5- 
room house, barn and outbuild- 
ings, all kinds of fruit and 
water, elefcw^in house, some 
farm tools and team extra if 
wanted, $8000. 

83 acres near Walton in Kenton 
Co., 2 houses, 2 barns, vacant, 
posession at once. This farm is 
watered & fenced. Price $6600. 
80 acres in Kenton County near 
Pendleton Line, 5-room house, 
electric in house, 2 barns, 30 a. 
alfalfa, 6 cows, all goes for 
$4600. 

REL C. WAYMAN 

623 Washington St., Cov., Ky. 
HEmlock 5107 Did. 5064 




JUST HOW OLD 

One thing you should know\ about any funeral 
directing firm is how much experience it has had . . . 
how old it is. We were founded 37 years ago, which 
means that we have behind us a great many years 
of practical experience. 

' CHAMBERS & GRUBBS 

Funeral Directors Phone Walton 352 



FOR SALE— 112 Acre Farm. All 
good land with 5.8 tobacco base. 
25 miles south of Covington. 6 
room house with electric. Large 
tobacco and stock barn. Chicken 
house, garage, etc. $12,000. For 
quick sale. Mrs. John Myers, 
Verona, Ky. 4t-10* 



WANTED — A tenant to raise 1.5 
acres of tobacco on shares and 
work balance of tin\e by month. 
Mrs. Stella Richardson, Morn- 
ing View, Ky. 2t-10* 



WASHERS REPAIRED — Author- 
ized Maytag Service, Maytag 
Oil. Wm. Hagedorn, 856 Dixie 
Highway, Erlanger, Ky. tf-49 



WANTED— A capable., house- 
keeper, must like children. 
. Address reply to Walton Adver- 
tiser> Dept. W., Walton, Ky. tf5 



20 YEARS In radio servicing. W. 
ML STEPHENSON. Radio Spec- 
' iatist, 509 Scott Blvd., Coving- 
ton. COlonial 1121. tf-lt 



NOTICE TO FARMERS 

WE HAVE TWO feJULDOZER'S IN THE 
WALTON AND VERONA 



NEIGHBORHOOD 



DIGGING PONDS 

To contact the operators, call Vest & Bartell's 
Office and reverse the charges 

Jefferson 0176 



-REGISTERED JERSEYS- 
WHY SELECTIVE REGISTRATION? 

Protects Buyer: Too many times the buyer has accepted an 
implied "guarantee" In the registration certificate that was 
not there in fact. Ancestry was guaranteed, but the KIND of 
ancestry was not. Buyers of Registered Jersey Bulls now have 
assurance that their interests are in part protected by a study 
of the production history in the immediate ancestry of their 
bull calf. 

HERD T B AND BANG TESTED 

S. WHITEHOUSE DUNLAP -FARM 

L. C. Fish, Herdsman, Richwood, Ky., U. S. No. 25 



DEAD STOCK REMOVED FREE 

For Prompt Removal of Horses and Cows 

CALL VALLEY 0887 

WE PAY TOONE CHARGES 

Ky. Dead Animal Disposal Co. 



LOCKLAND 




From whereTsIt . .* 

Jy Joe Marsh 



Doc Mitchell and I were chew- 
ing the rag recently about 
America's aims in this War. 

We agreed the four freedoms 
are 0. K., but a letter from 
Charlie Jenkins, in Italy, comes 
a lot closer home. 

"Just received a copy of my 
county paper," Charlie wrote. 

"Made me feel for a minute 
like I was back home again with 
all you folks. And when this job 
over here is done, I will be back 
— with everybody and every- 
thing just the same, 1 hope — 



just as pleasant and cheery as 
ever." . 

Well, we all know the things 
the boys want left "as is." The 
corner drugstore; taking a girl 
to a movie. The right to vote. 
The right to have a glass of beer 
if they want it. 

Keeping things the way Charlie 
and the boys remember them Is 
our obligation, here at home. 

From where I sit, that's part of 
what Charlie meant. 



^oetyUd^ 



© 1M4, SREWINO MOUSTRV FOUNDATION • KENTUCKY COMMITTEE 
■ARRYD. FRANCE. State Director. 1S23 KTMnW BUK, UMISVtUE 



TFA 









WALTON ADVERTISER 



— NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER — 
Devoted To the Interest of Boone, Kenton, Gallatin and Grant Countiea-Kenton-CampbeU Courier Consolidated With the \dvertuer 



Subscription $1.50 Per Year In Advance 



Local Homemakers 
Attend Farm 
And Home Week 



WALTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, February ioth, 1944 




Walton Boy Taking Medical 
Technicians' Course. 



The program of Farm and Home 
Week was considered exceptionally 
good by the six homemakers from 
Boone County who attended the 
four day meetings. Eleven others 
attended one or more days pro- 
grams. 

The local group were par- 
ticularly interested in the Wed- 
nesday program which was de- 
voted to descriptions of life in' 
occupied countries and in prison 
camps. Miss Margareth Roed, who 
had escaped from Norway, felt 
that "perpetual vigilance is the 
price of liberty." Madame Chu 
She-Ming told how the Chinese 
are trying to minimize hate so 
that a lasting peace will have a 
firmer foundation after World 
War No. Two. 

Highlights of Farm and Home 
Week will be given at each Home- 
makers Club during - the latter 
part of February and March. 

Those who attended part or all 
of the program-are Mrs. Albert 
Willis, Mrs. Albert Pfalzgraf and 
Mrs. Jonas Stevens, Bullittsville ; 
Mrs. Vernon Pope; Burlington; 
Mrs. John Schram, Mrs. Joe Berk- 
shire, Mrs. Harold Conner, Mrs. 
Clyde Arnold, and Mrs. John Mar- 
tin, Florence; Mrs Gilbert Stewart 
Verona; Mrs. W. F. Mann, Mrs. 
John L. Vest, Mrs. Hess Vest, Mrs. 
Alan Gaines, Mrs. Alta Chambers, 
Mrs. J. C. Bedinger, Walton; and 
"Mary Hood Gillespie, Home De- 
monstration Agent. 



Three members of the Army 
Service Forces unit at Borden 
General Hospital, Chickasha, 
Oklahoma, are to pursue a Med- 
ical Technicians' course of in- 
struction. They are: Pfc. Charles 
W. Hurt, 511 Oakwood Street, 
Havana, Illinois; Pvt. Frank A. 
Allmann, 23 Immel St., Rochester, 
N. Y., and Pvt. Virgil L. Jump, R. 
F. D. No. 1, Waltton, Kentucky. 

These men are to take a two to 
four months' course at Brooke 
General Hospital, Fort Sam Hous- 
ton, Texas, after which they will 
return to Borden General Hos- 
pital, resuming work with the 
station complement. 



Local Home Food 
Production 
Contest Planned 



Fellowship Meeting Held At 
Local Methodist Church. 



Laymen's Meeting. 



A very interesting meeting was 
held Sunday morning at the 
Methodist Church by the Lay- 
men of the church. 

Bruce Wallace being leader of 
the program. Rev. D. E. Bedinger 
read the scripture lesson and 
offered prayer, "The Present and 
Future Needs of the Church" was 
given by Grover Young, "A Christ- 
ian Church", by Guy Olen Carlisle, 
"An Evangelistic Church", by 
Clifford Pruitt, "A Fellowship 
Church", by Charlie Carlisle and 
"A Missionary Church" by Reamy 
Simpson, 



NOTICE— 

The Homemakers Club will 
postpone their regular meeting 
from February 11th to February 
18th on account of the death of 
Mrs. C. C. Sleet. It will meet at 
the home of Mrs. Barnett Franks. 



A Fellowship Meeting was held 
at the Methodist Church on 
Thursday evening for members of 
the church board and also the 
Happy Helpers Class. 

After a covered dish luncheon 
the Pastor, Rev. C. G. Dearing in- 
troduced the speaker, Rev. Elmer 
K. Kidwell of Florence. Rev. Kid- 
well took as his topic "Are We As 
Christians, on the Home Front, 
Measuring Up". Are we* going to 
measure up to what our fighting 
forces are expecting of us when 
they return home? This is a quest- 
ion for one and all. Are we pre- 
serving the things they are fight- 
ing for? Rev. Kidwell's talk was 
much enjoyed and appreciated by 
all present. 

Members and guests present 
were: Rev. Kidwell, Rev. D. E. 
Bedinger, Rev. C. G. Dearing, Mrs. 
D. E. Bedinger, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. 
Bedinger, Mr. and Mrs. E. B. 
Wallace, Mr. and Mrs. Howard 
Stephenson, Mrs. Rosa Ballinger 
and Rosaline, Mrs. G. C. Young, 
Mrs. John Vest, Mr. and Mrs. W. 
O. Rouse, Mrs. Sam J. Hudson, 
Louise Dearing, Geraldine Simp- 
son and Miss Emma Jane Miller. 

At the close of the fellowship 
meeting the members of the 
Happy Helpers Class gathered in 
their class room for a short 
business session to complete plans 
for serving sandwiches at the 
Simon-Kenton basketball game on 
Tuesday, Feb. 8th. The class has 
lost quite a few members and are 
taking this plan to help raise 
funds for their pledge to the 
church budget. 

Class members present were: 
Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Carlisle, Mr. 
and Mrs. E. B. Wallace, Mrs. Sam 
J. Hudson, Mrs. Mary Stephen- 
son, Rev. D. E. Bedinger, teacher 
and Miss Emma Jane Miller. 

In the absence of the president, 
Mr. Pruitt, the vice-president, 
Mrs. C. O. Carlisle presided. 



Boone County "Live at Home" 
program leaders met at Burling- 
ton last Wednesday afternoon to 
plan ways to encouraging greater 
home food production in 1944 
The leaders recommended the 
following program to be carried 
out. 

• 1. Every family attempt to 
raise all the home food require 
ments possible and to can, store, 
preserve and use these foods, so 
that every rural family has an 
abundant supply of highly nutrit- 
ious foods. 

2. A county contest will be held 
this winter in which the rural 
family that does the best job of 
producing and storing for winter 
receive a special prize. The prize 
to be sponsored by local business 
organizations. The winners of the 
contest will be judged by a special 
committee approved by the Home- 
makers Organization. 

3. One or more garden demon- 
strations in each community. 

4.0ne or more canning demon- 
strations in each community to be 
sponsored by Homemakers Clubs. 

5. Timely news articles on food 
production. 

6. Special information letters to 
all garden leaders. 

7. Hold poultry production 
meetings on March 1st. 

8. Distribute leaflets on improv- 
ed garden, canning and other 
home food production practices 
thru Homemaker Clubs and 4-H 
Clubs. 

9. Sponsor food production de- 
monstration at 4-H Rally Day and 
the Fair. 

10. Each Homemaker Club and 
Community Agricultural Improve- 
program Committee has elected 
special home food production 
leaders to assist in carrying out 
a better home food production 
program this year. 




VOLUME 30— to^JMBER 12 



February Meeting Held By 
Women's Missionary Society. 



The Sebruary meeting of the 
Missionary Society of .the Walton 
Christian Church met at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Harris Moore. 

After a delicious covered dish 
luncheon the meeting was called 
to order by the President, Mrs. 
Harris Moore. After the business 
session a very interesting program 
was given on "Christian Ventures 
in Learning and Living". 

Members and guests present 
were: Mrs. Ora Pry, Mrs. Scott 
Chambers, Mrs. Mary Johnson, 
Mrs. Pearl Pink, Rev. and Mrs. 
George Caroland, Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Moore; Miss Corinne 
Moore, Miss Elicia Neumeister, 
Miss Mary Ransler, Miss Ruth 
Fink, Mrs. Harry Bird, Mrs. Jane 
Sleet, Mrs. George Fisher, Mrs. 
Katie Ransler, Mrs. Lulu Howard. 
Mrs. Katie Welsh, Mrs. Mary 
Alice Conrad, Mrs. Susie Norman, 
Mrs. Grace Jones, Mrs. Lulu Hud- 
son, Mrs. Lena Harris from Ft. 
Thomas, Mrs. Lola Bolington, 
Mrs. Mary Houston, Mrs. Fannie 
Brittenhelm and the host and 
hostess, Mr. and Mrs. Harris 
Moore. 



County Farmers 
Plan Pasture And 
Hay Improvements 



Local W. M. S. To Meet 



Goshen Christian Church To 
Dedicate Flag For Service Men. 



Bonfert — Goodridge 

The marriage of Mr. Walter 
Bonfet and Miss Mildred Good- 
ridge was solominized at the home 
of the brides parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Elmer^Goodridge of Garvey 
Ave., Erlanger, Saturday after- 




noon at 4 p. m. by Rev. R. F. De- 
Moisey. Mr. Perry Davis and Miss 
Frida Bonfert were the attendants. 
A large crowd of relatives and 
friends were present. 

Mr.- Bonfert is stationed at 
Camp Maxie, Texas and was home 
on a furlough. After a short 
honeymoon he will return to 
Camp. Mrs. Bonfert will remain 
with her parents for the duration. 



Sunday evening, February 13 th 
at 7:30 the Goshen Christian 
Church will dedicate a flag of 30 
stars with honor roll, with 
names of boys who are serving in 
the Armed Forces. Everyone is in- 
vited to attend. Rev. Cecil McKee 
will has a special sermon for this 
occassion. Please CMie to be with 
our loved ones in spirit. 



Kenton County Fruit Growers 
To Study Production Problems. 
Two Meetings Scheduled in Co. 



Mr. and Mrs. Nick Trapp of 
Green Road were business visitors 
in Walton Tuesday afternoon. " 



HOW'RE YOUR EYES? 

Practically every "vital" field of 
work helpful to National Defense 
demands eorrect — or Corrected! — 
vision. Industry, military, civil 



service — all pass or reject accord- 
ing to ydur Eyesight, finally! Let 
us examine your Sight, today. 



Woman's Literary Club 



isjy.« 



DR. J. O. TYSON 

Optometrist 
OFFICES WITH 



MOTCH 

Optician — Jewelers 
613 MADISON AVE. COVINGTON, KY. 

Established 1857 



Mrs. B. W. Franks entertained 
in her lovely home in South Wal- 
ton the February meeting of the 
Walton Literary Club. 

Mrs. Sam B. Sleet opened the 
meeting by reading two selections, 
"Washington" and "A Picture" in 
celebration of the birtlidays of 
Lincoln and Washington. This was 
followed by aprayer by Mrs. W. O. 
Rouse. 

. Mrs. C. F. Blankenbeker, the 
president, presided during the 
business session. The thought for 
the day was given in a pleasing 
manner by Mrs, George S. Caro- 
land, who based her subject on 
"The many things that are and 
can be accomplished thru a little 
Praise and Recognition from 

other people." ~ — 

The highlight of the afternoon 
was an excellent talk on citizen- 
ship given by Mrs. J. Collis Ringo 
of Lexington, Ky. Mrs. Ringo 
Chose as her subject "We Amer- 
icans— iWho Are We?," which she 
presented in a very interesting' 
and pleasing manner. 

Delightful refreshments were 
served to the following guests and 
members: Mrs. J. Collis Ringo of 
Lexington, Mrs. C. J. Alford of 
Anchorage, Mrs. C. B. Gordon, 
Mrs. Lula Vest. Members present 
were: Mrs. E. B. Wallace, Mrs. J. 
L. Vest, Mrs. D. H. Vest, Mrs. Sam 
B. Sleet, Mrs. W. W. Rouse, Mrs. 
W. O. Rouse, Mrs. G. C. Ransom, 
Mrs. John Myers, Miss Emma 
Jane Miller, Mrs. H. F. Mann, 
Mrs. Robert Moore, Mrs. A. R. 
Johnson, Mrs. Cloyd Johnson, 
Mrs. Clayton Jones, Mrs. A. H. 
Gaines, Mrs. E. E. Fry, Mrs. J. R. 
Conrad, Mrs. C. S. Chambers, Mrs. 
G. S. Caroland, Mrs. John Boyer, 
Mrs. C. F. Blankenbeker and Mrs. 
J. C. Bedinger. 



Mr. W. W. Magill, Extension 
Horticulturist, from the 'College 
of Agriculture, Lexington, Ky. will 
meet with fruit growers to study 
production problems in tree fruits 
and small fruits; apples, Reaches, 
plums, grapes, strawberries, rasp- 
berries and other fruits. 

The meetings will be held in two 
sections of the county and both 
meetings will be on central war 
time. Tuesday, February 15th, 
1944, 10:00 a. m. at the farm of 
John W. Schumacher, on the 
Taylor Mill Road about three 
miles south of Latonia and 1:30 
P. m. at the farm of Robert R. 
Scott, in the Crescent Springs 
section, about 2^ miles north 
from Crescent Springs. 



Prominent Walton Lady 
Passes Wednesday. 



As we go to press we learn the 
sad news of the death of Mrs. Lee 
Sleet, wife of Mr. C. C. Sleet of 
South Walton. 

Funeral services will be held at 
Hughes Chapel, Friday, Feb. 11th 
at 11 a. m. with burial in the 
church cemetery. 

More particulars will be given 
next week. 



Baptist Church 



The W. M. S. of Walton Baptist 
Church will meet in threVhurch 
Wednesday, February 16. Business 
session at II o'clock with Mrs. 
Wm. Soden, president in the chair. 
Lunch at noon followed by social 
hour. Program A 1:3^0, Mrs. Mar- 
garet Wilson, leader in charge. 
Topic for month, "Africa Steps 
Into the World Life." 



4-H Crops Average $54.90 



Miss Janet Pope, a member of 
the Grant 4-H Club, sold 294 
pounds of tobacco for an average 
of $54.90 per hundred pounds. 
Janet completed two Home 
Economics projects in addition to 
her tobacco project. 



Brother Winston Crawley of the 
Baptist Seminary of Louisville will 
preach at the . Walton Baptist 
Church Sunday . morning and 
evening. 



Mrs. Nettie Fullilove Vest 



Mrs. Nettie Fullilove Vest, wife 
of Thomas N. Vest died Wednes- 
day, February 2nd. She was 75 
years old. 

She is survived by her husband 
and two sisters, Mrs. Robt. Powers, 
Walton, Ky.; and Mrs. Daisey 
Stone, Covington, Ky. 

Funeral services were held at 
Chambers and Grubbs funeral 
home Saturday, February 5th at 
2 p. m. with Rev. R. F. DeMoisey 
in charge. Burial was in the Wal- 
ton Cemetery. 



Auction Sale 

Harold Bacon ar.ounces a pub- 
lic auction on his premises, know 
as the Doud farm, Route 42, near 
Beacon Light, Beaver, Ky., Sat- 
urday, Feb. 12, 2 p. m. 

The sale will include a number 
of farm implements, a Fordson 
tractor, plow, harrows, mowing 
machines, etc., as well as some 
household articles, chickens and 
miscellaneous items. 

The auction will be under the 
direction of Rel C. Wayman, 623 
Washington St., Covington. 



Pasture and hay improvement 
are the two major agricultural 
improvement problems in Boone 
County, according to H. R. Fork- 
ner, County Agent. Farmers in ten 
community agricultural improve- 
ment planning meetings held dur- 
ing the past" three weeks were 
unamimous in their opinions on 
this need. They also recommended; 
the growing of the full tobacco 
allotments as a source of increased 
cash crop income. 

Pasture forms the cheapest 
source of all livestock reed. Seven 
pounds of good pasture are equal 
to 1 and one third pounds of corn 
or 1 lb. of soybean meal. Abun- 
dance of cheap feed is the most 
sound basis for all livestock pro- 
duction. One acre of excellent 
pasture is equal in total feeding 
value to a 64 bushel corn crop. 
Hay is the second cheapest source 
of feed and ranks next in impor- 
tance to good pasture. 

Good pasture has been one of 
the most misunderstood and un- 
der valuated crops produced on the 
farm. The leaders in planning the 
1944 agricultural program have 
recommended a year round graz- 
ing program that will start in the 
fall, with early sown small grains 
and legumes that occasionally 
furnish some pasture during the 
winter months and greatly reduce 
the hay requirements during the 
early spring. The small grain 
pasture would be followed with 
high quality permanent pastures 
with good lespedeza pastures in 
the fall. 

Farmers are faced with high 
priced seeds and less available 
labor. Regardless "of seed prices 
every farmer should seed well all 
land ready for seeding this spring. 
At least two grasses and two le- 
gumes should be seeded. Lime, 
phosphate, m manure a/icUin many 
cases division ditches"*^ great 
help to higher production. 

Contrary to general opinion 
the county rates high to quality 
pastures and hay production 
compared to the adjoining surplus 
corn and hay producing areas. 



John N. Berkshire 



Our Fighting Men Are Watching You! 
Help Boone County Make Its Quota 



Yes, it's true!. Fighting men 
from this very county — perhaps 
from you own home — are waiting 
to hear the welcome word that 
we've passed our 4th War Loan 
goal! 

Of course they don't talk about 
it. Neither do they talk abo.ut 
their chances of coming back. 
And there's a connection all right. 
They're risking their lives— tf or 
you. Listen to Secretary of War 
Stimson, himse lf: 

'Every Bond you purchase 
helps protect and save 
from the missiles of their 
enemies the lives of 
American men who are 
fighting for you ... You 
will never have a clearer 
or better opportunity of 
saving American life by 
the investment of your 
money." 

There are battles coming — 
tough, bloody, hard-to-win battles 

-before this war is over. And 
while our boys are invading and 
clawing their way onto strange 
shores — for us — shaM we here 
in this typical American county 
surrender by failing to do our 
part in reaching our 4th War 
Loan quota? That would be equal 
to losing a battle! 

It all depends on you! Obviously 
we can't make our county quota 
unless you first make yours. In 
the same way, the state and nat- 
ional quotas depend for success 
on what we and other communit- 



ies do — on what you do! Your 
quota is clear — buy at least one 
extra $100 Series E War Bond. 
Invest more if you possibly can— 
$200, $300, $400 — invest to the 
very limit of your ability. Think 
how welcome the' $4.00 for $3.00 
you get when you invest in Series 
E War Bonds will be when these 
Bonds mature, and the war is won. 
And think how welcome the news 
will be to our fighting men when 
we- have gone over the top in 
making our 4th War Loan quota. 
Do your part today! 

*— Display Your Colors 
Place a window sticker! in your 
window. Invest to the limit in 4th 
War Loan Bonds — anil display 
this red, white and blue emblem in 
your window to show you're proud 
of doing your part! 

Subscriptions for the past week 
in Boone County in the Fourth 
War Loan Drive amount to 
$91,298.25, making a total of 
$289,285.75 subscribed to date in 
this drive. This is just a little over 
55% of the quota of $500,000.00 
for this county. Hebron and 
Bullittsville have joined the honor 
roll with Belleview and Beaver in 
having exceeded their quota. Bur- 
lington precinct has subscribed 
$50,868.75 on its quota of $68,483.- 
54. Figures on other precincts are 
not available. Some heavy work 
and heavy subscriptions will have 
to be forthcoming before February 
15th if Boone County raises its 
quota. . . 



John N. Berkshire passed away 
at his home in Petersburg Mon- 
day, February 7th following a 
long illness. He was 79 years old. 

Mr. Berkshire is survived by 
his widow, Mrs. Elizabeth Berk- 
shire; one daughter, Mrs. Max 
Gridley, Petersburg, Ky., and one 
son, Frank Berkshire, Lawrence- 
burg, Ind. 

Services, were conducted at 
the Petersburg Christian Church 
Wednesday at 2 p. m. with burial 
in Petersburg Cemetery. 

Chambers and Grubbs were in 
charge of the funeral arrange- 
ments. 

Services were conducted Tues- 
day at 11 o'clock at Hughes 
Chapel with Rev, O. M. Simmer- 
man in charge, assisted by Rev. 
I Roy Johnson of Burlington and 
Rev. S. B. Godbey of 
Chapel. Burial was in Hughes 
Chapel Cemetery. 

Mrs. Brown is survived by her 
husband, Wm. Brown; seven 
brothers, John Beil, Burlington; 
Carl Beil, Bromley; David Beil, 
Cresent Springs; * Harvey Beil, 
JManger; Jacob Beil, Ludlow; on e 
sister, Mrs. Margaret Glass.'Bronw 
ley; and two children, Scott Jones 
and Wanda Lee Jones. 



Family Dinner 



Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Percival 
of the Walton and Nicholson 
Highway entertained Sunday with 
a turkey dinner for their family, 
Mr. and Mrs. Reed Hume and 
daughter, Elaine and son Buddie 
of Covington; Mrs. T. F. Ander- 
son of Ashland, Ky; L. C. Percival, 
Mr. and Mrs E. F. Vallandingham, 
Mrs. Jane Webber of the 7 L, 
Highway, Miss Helen Percival of 
Orlando, Fla., and Mrs. Sarah 
Rouse. A most pleasant day was 
spent together. 

Mrs. Anderson left Monday for 
her home and Miss Helen Per- 
cival returned to her Flordia home 
later in the week. 



Local Red Cross 
Nursing Activities 



Holidays Returned! 



Frankfort, Ky., February 7th — 
(AP) — Kentucky got back all her 
holidays Monday, Feb. 7th. 

Governor Willis signed a bill 
repealing a 1942 law that limited 
for the war's duration state holi- 
days to Independence Day, Labor 
Day and Christmas, 
j The repealer, sponsored by 
I banks and other interests, had 
an emergency clause making it 
effective immediately. 

In addition to the three allowed 
under the 1942 act, the others 
that regain recognition are New- 
year's Day; Lee's Birthday, Jan- 
uary 19; Lincoln's Birthday, Feb- 
ruary 12; Washington's Birthday, 
February 22; Decoration Day, 
May 30; Confederate . Memorial 
Day, June 3; Columbus Day, Oc- 
tober 12, and Armistice Day, No- 
vember 11. — Enquire. 



All schools have been visited 
during the past month, and health 
Hughesj inspection done in most of them. 
Immediately following these in- 
spections the nurse visits as many 
homes of chldren with marked 
defects, as time permits. The re- 
sults are very gratifying. In most 
instances parents get' right to 
work to make needed corrections. 
Now that the Home Nursing. 
Group in Walton High School has 
completed the course, another 
class has been started in Hebron 
High School. Hebron was select- 
ed because an authorised Home 
Economics Instructor may give a 
part of this work and there is not 
enough time left in the school 
year for the nurse to do it all. 

Due to the present shortage o£ 
doctors and nurses, the National 
Red Cross is stressing Home Nurs- 
ing Classes, probably more than 
any phase of Public Health Nurs- 
ing at the present time. 

When school is "out, the county 
nurse^win have time for a number 
of classes. Any place in Boone 
County desiring this course, may 
have it at that time, if the request 
comes in before other plans have 
been made to take, the nurse's 
time. There should be from twelve 
to twenty in a group. 

Requests may be made to R. I. 
Rouse, Chapter Chairman, Mrs. 
Walter Ferguson, Chairman of 
Nursing Committee or Elizabeth 
Lowry, County Red Cross Nurse. 



r 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



Thursday, February 10, 1944 



Btwomw 



(ftm Ac m) 




: only lit an acre and took only 
■ few minute* to make the difference in 
tfaa te»t plot* shown above. Inocula- 
tion of taad with NITR AGIN not only 
boosts yield* of soybeans, alfalfa, clov- 
en and other legume*, it alao increase* 
Jirptein content, and helps build soil 
ertiiity — adding as much as 50 to 130 
lbs. of nitrogen to the acre. It pay* to 
inoculate every planting of soybeans, 
and other legumes regardless of pre- 
vious cropping. NITRAGIN i* the 
most widely used inoculant. Get it front 
your seedsman ... in the yellow 




. . . Leek tor fee essa* 
Nmt AGIN wfcea yee bey. 



Mil BOOKltTS 
Writ* for In* pacta of 



bow to grow liiggss. non 
profitoVk soybasas, alfalfa. 



tW Mtara 0a, he , Ml I . ssst. It. 



Old Testament in Hebrew 

The Old Testament is now being 
published in Hebrew in Palestine, 
the first time in history that a com- 
plete edition of this book has been 
produced in its original language 
in its native country. 




LEW BURNET has returned from 
Wyoming to southern Texas n UTS, to 
lake a Job as trail boss for TOM AR- 
NOLD, owner of the Cross T ranch. On 
the way he gets nsws from WILLY 
KICKLB, and meets four luiplcloui-aet- 
tnc men. Tom Arnold tells Lew that ha 
la moving with Us herd to Wyoming, 
and that he la trying to make good the 
losses sustained when the bank at Ox 
Bow was robbed. Tom tears that his 
son STEVE may be Involved. Tom alto 
says that he must deliver three thousand 
head of cattle to the Indian agent at 
Ogallala by September 1 or lose a profit- 
able contract. Lew talks to JOT AR- 
NOLD, who Is .engaged to the foreman, 
CLAY MANNING. 



FIRST CHOICE 
OF MILLIONS 

None faster. None surer. None safer. 
8t Joseph Aspirin —world's largest seller 
at 10c. Save most in larger ajaaa. 36 tab- 
lets, 20)!; 100 tablets, only 35*. Why ever 
pay more? Demand St. Joseph Aspirin. 



COLDS! 

ROBBERS OF HEALTH 



Don't fool with a cold! Neglected, It 
may easily develop Into a more seri- 
ous condition. Rest— avoid exposure. 
And for usual cold miseries, get 
Grove'* Cold Tablet*. They're like a 
doctor'* prescription— that Is, a mul- 
tiple medicine. Work on all these 
symptom* of a cold . . . headache- 
body achee-wfever— nasal stuffiness. 
Why lust suffer along? Take Grove's 
Cold Tablets exactly as directed. Ask 
your druggist for Grove'* Cold Tablets 
—for fifty years known to millions aa 
"Bromo Quinine" Cold Tablets! 
Save Money— Get large Economy Six* 



GROVE'S fd 

COLD TABLETS^ 




Early Prophet 

Roger Bacon, living in the 13th 
century, predicted the automobile 
and steamship. 



Gas on Stomach 



Relieved Ui5i 

When nmi stomach add causes palnful'ioffocat- 
tns saa. tour stomach and heartburn, doctor* usoally 
present* tbs fartat-acting medicines known for 
symptomatic relief— medicines like those In Bell-sas 
Tablets. No Mutative. Bell-ana brings comfort In a 
SW 1 ordouble your money back en return of botus 




ITCH or" 
MINOR SKIN 
RASHES 



MEXSANA 



SOOTHINw MEDICATED POWDER 



Gather Your Scrap; ik 
* Throw It at Hitler! 



Black ^Jic/ 
Leaf 40 



JUST A 

DASH IN FEATHERS. 



OR SPREAD ON ROOSTS 



AT FIRST 
iSIMOFA 



* use 666 

TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DROPS 



c 



CHAPTER IT 

"I refused and they started mak- 
ing up a herd of their own. Buying 
at the cheap price now, they'll save 
fifty thousand dollars if they get to 
Ogallala with that herd . . . and I 
don't with mine," Tom continued. 

"Sure," Lew said, "sure." and a 
sudden restless Impatience goaded 
him up onto his long legs. "But 
that's a game two can play, Toml 
What's the matter here anyway? 
If a stampede Is their deal give 'em 
one back. You've come up through 
enough trouble to know all the 
tricks." 

Unaroused, Arnold said quietly, 
'I've let Clay handle this." 

Lew's glance sharpened on him. 
"If trouble's bound to come," he 
said, "I'd rather settle it now than 
on the trail. There'll be grief enough 
later. Does Clay know I'm to trail 
boss for you?" 

"Not yet." Arnold's dark eyes lift- 
ed. He smiled. "I'm glad to know 
you've still got an edge on you! 
That's what I've been counting on, 
that and a proposition I'm going to 
make." His gruff bluntness returned. 
"Now don't get it into your fool head 
that this is a gift. I've got my own 
good and selfish reasons." 

Looking down pastHhe man. Lew 
saw the breathless way in which 
Joy was watching him, her lips part- 
ed, all of her body held very still. 
And Tom was saying, "I want you 
to take a share in this Cross T herd. 
A trade. You've got that land in 
Wyoming. I've got cattle and no 
place to range them. I'm adding a 
thousand head of shes and yearlings 
to the beef contract. That thousand 
head will make a start on the new 
ranch— half for Joy and Steve, half 
for you." 

It was a generous offer, more than 
generous, all that he would need, 
but with a price that neither of 
these two understood. Silenced by 
that knowledge, he stared down into 
the firelight so long that behind him, 
almost in anger, Arnold's gruff voice 
burst out, "Well? What's the trou- 
ble now?" 

"Tom," he said, "I'm sorry. I'll 
boss your herd north, and you can 
use my range in Wyoming. But I 
can't tie myself as a Cross T part- 
ner." He saw a sharp breath drawn, 
between the girl's parted lips and. 
the old man's sudden blank amaze- 
ment. "You forget Clay Manning," 
he said. "That makes a fourth one 
in this deal after a while. There 
wouldn't be room." 



"I didn't know myself," she said, 
"until tonight K s Steve. They've 
had terrible times this year. And 
yet Steve means everything to him. 
He sees Steve throwing his life sway 
and it takes his own life right out 
of him." She looked up gravely. 
"Lew, you could have helped more 
than you did." 

Staring off into the room's dark- 
ness, he said, "I'll go up the trail, 
but that's all. I can't promise about 
the ranch." 

"Lew." Her hands sUd down to 
his wrists. "Why, Lew?" Her voice 
was low and hushed. "Tell me 
Why not?" 

He turned his head and looked 
down at her then; she was a woman 
with all of a woman's understand- 
ing and yet must hear a man say 
what was already plain enough. He 
saw the fullness and roundness be- 
neath the tight red cloth of her 
dress giving her no longer the inno- 
cence of a little girl, and there was 
that breathless wait in her eyes. 

That controlled moment suddenly 
left him. He caught her and pulled 
her up hard In his arms. Once be- 
fore tonight he had kissed her; yet 
that for both of them was a kiss of 
meeting. He drew her up now with 
a violent urge to stir in her what was 
so mad inside himself. For an in- 
stant she was rigid, and then she 
was clinging to him with a turbulent 
strength. 

He let her go as suddenly as he 
had caught her and stood back, 
shaken and staring. 

Her voice choked. "Lew, I didn't 
know." She leaned against" the man- 
tel edge. 

"You know now." 

"Yes." She looked at him, pain 
and despair coming into her dark 
eyes. 



He awoke in the morning with 
the green streak of dawn beyond 



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GROW 



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VIGOROUS 



HUSKY / 



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ty Mawj Dtct*n 



1$ ^/SCOTT'S 
EMULSION 

- Great Yt.tr- Round Tonic 



He was aware of Joy's deeper qui- 
etness and of the fixed stare of her 
eyes upon him, and then in that mo- 
ment's silence an abrupt rhythm of 
riders pounded across the ranch 
yard. 

It was Clay Manning's shout that 
sailed in to them, and then the thud 
of his boots hit the gallery outside, 
swinging down from saddle to floor 
edge as he always did, with his horse 
hardly at a stop. ' 

The door burst open and he came 
in like a gust of prairie wfnd, filling 
the roorn with that charged and vi- 
tal force. 

In the doorway he turned his head 
and called back outside, "It's all 
right, kid," and then came on in 
to Joy. He put one arm all the 
way around her in intimate posses- 
sion, hugged her hard; and at the 
same time, while he made that show, 
be was grinning and saying, "Glad 
to see the old home ranch again, 
Lew?" 

"Sure," he said, "sure"," and 
looked past him at Steve coming in 
now, wondering what Clay's call, 
"It's all right, kid," had meant 

Halfway across the room Steve 
asked, almost with a small boy's 
truculence, "What did you want me 
tor, Dad?" 

"Wondered where you were," Ar- 
nold said. "What happened?**— — 

"Good lord! That all? Nothing 
happened! Only got separated from 
the bunch." It was not until then 
that he faced around with a casual 
greeting, "How's Wyoming?" 

"Fine, Steve," Lew said. "Pine if 
you dodge the Sioux. Didn't get 
my hair lifted yet!" 

There had been a little awkward 
wait With sudden nervous unrest 
Steve flung himself from the fire- 
place mantel. He spoke to his fa- 
ther, "If that's all you wanted—" 
And then, "Come on, Clay. Lefs 
go!" He started across the room. 

The rush of their horses' hoofs 
died from the ranch yard and the 
night's deep silence came again. 
Tom Arnold moved from the fire- 
place. He looked suddenly, old and 
tired. "I'm going to bed." 

When the distant door had closed 
he faced Joy's small figure standing 
dark against the red embers of the 
fire. 

"Joy," he asked, "what's hap- 
pened? I mean to your father.'* 




Lew climbed up on a steep slant 
wooded with pine. 

his window, and the tempest of 
last night's feeling with Joy was 
gone. He could see his way clearly 
again. 

In the warm, steamy kitchen he 
found Tom Arnold and Clay Man- 
ning with a third man who was a 
stranger to him. 

Arnold said, "Morning, Lew. 
Guess you don't know Ed Splann. 
This is Burnet Splann, the fellow 
we were talking about who's going 
to trail-boss for me." 

"Howdy," Splann grunted, looked 
up and dropped his head again. 

By the time he sat down to the 
table Clay and Ed Splann had fin- 
ished eating. They stood up at once, 
dropped their dishes into Owl-Head's 
wooden washtub and went out to- 
gether. 

"What's .holding* Clay's tongue? 
Got a grouch on this morning?" 

Tom Arnold could be mild at 
strange times. He said gently, "Go 
easy with Clay, Lew. He didn't take 
much to the idea of your being here 
to trail-boss for me. You can't blame 
him. He's been north twice him- 
self." / 

"But not for two years, Tom, and 
trail conditions change over night 
Clay knows that" 

"He'll smooth out," Arnold said, 
"when we get started." 

"When will that be? What's left 
to be done?" He felt a sudden 
blocked irritation. There was some- 
thing here that he wanted to slash 
through. "Hell's little fishes, Tom, 
there's been time enough!" 

"You'd know better than that if 
you had been here," Arnold said. 
"We've been hounded on every side. 
Clay says we'll leave day after to- 
morrow. I'd hoped today. Road- 
branding is all that's left to do. I 
bought some mixed herds the past 
two years. We've got to get those 
all under the Cross T." 

"How many, Tom?" 

"A thousand head about" 

Briefly Lew figured. A thousand 
head . .' . ten hours. There was a 



trick he knew. But Clay Manning 
was still the foreman here; and then 
Tom Arnold'.s look hardened and he 
was saying, "I'll be eternally 
damned If a man can be every- 
where! Moonlight Bailey's still my 
horse wrangler and a good one, but 
he's let the remuda drift I guess. 
He told me last night we're thirty 
head short We'll hunt them to- 
day." 

"Try Crazy Woman," Lew offered. 
"I saw tracks." He explained no 
more. In a moment with his break- 
fast finished, he said, "Since I'm 
not signed on the pay roll yet I'll 
take a little cruise this' morning 
alone." 

Ha saw Arnold's glance lift sharp- 
ly and drop. It was not his way to 
question a man. 

Even as he watched eastward Lew 
could see dust clouds layered above 
the advancing columns, some of 
them forty miles away. Closer, 
where Ox Bow town made a hand- 
ful of gray adobe cubes scattered 
beside the new railroad, a dark 
swarm moved out slowly, taking the 
arrowhead trail formation. 

He straightened in a moment 
squinting to sharpen the focus of 
what his roving gaze had caught 

A lone rider was coming out from 
that herd near town, the hoofs of bis 
running horse shooting up puffs of 
dust like exploded bombs. He came 
on incredibly fast Still out on the 
plain, he veered toward the low hills 
that rimmed the eastern side of 
the valley and was lost in there for 
perhaps ten minutes. When he came 
out his pace had slowed to a walk. 
Like that unhurried, he moved into 
the Cross T roundup camp at the 
valley's mouth. 

"Now then," Lew asked, "what 
kind of coyote business was that?" 

With his gaze led to the roundup 
camp by that lone rider he watched 
the work going on below him. It 
brought a sudden scowl to the steady 
set of his hazel eyes. Half a dozen 
branding fires sent their smoke into 
the still air. He could see the small 
darting figures of mounted men cut 
into the pool of cattle and come 
out, each with his single animal at 
a rope's end. There were a thou- 
sand steers to be road-branded, so 
Tom Arnold had said. They'd never 



»^> , <(«v^«y»>^*«>»'sa»a > av*»s>»»^«*aaa^aaaaa^«»*s > 

*gf J SUNDAY 

International II SCHOOL 

:- LESSON:* 

By HAROLD L. LUNDQUIST. D. D. 
Of The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago. 
Released by Western Newspaper Union. 




Lesson for February 13 



Lesson subjects snd Scripture texts se- 
lected and copyrighted by International 
Council of Religious Education; used by 
permission. 



CLASSIFIED 

DEPARTMENT 



by OR. JAMES W. BARTON 



Released by Western Newspaper Union. 

ALCOHOLISM 



HELP WANTED 



JESUS ON THE MOUNTAIN 
AND IN THE VALLEY 

LESSON TEXT-Mark i:J-8. 17-17. 
GOLDEN TEXT-I believe: help thou 
•nine unbelief.— Mark 8:14. ^ 






get that job done^by tomorrow night 

Thought of sry much lost time put 
its irritation in him. He knew a 
better way. 

He sat up and gathered his reins 
to go and turned for a last look at 
the spring where he had hoped a 
man would be camping. Old Willy 
Nickle was crouched there beside 
the water, smoking -his black clay 
pipe. 

"Lord, Willy," he said, "you do 
make my scalp itch! Did you hap- 
pen to be an Apache I'd have an 
arrow in my hump ribs by now!" 

"So you would." Willy nodded. 

"How long have you been here? 
Saw no sign of your camp." 

The old man stood up and stuffed 
his pipe into the deep pocket of his 
deer-hide coat. "Last night," he 
said. "You don't never leave your 
camp sign, boy," he advised grave- 
ly. "Bury your fire and sleep away 
somewheres from the water. Well, 
that's just talk though!" He leaned 
on the slender barrel of bis needle 
gun and stared down into the valley. 
"Seems like the Cross Ti been 
slowed up some. That herd there 
past town is the Indian Supply out- 
fit, so I think, hitting the trail ahead 
of Tom Arnold. That's been their 
caper." ' 

"They've thrown trouble aplenty 
into the Cross T*s start," Lew 
agreed, "so I'm told." He looked 
down into the old fellow's dark, gen- 
tle face and brought out the thing 
he wanted to know. 

He gave his details clearly. "If a 
man leading the Cross T was to 
swing west and keep off the trail he'd 
save time and even pass the Indian 
Supply outfit maybe. There's a 
shorter route. They tell me that 
Colonel McKitrick led a scouting 
army up the Staked Plain once and 
marked the way with rock piles. 
There's buffalo grass enough this 
year. But it's a question of water. 
No man hereabouts could say, I 
guess." 

"Well, he could!" old Willy stated. 
"It'd be a dry drive first day to a 
tank, with nothing to go by. Then 
there'll be those rock piles plain as 
a man's nose. He could make it a 
hundred miles, north to the White 
Salt Fork. A double butte is bis 
landmark there. He goes east from 
that" 

"There'll be water on the Staked 
Plain then, sure?" 

"If a man knows how the Apaches 
got it in them dry cienegas." 

Lew grinned. "He does." This 
was satisfying information, and he 
made a vital decision in that mo- 
ment "It'll be the rock-pile route 
for the Cross T when I take it over. 
Without things happening 'We'll start 
in another day." 

Willy nodded and crouched again 
beside the water; and so, having 
planted that knowledge in bis brain. 
Lew left him. like a brown Old eagle 
perched high on the ledge of rock. 

He rode down toward the brand- 
ing fires in the valley's mouth. Out 
on the flat ground, a big, pot-bel- 
lied mossyhorn broke suddenly from 
two men who had cut him from the 
herd. With his rope swinging he 
turned him and was up close to the 
two riders when he recognized Clay 
and Ed Splann. 

(TO BE CONTINUED! 



The vision of the mountain top 
prepares the believer for service 
down in the valley. "Where there is 
no vision the people perish," said the 
wise man of old (Prov. 39:18). For 
want of a true vision of God, a 
knowledge of His truth, and the God- 
given constraint which makes men 
give themselves in sacrificial serv- 
ice, the people will perish in their 
sins. 

But let men coma to know the 
truth as it is in Christ learn to know 
Him as .the Son of God glorious 
and powerful and then let them 
translate their knowledge of Chris- 
tian truth and their personal spiritu- 
al experiences into the dally minis- 
try to the needs of their fellow men, 
and there will be songs of salvation 
and joy. 

I. Knowing (vv. 2-7). 
The transfiguration of Christ 

doubtless meant much to Him in 
preparation for His coming death 
and resurrection. It was a fore- 
gleam of His kingdom glory. 

In this lesson we are concerned 
with the experience of the disciples 
rather than the feelings of our Lord. 
Fundamental in both Christian life 
and service is a clear understanding 
of the person and work of Christ 
One may come to Christ knowing 
little more than that He Is the di- 
vine Saviour, and one may enter 
into Christian living with a meager 
knowledge of the doctrines of the 
Bible. But the Christian who fails to 
grow in knowledge will not grow in 
grace as he should. 

God sets no premium on Igno- 
rance, in fact it is quite evident that 
the great blight on the Christian 
church today is the appalling lack 
of understanding ol God's Word. 

The disciples came to a fuller con- 
viction that He was the Son of God 
as they saw Him transfigured and 
heard the Father say, "This is my 
beloved Son." They learned more 
plainly the truth of His coming death 
for the sins of all mankind. They 
saw in the indescribable beauty of 
that moment the foregleam of His 
coming glory. What important truths 
these are— His deity— His redemp- 
tion—His coming kingship. Do we 
have a clear grasp of these truths? 
If not let us search the Scriptures. 

II. Growing (v. 8). 

"Jesus only." He filled their 
vision and their hearts. They had 
made spiritual progress as they had 
seen His glory and heard the com- 
mending voice of the Father. 

Great experiences of spiritual re- 
newing and power are necessary to 
effective life and testimony. They 
may not be in outward manifesta- 
tion, in feet they are more often in 
the inner recesses of the soul; but 
they transform men and send them 
forth to magnificent living tor God. 
One wonders if much of the dearth 
of power in the Christian church is 
not to be attributed directly to the 
lack of such experiences with God. 

The disciples had an unforgettable 
mountain top experience. Even so 
have many others found the secret 
of power. 

Let us remember that such privi- 
leges are not reserved for a few, 
they are the birthright of every 
Christian. Power without knowledge 
is a dangerous and destructive thing, 
but knowledge without power is a 
dead thing. 

Let us study God's Word, but let 
the truth be baptized in the over- 
flowing spiritual power of a personal 
experience with God. 

In regeneration all that Christ is 
and has for us is made available. 
If we have not taken out our inheri- 
tance let us do it at once. 

m. Serving (w. 17-27). 

One of the lessons that seems hard 
to learn and to keep constantly ef- 
fective in the life of a Christian Is 
that mount a in top experiences of 
spiritual uplift are not an end in 
themselves, but a preparation tor 
service. All too often we come to 
regard such times of peculiar bless- 
ing, whether in the privacy of our 
own room or in the great confer- 
ence of Christian workers, as some- 
thing which should glow warmly in 
our own hearts, making us glad in 
the Lord, and not as a preparation 
for ministry to others. 

Jesus and the disciples went up 
to the place of prayer, into the place 
of glory, and down to the place of 
service. How fitting is that se- 
quence. 

Much confusion exists in the 
church because those who have fool- 
ishly abandoned God's Word and 
substituted the energy of the flesh 
tor spiritual power have been most 
diligent in service to humanity; 
while those who know and accept 
the truth about Christ and who pro- 
fess to believe in the power of the 
Spirit-filled life, have failed to serve 
their needy neighbors. 

"But Jesus took him by the hand 
and lifted him up" (v. 27). Verses 
28 and 29 indicate that the disciples 
might have done the same by be- 
lieving prayer 



Dr. Barton 



Until very recently, to have a 
member of the family treated for a 
mental ailment — Illusions, obses- 
sions, hallucinations or other form 
of odd behavior — 
caused sorrow and 
shame. Today these 
mental ailments are 
considered on the 
same basis as phys- 
ical ailments. The 
family Is willing to 
have the patient en- 
ter a medical clinic 
or mental institution 
to receive treatment 
Physicians now 
consider alcoholism 
a disease rather than 
just a bad or unfortunate habit The 
family and the patient eagerly 
stretch out for the help or cure now 
available. In many cases the will 
to stop drinking, strong as it may 
btv ls\not sufficient to remove or 
overcome) the desire for alcohol. 

In the New England Journal of 
Medicine, Dr. Joseph Thimann, Bos- 
ton, states: 

"No other disease is so widely 
spread or so detrimental from the 
medical, sociologic, legal, economic 
or any other point of view as Is 
chronic alcoholism. The experience 
that will power and good Intentions 
on the part of the unfortunate pa- 
tient are in most cases inefficient 
led physicians to look for another 
cure." 

The idea behind drug treatment of 
alcoholism came from the knowl- 
edge that if we eat a food that dis- 
agrees with us or a tainted food that 
causes cramps and other symptoms, 
we will not want that food any more 
or at least suit for a long time. 

Thus by treating the alcoholic pa- 
tient with an emetic a desire to vom- 
it occurs when the patient drinks 
alcohol. The emetic used is emetine, 
derived from ipecac. 

Dr. Thimann refers to the work of 
Drs. Voegtlin and Lemere who have 
used this treatment for six years. 
They use a solution of 50 grains of 
emetine, 25 grains of pilocarpine, 23 
grains of ephedrine and 40 cc. of wa- 
ter, .04 to 1.0 cc. of which is inject- 
ed into a muscle 4 to 12 minutes be- 
fore a drink of alcohol is given to 
the patient. The treatments are giv- 
en four to seven times on successive 
days and repeated once after one, 
two, three, six, nine and twelve 
months during the first year. 

There were 1,194 patients treated 
by this method. About 75 per cent of 
644 patients treated for less than two 
years were still abstainers; about 62 
per cent of 291 patients treated from 
two to four years and 51 per cent 
of 259 patients treated four or more 
years were still abstainers. 

It is gratifying to know that the 
results of the treatment of alcohol- 
ism is now successful in such a 

large percentage of cases, 
see 

Stomach Ailments 
Easily Diagnosed 



Before the discovery of the X-ray, 
it was difficult for the physician to 
tell whether or not the symptoms 
were due to ulcer, cancer, or gas- 
tritis—inflammation of the lining of 
the stomach. By means of test 
meals, the presence of large or 
small amounts or even absence of 
hydrochloric acid in the stomach 
contents, he was often able to tell 
just which condition was present If 
he was in doubt often the abdomen 
was opened and stomach lining ex 
amined. This .is called an "explora- 
tory" operation as it is an attempt 
to explore or find what is wrong. 

However, when the X-ray was dis- 
covered and it was possible to see 
whether the lining of the stomach 
was smooth or had slight depressions 
or other deformities, the presence 
of ulcer or of cancer could be told 
in most cases. When the physician 
and surgeon were in doubt an ex- 
ploratory operation was made but 
this was not necessary very often. 

However, while the use of the 
X-ray in locating ulcer and cancer 
was a great step forward it was 
found that in a few cases, when the 
X-ray pointed to cancer and the 
exploratory operation was per- 
formed, no cancer was found. And 
in some cases also where X-ray ap- 
parently showed no cancer present 
the patient really had cancer and 
this was sometimes discovered too 
late to save his life. 

Fortunately, the new instrument 
the gastroscope, which enables the 
physician to "see" the lining of the 
stomach, is now enabling physicians 
to advise operation when needed and 
there is no fatal delay. 

By using X-rays and the gastro- 
scope, stomach patients now have 
double protection against ulcer and 
cancer. 

see 

QUESTION BOX 

Q.— What causes dizzy spells and 
weakness? 

A. — Dissy spells may be doe to 
ear, liver, or blood pressure disturb- 
ances. 

e e e 

Q. — What causes sores in the 
mouth? 

A.— There are several causes el 
■ores in the mouth— foods, run-down 
condition, thin blood, infection, etc. 
One visit to a physician may find ike 
cai 



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Boulders as Tombstones 



Because it is forbidden to cut a 
gravestone or write a name or epi- 
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Ton breathe freer al- 
most Instantly as lust 
2 drops Penetro Nose 
Drops open your cold- 
dossed nose to five 



your head cold air. 
Caution: Use only aa 
directed. 25c. 2V4 times 
SB much for 60c. Get 
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Cactus as Compass 

Because the barrel cactus always 

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PAZOi PILES 

Relieves pain and soreness 


- 


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Weasel a Killer 

The only lower animals that kill 
for the love of killing are weasels. 



How To Relieve 
Bronchitis 

Creomulslon relieves promptly be- 
cause it goes right to the seat of the 
trouble to help loosen and expel 
germ laden phlegm, and aid nature 
to soothe and heal raw, tender, in- 
flamed bronchial mucous mem- 
branes. Tell your druggist to sell you 
a bottle of Creomulslon with the un- 
derstanding you must like the way it 
quickly allays the cough or you an 
to have your money back. 

CREOMULSION 

for Coughs, Chest Colds, Bronchitis 



f To relieve distress of MONTHLY "^ 

Female Weakness 

Lydla E. Plnkham'a Vegetable Com- 
pound la made especially for women 
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weak, tired, nervous, blue feelings 
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Taken regularly— Plnkham's Com- 
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NOSE MUST DRAIN 

To Relieve Head Cold Aiiseries 
When head colds strike, help nose ' 
drain.clearthewayforfreerbreathing ' 
comfort with KOanrS IASAL JOLT. At JrmtgUu 




WNU— E 



6—44 



ThatNac^in*? 
Backache 



May Warn of D is ordere d 
Kidney Action 

Modem life with its harry and worry: 
Irregular habits, Improper eating and 
drinking — its risk of exposure and lnfee- 
tion— throws heavy strain on the work 
of the kidney*. They are apt to become 
over-taxed and fail to filter excess add 
add other Imparities from the lile-gtring 
blood. 

Ton may suffer nagging backache, 
hsadachs, dlxxlness, getting op night*. 
leg pains, swelling— feel constantly 
tired, nervous, all worn out. Other signs 
of kidney or bladder disorder are some- 
times burning, scanty or too (requeaS 
sjrinattftw. 

Try Dooa'. Pitt*. DoeV* help the 
kidney* to pass off barmf ol exeees body 
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century of public approval. Are 
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DOANS PILLS 




Ml 



m 



Thursday, February 10, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 




HOUSEHOLD 

ill f In OS**, lu*£m, 




Let Hearts Be Gay on Valentine's Day! 

(See Recipes Below) 




Cupid's Share 

Hold on to your heart! Here comes 
Cupid ready to do tricks to your 
heart on Valentine's Day! It's time 
for a party with cute Dan Cupid 
reigning on a mighty throne. 

February's a short, short month 
but with plenty of opportunity for 
party-giving. You 
can have a Lin- 
coln's or Wash- 
ington's birthday 
party, or you can 
be extra gay and 
colorful with a 
Valentine's par- 
ty. These should 
be extra popular 
this year with the 
pepped - up pace 
of romance. If anyone in your crowd 
it about ready for a shower or wed- 
ding you might take the cue from 
Valentine's day and make Cupid's 
decorations your theme. 

Pink-and- white or " red-and- white 
are the gay color schemes and you 
can carry these out in both food and 
decorations. A simple but dramatic 
table picture is seen in the picture 
In today's column. Three large, red 
valentine boxes are set on their side 
In a row to form the main interest 
for the table. If you want to enlarge 
on this, get other pink-and-white or 
red-and-white decorations such as 
nosegays of roses and tie with a 
■wirl of ribbon. 

If you would rather carry this out 
in flowers, get a nice centerpiece of 
red-and-white flowers. But have a 
heart, somewhere along the way. 
If you have a valentine mold make 
a valentine cake or jelly mold and 
work out an arrow with a pastry 
tube or, if the cake is iced you 
might even put on an arrow made 
out of red paper. 

Here is a luscious salad that takes 
it easy on rationed foods: 
'Molded Raw Cranberry Salad. 

(Serves 6 to 8) 
t caps raw cranberries, ground 
1 envelope orange gelatine 
1 cap chopped celery 
H cap chopped nuts 

1 cop granulated sugar 

2 cups water 
Juice of 1 lemon 
Pour % cup water in a bowl. Add 

gelatine to water. Add 1% cups 
water and sugar 



Lynn Chambers' Point-Saving 
Valentine Party Menn 

•Molded Raw Cranberry Salad 

•Heart-Shaped Chicken 

Sandwiches 

Beverage 

. Strawberry-Rhubarb Tarts 

•Recipes Given . 




and stir until dis- 
solved. Add lem- 
on juice. Set aside 
to cool. Grind 
raw cranberries, 
chop nuts and 
celery fine. Add 
these ingredients 
to gelatine. Place salad in one large 




Lynn Says 

Play Gaines, Too! Nothing's 
nicer than having fortunes told 
at a Valentine party. If you 
can't afford a professional, have 
someone dressed as a gypsy, arm 
her with a heavy glass crystal 
and booth, and let her go to town. 

Letter games are fine for start- 
ing off a party. Give each guest 
a letter to tie around his neck as 
he enters, and as others appear, 
let each one dash around to oth- 
ers to make up words. When 
words are formed, guests appear 
in front of a person who takes 
down their names. Prize goes to 
person appearing in most words. 
Novel idea for a scavenger hunt 
which needn't take you outdoors. 
Select about 10 guests and make 
them have something unusual 
For example, have a man with 
two unmatched socks, a girl with 
two different colored hair bows, 
someone who wears his watch on 
the left arm, a girl with two dif- 
ferent colored earrings, etc. Ev- 
eryone is provided with a list of 
above so he knows what to look 
for. As he finds the person, he 
writes down the name. The one 
finished first gets the prize. 
Save Used Fats 



or several individual molds and let 
jell until firm. Serve with lettuce or 
greens. 

These clever ham roll-ups add a 
colorful and festive note to your 
menu. They're simple to make If 
you just follow directions: 
Ham Roll-Dps. 
(Makes 4 Roll-ups) 
t tablespoons fat 
2!» tablespoons flour 
% teaspoon salt 
Pepper 
1 cup milk 

V*. cup grated American cheese 
4 sUces leftover boiled or baked 

ham, sliced thin 
8 asparagus tips 

Blend fat, flour and seasonings. 
Gradually add the milk. Stir until 
thick and smooth. Add cheese and 
stir until it has melted. Cut ham in 
thin slices 4x6 inches. Roll two 
asparagus tips In each slice. Se- 
cure with toothpick, place in a shal- 
low pan and surround with cheese 
sauce. Sprinkle with paprika. Bake 
in a moderate oven (350 degrees) 
15 minutes. Insert sprigs of parsley 
at end of each ham roll. Serve at 
once. 

Get out your heart-shaped cutter 
if you want to make sandwiches. 
For a simple 
children's supper 
party or for val- 
entine refresh- 
ments for grown- 
ups, serve heart 
shaped sand- 
wiches filled with 
chicken salad and 
garnish the plat- 
ter with buttered beets cut in heart 
shapes. Strawberry and vanilla ice 
cream with little sugar cookies— a 
tiny motto candy heart placed In 
the center of each cookie—is effec- 
tive. 

This chicken sandwich spread 
may be prepared the day before it 
is used to fit in the Siry's schedule: 
•Chicken Sandwich Spread. 
4 cups finely minced chicken 
1 can pimientos, finely minced 
H cup pickle relish 
34 cnp grated onion, if desired 
Salt and pepper to taste 
Mayonnaise to moisten 
Thoroughly mix all ingredients 
and store in refrigerator until ready 
to use. 

Cherries can make food decora- 
tive for any Valentine party wheth- 
er they are used In cake or pie: 
Champion Cherry Pie. 
Crust: 
1% cops bread floor 
10 tablespoons lard 
1 teaspoon salt 
5 to 6 tablespoons Ice water 
Sift flour and salt together, add 
lard 'and blend. Add ice water grad- 
ually and cool. 
Filling: 
VA cops pitted soar cherries, 

drained 
H cup cherry Juice 
VA tablespoons fine tapioca 
H teaspoon salt 
1 cnp sugar 
1 teaspoon batter 
Soak tapioca, sugar and salt in 
cherry juice and let stand while pas- 
try Is being made. Then mix well 
with cherries, add butter and put in 
pie tin. Bake pie for 10 minutes 
at 490 degrees, then reduce tem- 
perature to moderate or 350 degrees 
and bake for 20 minutes. Turn 
off oven and let stand at oven tem- 
perature for 20 minutes before re- 
moving from oven. 

// you want sugar-saving suggestions, 
write to Lynn Chambers, Western News- 
paper Union, 210 South Desplaines 
Street, Chicago 6, Illinois. Don't for- 
get to enclose a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope for your reply. 

Released by Western Newspaper Union. 




Watch your electric cords for 
wear. Have them repaired at once 
to prevent accidents. 

• • • 
Continual opening of the oven 

door changes the temperature and 
is a common cause of baking fail- 
ures. 

• • • m 

Chicken fat saved from stewed 
chicken may be substituted for 
shortening in? pie crusts, biscuits, 
spiced or ginger cookies or cake. 

• • • 

■ A sharp knife, rinsed in hot 
water, will do a good job of cutting 
cake and keeping neat cake and 
frosting edges. 

• • • 

If a small leak makes it impos- 
sible to use the hot water bottle in 
the regular way, try filling it with 
hot salt. You'll find it holds the 
heat even longer than water and 
will last a long time. 



e-< v -P-C—C*-f*-CV-0-C-.p— f^(WfWf*-cW<V.(V.{Wj 



ASK ME *) 

\ ANOTHER I 

f A General Quiz 



1916 

32-46 

Scalloped Front. 

A NSWER the doorbell, visit your 
x * neighbor and whirl through 
your housework comfortably in 
this dress! There's nothing about 
it to make it too fancy for the 
busiest home keeper, yet it is far 
from hum-drum! 



Barbara Bell Pattern No. 19IB is de- 
signed for sizes 32, 34, 36. 38, 40. 42, 44 
and 46. Size 34. short sleeves, requires 4% 
yards 35-inch material, 2>,4 yards rlcrac. 



UncUPhllC 




1890 

12-40 



Hip-Concealing. 

r\ESIGNED for those who would 
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but who need a little extra fullness 
in the jacket to conceal a too-full 
hip line! 

• • • 

Barbara Bell Pattern No. 1890 is In sizes 
12, 14, 18, 18, 20 and 40. Size 14, short 
sleeves, requires 3% yards 39-inch materi- 
al, % yard contrast. 

Due to an unusually large demand and 
current war conditions, slightly more time 
is required In filling orders for a few of 
the most popular pattern numbers. 

Send your order to: 



The Questions 

1. To what part of the world is 
the" soybean native? 

2. What is the meaning of glyp- 
tography? 

3. What state in the United States 
is divided into parishes instead of 
counties? 

4. What is the name of the re- 
ligious cross most familiar to us? 

5. Rubicund means what? 

6. What is the most western 
province of Canada? 

7. Where was Eamon de Valera, 
prime minister of Eire, born? ' 

8. How large is the world's big- 
gest plow? 



SEWING CIRCLE PATTERN DEPT. 
530 South Wells St. Chicago 

Enclose 20 cents in coins for each 
pattern desired. 
Pattern No size 

Name 

Address * 



G(f5: 

Some men are even too indolent 
to pull wires to advance. 

It's all right to change one's mind, 
out it is also possible to be wrong on 
the second thought. 

A soft answer may turn away 
wrath, but that's hard to do when 
you have a club in your hand. 

A straw vote gives about the 
same cheer as viewing the new 
moon over one's right shoulder 
does. 

The man who dies a millionaire 
leaves much to be desired. 

About the time a business girl 
becomes indispensable she up and 
marries. 

"Ignorance," said Rastus, "ain't 
knowin' nothin'— it's knowin' too 
much that ain't so." 



The Answers 

1. Southeastern Asia. 

2. The art of engraving on gems. 

3. Louisiana. 

4. The Latin cross. 

5. Inclined to redness. 

6. British Columbia. 

7. New York, ir*;1882. 

8. The world's largest plow, de- 
veloped for reworking California 
farmlands, cuts a furrow six feet 
deep and is higher than a man, 
weighs 15,000 pounds and requires 
the pulling power of three large 
tractors. 




END CONSTIPATION 
THIS NATURAL WAY! 

Millions now take Simple 
Fresh Fruit Drink instead 
i " of Harsh Laxatives I 

ft 

It's lemon and water. Yes t — just 
the juice of 1 Sunkist Lemon in a 
glass of water — first thing on 
arising. 

Taken first thing in the morning, 
this wholesome drink stimulates 
bowel action in a natural way — 
assures most people of prompt, 
normal elimination. 

Why not change to this healthful 
habit? Lemon and water is good 
for you. Lemons are among the 
richest sources of vitamin C, which 
combats fatigue, helps yon resist 
colds and infections. They also 
supply B, and P. They alkalinize, 
aid appetite and digestion. Lemon 
and water has a fresh tang, too— ■ 
clears the. mouth, wakes you up! 

Try this grand wake-up drink 
10 mornings. See if it doesn't help 
you ! Use California Sunkist 
Lemons. 




Pattern 764S has a transfer pattern of 
embroidery for panel and collar; a single 
dress pattern in sizes 2, 4 or 6. State size 
desired. 

Due to an unusually large demand and 
current war conditions, slightly more time 
is required In filling orders for a few of 
the most popular pattern numbers. 

Send your order to: 



Sewing Circle Nc 
564 W. Randolph St. 

Enclose 15 cents 
cover cost of maL 

No 


edlecraft Dept. 
Chicago 80, 111. 

(plus one cent to 
ling) for Pattern 






Address . 
















Ought to Do 

"Colonel (inspecting barracks) — 
Suppose the barracks caught fire, 
what order would you give? 
Sergeant— Cease fire! 



"MOSEGAYSv of roses, embroid- 
• L ^ 1 ered down the front of this 
pert princess frock, will make 
that youngster proud to wear it. 
The transfer pattern for the em- 
broidery comes with the smart 
little dress pattern. 



Upper Crust 

Brown — So you're setting your col- 
lege graduate son up in the bakery 
business? 

Blue — Yes, he's so keen for dough and 
such a swell loafer it looks as if he 
would rise I I 



A flirt is a woman who believes 
that it's every man for herself. 



Fair Question 



German to the Swiss — How come 
you have an admiral? You have 
no coastline, no navy, no empire. 

The Swiss replied — Well, you in 
Germany have a minister of jus- 
tice, don't you? 



Rayon fabrics must be handled 
carefully when wet.' When dry, 
rayon regains its strength. 



Honey should be kept in a warm 
place in the kitchen, If it, does 
granulate, place the container in a 
pan of hot water until it liquidizes. 

• * • 

Mix plaster of paris with vinegar 
instead of water and it will not 
harden so quickly when you are 
filling in cracks and holes in plas- 
ter-. 

• • • 

Why not a spice bag to flavor 
that soup or stew? To maka one, 
mix three sprigs parsley, six whole 
cloves, one bay leaf and a little 
thyme and tie them loosely in^ 
small square of white cheeseclothT 
Drop the bag into the cooking mix- 
ture. 



GRANDMA KNEW 

SrtS'.'KSr. lABOUTCOUS 

cated at home to relieve odd-coughing, 
muscle aches. Smart mothers today sim- 
ply rub on Penetro. Modern medication 
in base containing old reliable mutton 
suet. Relieves auoh colds' distress. 26a. 
Double supply 35c. Today; get Penetro. 



Seat of Russ Government 

Moscow's Kremlin, seat of th»> 
government, is a tract of 100 acres, 
surrounded by a wall with 19 tow- 
ers and pierced by five main gate*. 



TABASCO 

The snappiest seasoning known, and 
the world's most widely distributed 
food product! A dash of this piquant 
sauce give* a rare flavor to any food. 
TABASCO— the seasoning secret of 
master chef a for more than 75 years! 



At Last 

At Miami, Fla., a tombstona 
bears the name of Happiness Com- 
plete. . ' 




CLABBER GIRL 



100 BAD 

We can't make enough Smith Bros. Cough 
Dropj to satisfy everybody, because our out- 
put is war-reduced— so please buy only as 
many as you really need. Through three gen- 
erations and five wars. Smith Bros. Cough 
Drops have given soothing relief from 
coughs due to colds. Still only M. 

.SMITH BROS. .COUGH DROPS 

SLACK OR MENTHOL— 5* 






MUSCLE PAINS can do it to yon 
—make yon feel old— look drawn 
and haggard, soretone Liniment 
contains methyl salicylate, a most 
effective pain-relieving agent. And 
Soretone's cold heat action brings 
yon fast, so-o-o-thing relief. 

1. Quickly Soretone acts to en- 
hance local circulation, 

2. Check muscular cramps, 

3. Help reduce local swelling. 

4. Dilate surface capillary blood 
vessels. 

For fastest action, let dry, rub in 
again. There's only one Soret one- 
insist on it for Soretone results. 
50c Big bottle, only $1. 



MONEY BACK- 

IF SORETONE DOESN'T SATISFY 



"and McKesson makes it** 



SORETONE 

soothes fast with 

COLD HEAT* 
ACTION 



in cases of • 

MUSCULAR LUMBAGO 
OR BACKACHE 

in* to tatlsas sr usoiurs 

MUSCULAR PAINS 

diwtossMs 

SORE MUSCLES 
MINOR SPRAINS 



1— -I *Thou»h snpllod cold, nibs- 



fsetont tnindlsats In Sors- 
tons set Ills but to lnerotM 
Um raperflclsl lupplj «f 



blood to lbs ires sod Indue* 
s sknrlnt mom of wsnrta. 



MUST BE MY FIFTH 
WHEAT ROLL! THEyfeEj 
JUST TOO GOOD TO 
PASS UP! I'M G0IN6 
TO WRITE MOM ABOUT 
THESE, COUSIN 8EA 
^ 



DO. JIM! IMIDY WHiAT POLLS, 
THEY'RE CALLED. AND RIGHTLY SO! 
IT'S A NEW, EASY RECIPE. ANO SHEU 
BE INTERESTED TO KNOW THESE 
ROLLS KM KTRA VITAMINS. 



'/. 



'^\ 




ALL THESE VITAMINS IN FLErSCMMANN* 
YEAST GO RIGHT INTO WHATEVER YOU 
BAKE WITH NO GREAT LOSS IN THE 

OVEN! ANO SEE... I BUY A WEEK'S 
SUPPLY AT A TIME. FLEISCHMANN'S YEAST 
WILL KEEP PERFECTLY IN THE 
REFRIGERATOR 



AND COUSIN BEA SAYS YOU CAN SEND 
FOR A COPY OP THE NEW, REVISED 

FLEISCHMANN*8 VEAST RECIPE BOOK, 
YOURSELF. ITS FREE... ANO FULL 

OF SWELL RECIPES, INCLUDING SOME 
NEW WARTIME SPECIALS. BUT, 




^X2Jb* HURRY, MOM 



",*. 



»»<r— o»»T»ISj»no»40-— »n,in|.i •.iiiHinln.ot 
70 Mrt s u tor s ra sfc fats. Si Mirt Woo*, wr». to Stanford 
tissual. OrasdCssl r sI liwis , lss4wCHowTori I7.M.T. 

-A4 




I 



B 



I 



WALTON ADVERTISES 



THURSDAY, FEB. 10th, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 

(Established in 1914) 

THE KENTON-CAMPBELL COURIER — Established 1M7 

(Consolidated June 1, 1938) 



Entered as Second Class Matter January 1, 1916 
1 at the Post Office at Walton, Kentucky. 



MRS. J. R. WALLACE and WILLIAM W. JARRELL 
EDITORS and PUBLISHERS 



Foreign Advertising Representative: 

AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 



NATIONAL* DITOmAL_ 
SSOCIATIQN 



I 




Notices and Cards of Thanks: 
15 words and less, 50 cents. Over 
15 words $1.00. 



EKTOCKY PRES! 

'ASSOCIATION, 
irrnnu mtvnrf*t$ 




AS ONE SERVICE MAN TO ANOTHER 



Of course, I don't get my 
pay check from Uncle Sam, 
bat I sore am a "service" 
man when it comes to 
workin' in close, cooperation 
with the armed forces. 
Seems like most of the 
army, navy and marine 



corps ride my bus 
or later. 

But you're welcome, even 
if we are crowded to the 
gunnels, as the sailor said. 
When I'm haulin' you guys 
in uniform. I feel like I'm 
doing my bit for the country. 



BiU-tUUtdtitm* 



SOUTH EASTERN 

1 GREYHOUND 



STEPHENSON MILL 
ROAD 



Miss Noah Day is visiting her 
brother, Mr. and Mrs. Hubert R. 
Day of Walto'ttf 

Mr. and Mrs. Levi Pennington, 
Lucy and Jimmie, and Mrs. 
Ralph Marsh and family were 
Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Earnest Gadd, all of Walton. 

TIr. and Mrs. Mathew Flynn 
and family of Walton spent Mon- 
day with Mrs. Flynn's parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Roberts of Pal- 
mouth. . 

Mr. Owen Stephenson and 
Leon Pennington of Walton left 
Friday morning for Burning 
Springs, Kentucky to visit friends 
and relatives of Leon. An enjoy- 
able time was reported by both. 

Mrs. Marice Dixon and daugh- 
ter of Louisville were week-end 
guests of her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. George McLone of Walton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Penn- 
ington of Alexanderia were Sun*- 
day uests of Mr. and Mrs. Nick 
Trapp and family of Walton. 

Mr. Leon Pennington of Wal- 
ton spent Tuesday, and Wednesday 
visiting his cousin in Covington. 

VERONA 



Unusually mild weather for this 
time of year prevailes in this com 
munity. ' 

Mrs. Mattie Whitson who in- 
jured her hip last fall is able to 
be up and around her home. At 
present she is staying with her 
daughter, Mrs. Rose Hamilton. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Boyer spent 
from Thursday until Friday in 
Louisville. . 

Mrs. Tevis Thomas and daugh- 
ter* spent Wednesday, February 
2nd in the W. E. Waller home. It 
was her birthday. - . 

We are sorry to report that 
Mrs. C. C. Kannady is not so well 
at this writing. 

The Happy Twelve Club jour- 
neyed to Mrs. Walter Pennington's 
on Richwood grade for their Feb. 
meeting. Although all members 
were not able to get there the day 
was very enjoyable, especially the 
steak dinner and the members 
were grateful to Mr. Walter 'King 
for taking them. 



This is Your "Battle Flag" 

HERE AT HOME 




trr 



WE BOUGHT EXTRA WAR RONDS 



Bv«ry patriotic American will 
want to diaplay this emblem 
at home — on hit Iront door or 
in hii window. It i« the red, 
whit* and blue nicker that 
aaya you have done your part 
in the 4th War Loan. 





Display your colors now! 



I rvuRiNO this 4th War Loan Drive you are 

1** again asked to do something extra to help 

. smash the Axis. Your part is to invest in at 

tost one extra hundred dollar Bond. But 

"^on't stop there if you can do more. For re* 

lember — no matter how many Bonds you 

>uy— no matter what denominations they are 

[ *— you get back on maturity $4 for every $3 

irou invest. And that's on the word of Uncle 



Sam, creator of the safest investment the 
world has ever known. 

So before you look into your wallet — LOOK 
into your heart. Your company, the place 
where you work, has been given a quota to 
meet in this 4th War Loan Drive. Do your 
part to help meet this quota. And remember, 
millions of America's fighters are waiting 
for your answer, your pledge that you are 
backing them to the limit. 



^W# BACK THE ATTACK! 

tW» U an official U. S. Treaaury •dVartieement— prepared under the ampicea ol Traaaury Department and War Advertiainf Council, a 



-_ -Sponsored By -. 

The Carrollton Tobacco 
Warehouse Co. 



Carrollton 



Kentucky 



Mr. and Mr*. John C. Kannady 
have had letters recently from Joe 
and Ben and both report they are 
well. 

Mrs. W. E. Waller and sons 
were in Covington Saturday 
shopping. They spent Saturday 
nite and Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Louise Margalin and sons of 
Cincinnati. They accompanied 
the Waller's home Sunday p. m. 
and visited Mrs. Margalin's par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. John C. 
Kannady. 

Mrs. Lorena Myers and son and 
MTs. Walter King and daughter 
were shopping in Covington Sat- 
urday. 

Mr. Charles Stith had charge of 
the services at the Baptist Church 
here on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Massle spent 
Monday with Mr. and Mrs. John 
Kannady. 



grand children and Pete Chapman 
all spent Sunday at Bert Kan-i 
nady's, they called oh Mr. and 
Mrs. Qeo. Lucas of Walton in their 
new home. 

The Y. W. A's^ and Sunbeams 
met at the church Saturday after- 
noon, the meetings were enoyed 
by all present. 

Mr. D. R. Chapman and grand 
son were business visitors of 
Williamstown Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Bingham 
and son Donald spent Sunday at 
Ross Chapman's after attending 
church at Mt. Zion. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Robinson 
were business visitors of Coving 
ton Monday. 

Preaching at Concord Sunday 
and Sunday night. B. T. U. Social 
at Hobert Speagles Saturday nite. 



SUGAR CREEK 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Breeden of 
Covington spent Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. R. H. Story. ■■ 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren Taylor 
called on Mr. and Mrs. John 
Clifton Sunday evening. 

Thomas Hood of Warsaw spent 
Sunday with Miss Myrtle Edwards 
who is ill. 

Mrs. Scottie McCormick of 
Folsom, Ky. is here visiting re- 
latives. 

Mrs. Orover Clifton and son, 
David called on Mr. and Mrs. 
John Clifton Saturday night. 

Mrs. Dora Spencer of Cincin- 
nati, Ohio spent the week-end 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Albert Noel. 

Cpl. Charles H. Miskell of 
Lacarne, Ohio called on his grand 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Clif- 
ton Sunday. 

Misses Fayetta and Alma Lee 
Miskell, Mrs. Helen Shelton, Miss 
Ruby Caldweir of Glencoe, Ber- 
nard Griffin of Napoleon, and 
Clyde Ellis called on Robert Clif- 
ton and sisters Wednesday night. 



INDEPENDENCE R. R. 1 



Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Summey 
celebrated their 40th Wedding 
Anniversary Sunday at the home 
of her sister, Mrs. Wm. House of 
McKin Drive. Those present to 
enjoy this happy occassion were: 
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Stone, Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Losey and sons J. B. 
and Ronald, Mr. and Mrs. New- 
man Armstrong, Mr. and Mrs. 
Bradford Armstrong and son 
Billy, Mrs. Nancy Spencer, Mr. 
and Mrs. Goebel Armstrong and 
son Philip, Mrr and Mrs. C. T. 
Pickett and son Eldon, Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Epping, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. C. Reynolds, Mr. and Mrs. Earl 
McKinley and sons, LeRoy and 
Donald, Mrs. F. H. Shanklin and 
son Kenton, Mr. and Mrs. Alton 
House, Roddie House, Mr. Lloyd 
Armstrong, Mrs. Leo Flynn, Mr. 
and Mrs. Bryan Armstrong and 
daughter Wanda. 



CONCORD 



Mr. and Mrs. Herbert King of 
Latonia, Mr. and Mrs. O. J. 
Struve and children of Walton, 
Glen Webster, wife and baby of 
Falmouth and Harry Chapman of 
Verona were visiting at the D. R. 
Chapman's home Sunday, it was 
his birthday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Manford Craft 
and daughter Barbara were Sun- 
day guests at W. N. Robinson's 
after Sunday School. 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Chapman 
went to their son's in Louisville 
Thursday. They brought their 
grand children home with them 
for a visit. 

We are sorry to lose Mr. and 
Mrs. M. O. Jones as neighbors, Mr. 
Vest sold the place they live on. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Kannady, 
Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Chapman and 



RUPTURE 



E. J. MEINHARDI, widely 
known Shield Specialist of 
Chicago, will again be in Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, at the Gibson Hotel, 
for Six Days beginning Saturday, 
Feb. 12th to Thursday, Feb. 17th 
Inclusive, from 1 P. M. to 4 P. M. 
and 6 P. M. to 8 P. M. daily. 

Mr. MEINHARDI says: The 
Meinhardi Shield is a tremendous 
improvement — well known for 
producing immediate results. It 
prevents the Rupture from pro- 
truding in 10 days on the average 
— regardless of size or location of 
Rupture and no matter how hard 
you' work or strain. It has no leg 
straps. (No Surgery or Injection 
Treatments used.) Mr. Meinhardi 
has been coming here for 15 years. 
He has thousands of satisfied 
customers. Ask your neighbors. 

Caution: If neglected— Rupture 
may cause weakness, backache, 
constipation, nervousness, stomach 
pains, etc., or sudden death from 
strangulation. 

Men having large Ruptures 
which have returned after Sur- 
gical Operations or Injection 
Treatments are also invited. When 
all others fail— see MEINHARDI. 
He will be pleased to demonstrate 
to you privately without charge. 
(Only men invited.) White only. 



BEAVER LICK 



Arnie Lykins and family moved 
last week from J. W. Conley's 
farm to that of Mr. Johnson on 
Green Road near Walton. A | 

The New Haven Homemakers 
Club sponsored a bake sale at the 
drug store in Florence, January 
22nd and cleared about $16.00. 

Mrs. S. B. Godbey and Miss 
Anna Belle spent several days re- 
cently with Mrs. Gertrude Souder 
at Covington. Mrs. Souder has left 
for Fort Smith, Arkansas to be 
near her husband who is stationed 
at Camp Chaffee. 

Mrs. Lon Wilson, Mrs. Leslie 
Moore, Mrs. Howard Moore and 
little son visited Mr. and Mrs. 
Everett Wolfe of near Petersburg 
Wednesday. 

Mrs. Henry Story and daughters 
of Covington visited Mr. and Mrs. 
William Wilson of Hill Top Ser- 
vice Station Saturday. 

Mrs. Geo. Baker and sons, G. 
W. and Johnie, and Miss Norma 
Jean Stevenson left for Florida 
last week. They expect to stay 
several weeks. 



GUITARS 

$9.95 up 

USED C MELODY SAX $29.00 



ROY ACUFF, GENE AUTRY, 
BRADLEY KINCAID AND 
OTHER GUITAR, CORD AND 
INSTRUCTION BOOKS. GIB- 
SON AND BLACK DIAMOND 
STRINGS FOR ALL INSTRU- 
MENTS. 

COMPLETE MUSICAL 
WATCH AND CLOCK 

REPAIR 

HANSER JEWELRY & 
MUSIC COMPANY 

515'- Madison Ave. 
Covington, -r- Kentucky 



» -9 



EYE STRAIN 

Are you conscious of a 

strain when you read fine 

print* 

Perhaps you need glasses. 

Consult us today. 

L. J. METZGER 

Optometrist Opttclaa 

131 Madison Avt. 

Osvtagtoa 

Serving Northern Kentucky 
With Comfortable Eyesight 



This community was shocked 
and saddened by the sudden death 
of Mrs. Freda Brown Saturday. 
She leaves many friends here who 
sympathize deeply with the hus- 
band and children in their sad 
loss. 



Rev. Shirley Spahr has resigned 
as pastor of the local Baptist 
Church as he has accepted the 
pastorate of the First Baptist 
Church of Cadiz, Ky. He and his 
v/ife have many friends here who 
regret to see them leave. 



NOTICE 

1 have moved across the street from my old location 

and now open for business in the Taylor 

Building next to Dixie State Bank 

WE HANDLE JERSEY FARM ICE CREAM 
AND ALL KIND OF GROCERIES 



D. V. HILL 



WALTON 



KENTUCKY 



AUCTION 
SALE 



Tuesday, Feb. 15th 

AT 10:00 A. M» 

At the farm of Jesse E. Stith, 5 miles west of 
Williamstown on the Heekin and Cross Roads Pike, 
y 2 mile below Heekin. Having rented the farm, I 
will sell the following described property: 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE 

I Kitchen Cabinet; Edison Victrola; Iron Kettle; 
Laundry Stove; and some other Household Fur- 
niture; I Live-and"Grow Box. 

LIVESTOCK AND FEED 

3 Jersey Milk Cows ; I Registered Holstein Bull ; 3 
Beef Type Cows, one with calf, others to freshen 
soon ; 1 black Horse, good leader, weight 1 400 lbs. ; 

1 White Chester Male Hog; Some Corn in crib; 1 
Stack of Alfalfa Hay; Some Loose Timothy in 
barn; About 5 Tons Baled Clover Hay; About 5 
Tons Baled Soybean Hay. 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

2 McCormick-Deering Mowing Machines; 2 Vul- 
can Hillside Plows; 2 Wagons; 2 Hay Frames; 1 
Box Bed; I Hay Rake, same as new; 1* Disc 
Harrow; 1 Sled; 2 Lay-Off Plows; 2 Double 
Shovel Plows ; 1 Grindstone ; 2 Sets Work Harness, 
Several Horse Collars; 1 series 240 Letz Mill; 1 
32-Inch Saw & Mangle; 1 McCormick-Deering 
Electric Milker with Two Single Units; I Double 
Unit Pail; some 10-Gallon Milk Cans, same as 
new; One 7x75 Ft. Tractor Belt; 1 Set Fence 
Stretchers; 1 McCormick-Deering Cream Separ" 
tor; Forks; Hoes; Shovels and many other articles 
too numerous to mention. 

TERMS— Will be announced on day of sale. 

JESSE STITH, 

OWNER 
A. C. ARNOLD & SON, Auctioneers 







ms 




THURSDAY, FEB. 10th, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



SlltyW— ■ *^W*i « n W|f V — » ^fc < * 

s. 



-una 



SOCIAL *nd 
PERSONAL 



Owt 



>M^w< 



Mr. Owen Stephenson and Mr. 
Leon Pennington spent the week- 
end in Manchester, Ky. visiting 
Leon Pennington, relatives and 
friends. 

Mrs. Cecil Gaines of 8. Main 
St. was calling on Mrs. R. P. De- 
Moisey Tuesday afternoon. 



Mrs. Edward Doss and daugh- 
ter of Lousiania is making her 
sister, Mrs. James Cheesman and 
son, who lives in one of the Nor- 
man Apts. a visit. 

Mrs. Wm. Montgomery of Lat- 
onia was calling on Melva White 
Tuesday morning. 



Nr- 



REMEMBER 
HIM or HER 

WITH A 

VALENTINE 



GIFT 



FROM 



COPPIN'S 



MADISON AT 7th COVINGTON, KY. 



Omer Dudgeon who was oper- 
ated on for appendecitis last week 
At St. Elizabeth Hospital is doing 
nicely, his many friends wish him 
a speedy recovery. 

Mrs. Belle Fisher of Bedinger 
Avenue is in Crittenden with her 
sister, Mrs. John Case who is 
quite ill. 

Seaman 2nd class William M. 
Runion has completed his Boot 
training" at Great Lakes and is 
spending his 15-day leave with 
his grand parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Nich Moore of Verona R. 2 and 
other relatives and friends! His 
brother John Nicholas Runion, A. 
S., is now training at Great Lakes. 
These boys made their home with 
their grand parents before enter- 
ing the U. S. Navy. 

Miss Emma Alexander of Er- 
langer Was a pleasant caller at 
the Adjvertiser Office Thursday. 
She was the guest of Mrs. Cook. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Snyder of 
Burlington spent Sunday with Mr. 
Snyder's sister, Mrs. Cecil Gaines, 
Mr. Gaines and family of South 
Main Street. 

Mrs. Sam J. Hudson spent a 
short time with her husband. 
Seaman Second Class, Sam J. 
Hudson at Great Lakes, HI. re- 
cently. 



Can you use 
A typewriter? 

Can you do clerical work or 
accounting? Have you ever 
worked in a store? Can you 
drive a car? 

The Army needs all kinds of 
skills in the WAC. There's a 
chance for you — to improve a 
skill you already have, or 
learn one you'll find useful all 
your life. 

Today — find out about the 
opportunities that await you 
in the WAC— the important 
job, the interesting life, the 
chance to serve your country 
in a vital way. 

Apply at the nearest U. S. 
Army Recruiting Station 
(your local post office will 
give you the address). Or 
write: The Adjutant General, 
Room 4415, Munitions Build- 
ing, Washington, D. C. 



THIS week America honors the memory 
of the man 'whose genius led to the 
development of an industry that has proven 
so be one of the nation's greatest assets in 
its hoar of greatest periL 

U Edison were alive today he would be 
profoundly thrilled by electricity's contribu- 
tion to America's gigantic war production 
program — by the endless flow of arms made 
possible by America's unchallenged leader- 
ship in the field of power production. 

B«t back*ki 1879 when he perfected the 
incandescent lamp and later in 1882 when 
he gave the world the first practical central 
i electric system, he was not thinking 



of electricity as a producer of materials for 
destruction. He visualized it as a servant of 
mankind that would ease man's labors, make 
goods more plentiful and cheaper, and im- 
prove living standards beyond any previous 
conception in history; . __ 

Edison lived to see his dream come true. 
And when this war is won, electricity will 
continue its interrupted march of progress, 
bringing new comforts and conveniences, 
new benefits to mankind. 

For America, birthplace of the electrical 
industry, has the power to win the war . . . 
and the power to take the lead in building 
toward that better world that is sure to come 
when peace returns. 



COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 



Buy More and More W*r Bomb 




Mrs. Emma p4ynn spent Tues- 
day with her daughter, Mrs. Marie 
Saxton of Erlanger. 

Fox DeMoisey of Lawrenceburg 
spent a short time with his par- 
ents, Rev. and Mrs. R. F. De- 
Moisey Monday. 

Mrs. Pearl R. Johnson left for 
her home in Lexington Wednes- 
day evening, after a short visit 
with Martha R. Wallace. 

Petty Officer, Second Class C. 
W. Osborne and Mrs. Osborne 
left Tuesday for their home in 
Pensacola, Fla., after a pleasant 
visit of 12 days with Mrs. Osbonx's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley 
Bush of North Walton and other 
relatives and friends. 

Among those from Walton who 
attended the basket ball game 
Monday night played at the Uni- 
versity of Ky., between Kentucky 
and Illinois were: Mrs. Aleen 
Conner, Jeanette Grubbs, Walter 
Vest, Charles Holder, Guy Olen 
Carlisle, Miss Georgia Rouse, Mrs. 
J. B. Johnson, Tommy Johnson, 
Jack Hughes, Dr. and Mrs. D. L. 
Maddox and two sons, Dwight and 
Johnnie, Eldon Wayne Rice, Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank DeMoisey and 
Mrs. Lula Ryle. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Powers of 
Charleston, W. Va. and Mr. Clif- 
ford,Pbwers of Gauley Bridge, Va. 
were called here the later part of 
the week on account of tl# death 
of their aunt, Mrs. Nettie Vest. 
Mrs. Harry Powers, was also visit- 
ing her father, Mr. E. L. Mann of 
Crittenden who remains ill at his 
home. 

The sale of the Hopperton 
estate Monday was well attended 
and brought a good price. Mr. 
Reamy Simpson bought the pro- 
perty. He expects to remodel the 
home and move there soon. 

Mr. arid Mrs. J. H. Vest had as 
their guests over the week-end, 
their daughter, Mrs. Mabel Tyree 
and her friend Mrs. Francis 
Rietchie of Pleasant Ridge, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 

Nathan E. Northcutt Jr., Hos- 
pital Apprentice, second-class who 
recently graduated from Hospital 
Corps School at Great Lakes, EL, 
is now stationed with the U. S. 
Naval Hospital Staff at St. Albans, 
Long Island, New York. 

Mrs. Lebus Stephenson spent 
the week-end in Latonia, Ky. 
visiting Mr. and Mrs. Stanley 
Conrad and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren Stephen- 
son left Tuesday night, for Ocean- 
side, Calif, to visit the'ir son, Pvt. 
Donald L. Stephenson who is in 
the U. S. Marine Corps there. 
Donald's wife is in California with 
him and has work in one of the 
large Hardware Stores of that 
city. 

Pvt. Mabel F. Farris spent 
Thursday and Friday of last week 
in Cincinnati, Ohio. 



^— *""\.- %W 




Mrs. Minnie Carpenter of Bur- 
lington is spending a few weeks 
with her sister, Mrs. Cecil Gaines 
and family of South Main St. 

Mrs. C. Scott Chambers and 
Mrs. John Vest were recent dinner 
guests of Mrs. Helen Tomlin of 
Cincinnati. Mrs Lydia Stephens of 
Covington was also a guest. 

Mrs. Helen Tomlin and attract- 
ive daughter Miss Margaret of 
Cincinnati were pleasant callers 
at the Advertiser Office Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Baker and 
Mrs. Howard Feldhaus attended 
the funeral of Mrs. William 
Brown of Beaver, Ky. Tuesday. 

Mrs. Mabel Farris of Walton 
has passed the "Air WAC" exam- 
ination and was sworn in Satur- 
day in Cincinnati. Pvt. Farris is 
expectig her call to training any 
time. 

Mr. Jess Hopperton is enjoying 
a vacation in Florida. 

Mr. and Mrs. Montgomery and 
Mrs.. Montgomery's mother of 
Latonia spent Monday and Mon- 
day night the guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Gilbert Brewster and family 
of Verona, Ky. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Stephenson 
spent the week-end in Walton 
with relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmo Taggert and 
family of Dayton, Ohio spent the 
week-end with Mr. Traggert's 
perents. 

Pvt. Raymond McClure from 
Camp Housing, Texas spent Sun- 
day with^iis sister, Mrs. Raymond 
Cheesman and family. 

Aunt Lucy Holsclaw still re- 
mains quiet ill at the home of 
Edith Black and daughter of S. 
Main St. • 

Sgt. Marvin Robinson from 
Florida who is in the Army is 
home pn a furlough. He left for 
Rushville, Ind. to visit his wife 
and small daughter after stopping 
at Walton to see his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. C. R. Robinson and 
family. 

Mrs. Omer Dudgeon went to 
Covington Tuesday to see her 
husband who is at St. Elizabeth 
hospital. 



pj1/w w ^|/ v « ■ *^l/ v «» -'l/*** ■■^/v— >*U f * . ,fir*** « »*ip+* 

f I L HAMILTON & SON 

FUNERAL SERVICE 



VERONA 



-l- 



KKNTTJCKY 



JL 



j»|p*ii>i " M *<!«»» <»*^ » * i m U pw w*ii*>' »»*Ji— " —*<■>■ — 



<*B 



Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Robinson, 
Johnnie Cross, . wife and baby 
motored to Rushville, Ind. Sun- 
day to spend the day with Mr. 
and Mrs. John Meyers and family 
who are the father and mother of 
their son's wife, who is making her 
home with her parents in Rush- 
ville. 

Mr. Mark Benson of High St. 
was visiting his son Dewey Ben- 
son and family of Burlington last 
week. • * \ 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Farris are 
moving back to their, home town, 

Millersburg, Ky. this week. Sorry 
to see them move away from our 
community. 



Miss Daisy V. Hill is pleasantly 
located in the C. B. Taylor Store 
property across from Phoenix 
Hotel. 



CARD OF THANKS 



We wish to express our sincere 
thanks to our neighbors and 
friends who were so kind to us 
after the passing of our beloved 
husband and father, 

- James Wm. Beach 

Especial! do we thank Rev. A. 
K. Johnson for his consoling 
words and Fred Hamilton for his 
splendid service. 

—Wife and family. 



-— 



NEW JAMES 
THEATRE 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 

SHOW EACH AND EVERY NITE 
AT 7:30 CENTRAL WAR TIME. 
SUNDAY MATINEE AT 2:30 
CENTRAL WAR TIME. BAR- 
GAIN NIGHTS MONDAY AND 
THURSDAY. 

All children regardless of age 
must have a ticket for each show. 
No parking allowed west of side- 
walk In front of Theatre or filling 
station adjoining. Police Orders. 



Sonja Henie - Jack Oakie - Cesar 
Romero - Carole Landis 

WINTERTIME 

FRI. & SAT., FEBRUARY ll-12th 



'V Is For 
Vision 

Everybody has a part In the 
drive for VICTORY. Good eye- 
sight Is of vital Importance. Eye 
strain and defective vision keeps 
a person below normal, when it 
is his or her patriotic duty to feel 
as well and strong as possible. 

Come In today and have your 
eyes examined. 

FRANK RIGGS 

Optometrist 
Pike A Russell Covington, Ky. 



Richard Quine - Anne Gwynne 

WE'VE NEVER BEEN 
LICKED 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY I3th 



Charles Coburn - Isobel Elsom 

MY KINGDOM FOR A 
COOK 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 14th 



Stan Laurel - Oliver Hardy 

DANCING MASTERS 

TUES. & WED., FEB. 15-16th 



Henry Fonda - Mary B. Hughes 

THE OX-BOW INCIDENT 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17th 

4i <^hi # «#w # w # *i#*i # w # * # »» # *» s» 



JOHN DEERE FARM MACHINERY 
DELAVAL MILKING MACHINES 
DELAVAL CREAM SEPARATORS 



Order your implement repairs early — John Deere, 
Vulcan, Oliver. 



Bring in your sheep-shearing combs and cutersf to 
% be sharpened. 

The Jansen Hdw. Co. 

108-110 Pike Street 
Co. 0910 Covington, Ky. 



USED CARS-20 EAST FOURTH ST. 



Covington 

1937 Ford Coach 
1937 DeSota Sedan 



COlonial 3884 



„ .... $325 

_ rf—i—Jl. $375 

1937 Studebaker Sedan $350 

1937 Dodge Coach 11 $350 

1937 Oldsmobile " $375 

1937 Studebaker Coupes (Two) $350 

1937 Chrysler Sedan $295 

1938 Willys Sedan $325 

1939 Hudson Sedan $695 

1936 Cadillac $325 

1936 Packard Sedan . $275 

1936 Lincoln Zepher (4-door) $295 

1936 Chevrolet Coupe '. $275 

1936 Chevrolet Sedan ......1.... $245 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 



Public Auction 

SAT., FEB. 12th 

AT 2:00 P. M. 

LOCATED ON ROUTE 42 NEAR BEACON LIGHT 
BEAVER, KENTUCKY 

On premises of Harold Bacon known as Doud Farm. All farm- 
ing tools as I have no use for same and will sell at absolute 
auction, no strings tied to this sale. 

Fordson Tractor, Oliver Tractor Flew, Disc Harrow, Drag 
Harrow, Gravity Mowing Machine. 36-mch.; 4-Tier Fatting 
Battery, 5-Tier Tuxedo Brooder. Electric Col. Brooder, Oil 
Colony Brooder, Oil Incubator, Runaway Bed - Pad, Lot Drink- 
ing Fountain; Chickens, Scythe, Gas Stove, Iron Pump (Laid 
in Kitchen), Coal Hod, 1 Set Saines, Weed Cutter, 1 Rug, 
Toilet, Flush Top; Electric Plate, 2 burner; Sack Hog Feed. 

HAROLD BACON, Owner 
REL C. WAYMAN, Agent 

623 Washington Ctreet Covington HE. 5107 Ind. 5066 



. GOODE'S 

TOBACCO SEED 

Worthington's Ky. Experiment Station Certified 
No.4 LA and No. 16 White Burley. 
Root-Rot Resistant 

Chancellor & Duncan's Ky. Experiment Station, 
New Improved Big White Burley No. 16. 
Root-Rot Resistant 

Casey's Crossed Tobacco Seed, Type No. 1 and 
Twist Bud. 

Guaranteed To Grow 

Warner's Golden Burley, Improved White Burley, 
Re-cleaned and tested at Ky. Experiment Station. 

Judy's Pride — The Old Reliable. 
Price of All Seed: 

On-half Oz., 75c - Die Oz, $1.50 

GEO. C. G00DE 

23 Pike St. 22 W. Seventh St. Covington, Ky. 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



Thursday, February 10, 1944 



Si 



WEEKLY NEWS ANALYSIS 



History's Biggest Naval Bombardment 
Precedes Major Action on Marshalls; 
Russians Surge Onward Toward Baltic; 
Civilian Fat, Oil Allotments Decreased 

(EDITOR'S NOTE: When opinions are expresaed in theie column!, they are thoae of 

Western Newspaper Union's new* analysis and not necessarily ol this newspaper.) 

a Released by Western Newspaper Union. __^^^_^___ 




LIFE INSURANCE: 
Claims Mount 

Deaths of men in military service 
and the effects of stress and strain 
on the civilian population have con- 
tributed to a 18 per cent rise in life 
insurance benefits since 1939. 

During the same period, however, 
there has been an increase of 22 per 
cent of insurance in force to a rec- 
ord-of 139 billion dollars, with wom- 
en recently employed accounting for 
many of the new policies. 

Because of this increase in the 
total amount Qf life insurance out- 
standing, the mortality rate has been 
about the same as in 1939, and lower 
than in any year prior to 1938. In 
1943, 1 billion 100 million dollars was 
paid out in claims. 

War Casualties 

U. S. war casualties so far total 
146,188, with 33,153 dead, 33,167 miss- 
jing, 49,518 wounded and 29,898 pris- 
oners. 

Army casualties number 109,434, 
divided among 17,480 killed, 24,806 
missing, 41,533 wounded and 25,615 
prisoners. 

The navy reported 36,752 casual- 
ties, of whom 15,673 were killed, 
B.811 missing, 7,985 wounded and 
4,283 prisoners. 

Of the 2,000 prisoners who died in 
enemy camps, most were under Jap- 
anese control, it was reported. 




Solomons — Marines plod through heavy mud during operations 
•gainst last big Jap base of Bougainville in Solomons. 



MID-PACIFIC: 
Japs Crumbling 

With stalwart U. S. doughboys 
pounding at other positions in the 
Marshalls from beachheads they es- 
tablished in the very heart of the 
islands, Jap forces slowly relin- 
quished their grip on these m'id- 
Paciflc strongholds menacing Allied 
supply lines to the Philippines. 

In attacking the .Marshalls after 
the greatest naval bombardment in 
U. S. history, American troops were 
put ashore on one of the most im- 
portant of the islets making up the 
group. From here, the doughboys 
trained their guns on the biggest 
air base and the best submarine 
and seaplane station, in the whole 
island cluster. 

With the memory of strong Jap 
fortifications of Tarawa in the Gil- 
berts still in mind, the U. S. spared 
none of the firepower of its navy or 
air force to smash at enemy instal- 
lations in the Marshalls before 
troops clambered ashore. But de- 
spite. the terrific battering, Jap units 
took up the fight when doughboys 
landed, again making it no picnic. 

TAXES: 

Lawmakers Agree 

Falling far short of the adminis- 
tration's request for 10% billion dol- 
lars in new taxes, a conference com- 
mittee of senators and congressmen 
agreed on raising 2 billion 300 mil- 
lion, to bring. 1944 revenue to about 
44 billion dollars. 

More than a billion dollars of the 
new taxes would be collected on 
higher levies for goods and services, 
new' rates amounting to 1 cent for 
•very 5 cents admission charge, 
|9 per gallon of 100 proof liquor, $8 
per barrel of beer, 20 per cent on 
furs, jewelry and luggage, 15 per 
cent on transportation, and in- 
creased rates on club dues, bowling 
alleys and pool tables. The tax on 
cosmetics would be raised to 20 per 
' cent. 

1 Air mail rates would be raised to 
8 cents, 3 cent stamps would be re- 
quired on local mail deliveries, and 
charges would be increased on 
C.O.D., registered and insured mail, 
and on rnoney orders. 

By abolishing the earned income 
credit and deductions for payment 
of federal excise taxes, the lawmak- 
ers figured on raising 600 million in 
additional income taxes. Another 500 
million would be raised by increas- 
ing the excess profits tax from 90 
to 95 per cent. 

RUSSIA: 

ear Baltic 



JVjw '^^^& J %!3!!*z$3SV% 



*' 



Churning deeply into Nazi lines, 
Red troops pressed onto the borders 
of the Baltic states of Estonia and 
Latvia, while in the Ukraine 400 
miles to the south, heavy fighting 
continued in fluctuating counterat- 
tacks. 

Russians surged toward the nar- 
row belts of land making up Estonia 
and Latvia on the Baltic sea coasts 
after rolling the .Nazis back from 
around Leningrad and seizing con- 
trol of the large network of rail- 
roads in the area, including the dou- 
ble track running to Moscow. 

Employing upwards of 250,000 men 
the Reds hammered big dents in the 
German lines, forcing enemy re- 
treats with the threat of encircle- 
ment from the rear. 

Having given ground before Ger- 
man counterattacks 80 miles from 
the Rumanian border, the Reds 
struck back both to the east and west 
of this region, chewing into enemy 
lines behind intense artillery and 
tank fire. 



EUROPE: 

Nutcracker Closing 

The big Allied nutcracker in south- 
ern Italy slowly closed on embattled 
Nazi troops below Rome, while U. S. 
and British bombers hammered 
away at the enemy's defense instal- 
lations and supply centers in north- 
western Europe. 

Despite bitter German resistance, 
U. S. and French forces chewed 
deeper into the Nazis' network of 
pillboxes and barbed wire around 
the mountain stronghold of Cassino, 
about 40 miles south of the Allies' 
invasion beaches near Rome. With 
supplies pouring onto the sandy 
beachheads, U. S. and British troops 
organized their strength for sharp 
thrusts at the enemy's' communica- 
tion lines feeding their forces at 
Cassino, but encountered bitter op- 
position. ', . ' 

Although Berlin again came in for 
a major share of Allied bombing in 
northwestern Europe, the whole in- 
vasion coast was peppered with ex- 
plosives designed to cripple the long 
string of concrete and steel defense 
posts. Reports indicated that the 
Germans were pulling seasoned 
troops out of Russia to reinforce Jut- 
land, the closest land approach to 
Berlin. 

FOOD SUPPLY: 
World Prospects 

With food production here at its 
peak and overseas demands Increas- 
ing, the U. S. may 
have to go along on 
smaller supplies in 
1944, Secretary of 
Agriculture Claude 
Wickard declared. 

Of our Allies, 
Great Britainshould 
maintain her pres- 
ent nutritional 
standards because 
of increased home 
Claude wickard production and an 
improvement in the 
shipping situation, Wickard said, but 
he was less optimistic of Russia, re- 
porting that with the Germans oc- 
cupying its rich agricultural regions 
earlier in 1943 the country now faced 
actual starvation. 

Although Germany is better off 
than it was during World War I, 
conditions have further deteriorated 
throughout the rest of Europe, Wick- 
ard said. Japan's control over East 
Asia gives her a rich source of food- 
stuffs, but their availability to the 
homeland is restricted by the en- 
emy's shipping facilities, Wickard 
pointed out. 

Less Fats, Oils 

Civilian allotments of fats and oils 
in 1944 will average less than last 
year, the War Food 
administration un- 
der Marvin Jones 
announced. 

Approximately 21 
per cent of the na- 
tion's supply will be 
shipped to U. S. al- 
lies, it was report- 
ed, with Russia and 
Great Britain re- 
ceiving 16.3 per cent 
of the total. 

Under the allot- 
ments, each U. S. civilian will get 
about 43.9 pounds of butter, lard, 
shortenings and other oils and mar- 
garine, compared with 46.5 pounds 
last year, and 48.8 pounds in 1942. 

Allotments ' for cooking oils and 
vegetable oil shortenings will aver- 
age 14.3 pounds per person as com- 
pared with 16.4 pounds in 1943, and 
13.9 pounds of lard as against 14.3 
pounds. 



Baby Smaller 




When 6 pound 5 ounce Paulette 
Matthes was born a year ago In 
Chicago, doctors held little hope for 
her life. But Paulette recently cele- 
brated her first birthday, although 
weighing 3 ounces less than at birth 
in a case that has baffled physicians. 

Twenty-two inches long, little 
Paulette can only digest a little of 
formula and water, and she has re- 
quired so much care that her moth- 
er has scarcely slept since her 
birth. The Matthes also have a 
thriving young son, Ronald, 4. 

PRESSURE COOKERS: 

400,000 Authorized 

Because more and more home' 
makers have taken to canning to 
avert shortages of fruits and vege- 
tables in off seasons, the War Pro- 
duction board has authorized manu- 
facture of 400,000 aluminum pres- 
sure cookers during the first six 
months of 1944. 

Although 339,000 pressure canneri 
were made from carbon steel last 
year, use of aluminum was banned 
in January of 1942. Because of a 
shortage of capacity for fabricating 
aluminum, none will be available for 
manufacture of other kitchen uten- 
sils. 

Under WPB plans, Jfce new alumi- 
num pressure cookers will not be 
rationed and will be offered for sale 
without restriction. Three-fifths ol 
U. S. families canned last year, it 
has been estimated, with an average 
per family of 165 jars or cans. 



Monkey Shines 



When Private Floyd Steward ol 
San Pedro, Calif., plunged into a 
watery shell hole in North Africa 
during a bombing raid and came up 
with a baby monkey, it was one ol 
the best moves he ever made. 

Private Steward's constant com- 
panion after that, the monkey found front. 



Washington, D. C. 
SIGNIFICANCE OF RUSSIAN 
BLAST 

Members of the diplomatic corps 
who have lived beside Russia and 
dealt with her diplomats for years 
point to some significant things 
about the Pravda report which set 
the world on its ear about the Brit- 
ish negotiating a separate peace 
with Nazi Foreign Minister Ribben- 
trop. 

In the first place; diplomats point 
out that, had the report been pub- 
lished in Izvestia, it would have been 
much more serious. Izvestia Is the 
organ of the Soviet government, and 
anything appearing therein can be 
considered the gospel views of the 
Kremlin itself. 

However, Pravda, organ; W the 
Communist party, is one step re- 
moved, and anything published in it 
can be interpreted as close to but 
not necessarily representing the 
views of Stalin. 

Thus, it was -Pravda which 
dropped a ton of editorial bricks on 
the unsuspecting, well-intentioned 
head of Wendell Willkie, hitherto 
considered Russia's best friend. 
That editorial rebuke came after 
Willkie had discussed the Polish 
boundary question— in a manner 
quite sympathetic to Russia. 

However, the Russians chose to 
rebuke their best friend as a warn- 
ing to President Roosevelt and Sec- 
retary Hull that they did not want 
the Polish question discussed at all 
-<»ot even by their friends. They 
could not very well come out and 
rebuke Hull and Roosevelt, so they 
chose a prominent American, one 
step removed, figuring Hull and 
Roosevelt would take the hint. 

Therefore, remembering that Rus- 
sian diplomatic moves are usually 
aimed obliquely at something on the 
other side of the billiard table, here 
is the diplomatic corps' explanation 
of the latest Pravda thrust against 
the British. 

For about two years. It has been 
no secret that the British have hung 
back regarding a second front In 
western Europe. It is also no se- 
cret that, right down to the Teheran 
conference, Churchill pulled for a 
Balkan front or almost any other 
front except a western front. 

• a o 

PUTTING BRITISH ON SPOT 

Stalin is a man who never for- 
gets and, even if no friction had 
occurred at Teheran, he would have 
continued to be suspicious about 
British Intentions of a second front, 
in view of the two years of second 
front debate. And on top of Tehe- 
ran, plus Churchill's long stay In 
Africa, Stalin's suspicions may be 
boiling again. 

Therefore, point out the diplomats, 
what could be more adroit than to 
put the British squarely on the spot 
by subtly accusing them of talking 
to the Nazis about a separate peace? 
In other words, after the Pravda 
article, the British now have to 
prove they want no separate peace 
by pushing ahead with the second 
If they delay it, then the 



Washington Di9est; 



FAO Draws Up Plans for 
'Family of Nations' Buying 

Food and Agriculture Organization Aims at 

Expanded Production, Increased Trade 

Within Countries Involved. 




By BAUKHAGE 

Newt Analyst and Commentator. 




Marvin Jones 



HIGHLIGHTS 



in the week's newt 



PENICILLIN: When it becomes 
plentiful enough, penicillin may re- 
place sulfa drugs in dental practice. 

LONG WAIT: Twenty-six years 
afterward, a Blooming ton, 111., vet- 
eran has been notified that he has 
been awarded the Purple Heart. He 
was wounded by shell fragments at 
St. MihieL, France, September 5, 
1918. Since then he has undergone 
33 operations. j 



ALUMINUM: Stimulated by war 
needs, production of aluminum has 
reached enormous proportions com- 
pared with prewar standards. Pro- 
duction capacity is so great that the 
light metal may be used as a sub- 
stitute for steel. Aluminum parts 
could be used in automobiles, farm 
machinery, refrigerators, washing 
machines, window sasn, and simi- 
lar article*. 



grapes and berries for him when he 
was. lost in the wild country for 
days; chattered noisily when he and 
14 other soldiers were about to drink 
from a poisoned waterhole, and by 
loud yelping, directed rescuers to 
the spot where he had been buried 
under debris by an exploding shell 

DEBTS:* 
Consumers Cut Total 

At the end of 1943, Americana 
could look beyond to postwar mar- 
kets to more possible spending, fol- 
lowing reduction'' of' consumer in- 
debtedness by 1 billion, 200 million 
dollars during the last year' because 
of continued goods shortages. 

Installment loans also showed a 29 
per cent slump for the year, and 
charge accounts were cut, but only 
by 15 million dollars. 

At the end of 1943, automobile 
credit outstanding was one-third of 
the total of 1942. 

Warns Farmers 

* A 15 per cent Increase in land 
prices since 1942 reflects a threaten- 
ing" speculative spree, Governor A. 
G. Black of the Farm Credit ad- 
ministration warned. 

Declaring that farm land in the 
Central West and parts of the South 
was selling 20 to 30 per cent above 
federal land bank appraisals, Gover- 
nor Black said some buyers were 
courting disaster if they could not 
reduce mortgages to an amount that 
could be carried by normal earn- 
ings. 

Spurring demands, Governor Black 
said, are a large number of city 
people with large incomes, who hava 
been putting their money into farm 
land. 

VETS' AID 

It is estimated that 300,000 beds 
will be needed by 1949 to care for 
veterans of this and previous wars. 
As hospitalization is now open to all 
men and women of the armed forces, 
whether their disability is service- 
connected or not, Brig. Gen. Frank 
Hines, veterans' administrator, ex- 
pects to have training camp facili- 
ties turned over to him for conver- 
sion into hospital accommodation!. 

Few of the injuries and ailments 
for which servicemen receive gov- 
ernment care are battle casualties. 



Russians can point to the suspicion 
— no matter how untrue — that per- 
haps the British were talking to 
Ribbentrop after all — which, of 
course, they weren't 

The Pravda publication fits in, 
especially at this time, when there 
actually have been some hints in 
official circles that the Russians 
are doing so well that the Nazis will 
surrender soon, then we wouldn't 
need a second front. 

If s complicated, but the Russian 
mind is complicated, and Russian 
diplomacy even more so. 

• • • 
SOFTENING CASUALTY 

L , MESSAGES 

The war department has received 
many letters recently from minis- 
ters and private families, suggest- 
ing that, instead of sending casu- 
alty messages by telegram to be- 
reaved families, they be sent to a 
committee 'Of pastors in each com- 
munity, 'one of whom -would then 
deliver the message and seek to 
soften the blow of the tragic news. 

So far, however, the war depart- 
ment has taken the position that it 
should continue delivery of the casu- 
alty messages by Western Union 
messenger boy. Army officials ar- 
gue that delivery by a clergyman 
would cause confusion and delay, 
and that a clergyman might not be 
available at the time, or he might 
lack proper and immediate transpor- 
tation. 

Also, the army argues that a casu- 
alty message has a high priority, 
which means that its transmission is 
expedited, and this might be offset 
by delay at the receiving end if 
the message had to pass through 
the hands of a clergyman. 

• • • 

CAPITAL CHAFF 

C When diplomats run out of liquor, 
that's a story. Carlos Campbell of 
the Chilean embassy burst into the 
office of Chilean Ambassador Mich- 
els, saying, "Don Rodolfo, please 
lend me a case of wine for tonight; 
I'm having a party I" "I can't do it," 
replied the ambassador. "I have 
no wine myself I " 

C. In the Library of Congress, back 
numbers of Esquire are kept in the 
Delta Collection, a special collection 
of sex books snd other erotica avail- 
able to adults, not to adolescent*. 



WNU Service, Union Trust Building, 
Washington, D. C. 

When the President introduced his 
second bill of rights into .his State 
of the Union message to congress 
and skillfully linked the past and 
future with it, he set up old argu- 
ments among the elite of Washing- 
ton's cracker-barrel set. 

When "Old Dr. New Deal" was 
set aside as the guardian of Amer- 
ican welfare, some folks hereabouts 
insisted that he had plans for con- 
siderably extending his practice lat- 
er — that his friend, Franklin D., was 
planning on a "World New Deal." 

Like all smoke, it signalizes a fife 
somewhere. 

There is no doubt that even though 
the realistic Mr. Churchill and the 
realistic Mr. Stalin didn't see eye to 
eye on everything as they looked at 
each other across the green table at 
Teheran, we have reason to believe 
that both are pretty well sold on 
what they each think can be done 
in the way of a little international 
"welfare work" which would raise 
the decibels which measure the hum 
of business in their respective coun- 
tries. 

The President presented to con- 
gress the various human "rights" 
he visualized, as you recall, and 
there will be more specific data con- 
cerning them which he will submit 
to the legislators later, either just 



that a business man would use on it. 
Believe it or not, the men who are 
figuring out free lunches and the 
production programs to make them 
unnecessary hereafter are doing it 
scientifically, and even if you don't 
like the word, on a "businesslike" 
basis. 

Little has been said of this per- 
manent food organization of the 
United Nations. You hear about 
UNRRA, which is supposed to take 
care of what might be called "stra- 
tegic feeding"— that is, taking care 
of the peoples in countries the Allies 
reoccupy (hungry men and women 
are no help to anyone). The motive 
is less altruistic than military. 

But you may not have heard of 
the work of the FAO — that's an en- 
tirely unofficial abbreviation of the 
Food and Agriculture organization 
which Gpve Hambidge of the agri- 
culture administration of the de- 
partment of agriculture made up 
himself. He was appointed one of 
the secretaries of the commission 
appointed at the conference in Hot 
Springs last May. 



Work 'Going Well' 

Hambidge says the work of this 
FAO is going well. It has drawn up 
the plans for this job of permanent 
feeding. Not "free" feeding perma- 
nently, but a plan for "family buy- 
ing" — family of nations buying. Nat- 
urally there is plenty of chance for 



TE1EFACT 



UNITED NATIONS PLAN RELIEF MEALS FOR EUROPE 

■O' (DMY CALORIC CONTENT) 



PRESENT EURf 
UNITED NATH 
AVERAGE AMERICAN DIET 



400-800 CMORIES 



PRESENT EUROPEAN RATION 



UNITED NATIONS' RELIEF MEALS 



2,000 CALORIES 



3L300 CALORIES 



to keep his hand in' in case he 
contemplates, as the cracker-barrel- 
ers suggest, further personal activ- 
ity later, or merely wants to keep 
Americans thinking about all" these 
things, come the ides of November. 

About Relief 

No matter how you look at it (un- 
less you are a 100 per cent "stew-in- 
their-own-juicer") you have a sort 
of vague feeling that we ought to do 
what we can to help out people who 
are starving or freezing no matter 
where they are. I say that ad- 
visably and for proof turn to the 
record. 

One of the earliest memories of 
my childhood is tagging up Main 
Street on my mother's hand and see- 
ing a dishpan in front of the "Silver 
Dollar" (not the original) filled with 
dollar bills. My mother dropped In 
a quarter and hurried past the sin- 
ister abode. Passersby tossed in 
their currency for the sufferers of 
■ome Chinese famine or Italian 
earthquake (perhaps Pompeii and 
Herculaneum, I don't recall). 

America is always willing to go 
down deep in its pockets for "relief." 
But it doesn't seem to like it if gov- 
ernment runs the show. Nobody on 
Main Street knew how much of the 
dishpan's contents reached the quak- 
ing Italians or what-have-you and 
how much never got past the "Silver 
Dollar's" back room, but nobody 
cared. . 

On the other hand, even when the 
money is triple-checked by the gov- 
ernment and investigated by the 
opposition, if it is taken out of the 
general kitty, Americans don't Like 
it. That's playing Santa Claus. When 
they can shell out individually, it's 
all right— which may be perfectly 
logical from a psychological view- 
point. 

However this may be, your gov- 
ernment is going right ahead and 
preparing a program for taking out 
the wrinkles and concealing the ribs 
of a starving world just the same — 
it is also doing something more, 
helping the starvers raise more of 
their own food. 

They are trying to organize the 
job with the same business acumen 



differences of opinion but Hambidge 
puts it this way: 

"Pa wants a certain kind of en- 
gine. May has her eye on the up- 
holstery. Sis prefers a certain body 
color. Junior — he's thinking about 
the gadgets on the instrument panel. 
But the main thing is— they all want 
a car. They end up by getting one 
that isn't quite what anybody ex- 
pected—but one that's durable, and 
a good buy, and gets them where 
they want to go. 

"In other words, they compromise. 
Each one gives up his own pet ideas 
to get a car that will be serviceable 
for the whole family. 

"And that's what will happen," 
says Hambidge, "with the Food and 
Agriculture organization. The In- 
terim commission has been working 
out a constitution— a broad plan of 
operation, showing what the organ- 
ization will do and how it will do it, 
and a general budget, so we'll know 
what the work will cost. Along about 
March, probably, they will have 
these plans ready to submit formally 
to the 40-odd governments. If there's 
quick approval — the organization 
should be set up and ready to go 
not too long after that" 

Two things FAO is aiming at: ex- 
panded production within the 'coun- 
tries involved, and increased trade 
between the countries involved. 

Some countries, for instance, just 
can't produce enough of the right 
kinds of foods to feed their people 
properly; others can produce cer- 
tain foods— like wheat, for instance 
— only at very great cost. 

The FAO, its members say, aims 
to get away from the old isolationist 
idea that prevailed almqst every- 
where before the war— with every 
country trying to meet all its own 
needs which ended up with a smash- 
ing big depression and a whopping 
big war. What the FAO can do to 
prevent such world catastrophes, 
according to Hambidge, remains to 
be seen, * 

That is what this very silent com- 
mittee, or commission or whatever 
you want to call it, is doing— making 
an attempt at prophylaxis— an at- 
tempt' to cure the disease instead of 
the symptoms. 



BRIEFS . . . by Baukhage 



Prewar model baby carriages, 

strollers, walkers, and pushcart* will 

reappear on the market in about 

six weeks, according to the WPB. 
• • • 

Net cash farm income for the 
three years 1941 through 1943 was 
over 2% times such average net in- 
come for the five years preceding 
the outbreak of war.— The People'* 
Lobby. 



War Food administration has an- 
nounced it will soon release about 
440,000 cases of canned pork and 

beans to civilian consumers. 
• • • 

The Japanese explanation of the 
main points of their taxation law 
revision bills, when translated by 
U. S. government monitors, com- 
prised a single-spaced document a 
little more than four feet long. 



Q.$ew~(imefya\ops 

HELP PREVENT 

MANY 

COLDS 

from developing 

Put a few drops of Va-tro-nol up 
each nostril at the very first sniffle 
or sneeze. Its quick action 
aids Nature's defenses ._._- 
against colds. Follow WICKS 

uXarVA-IRO-NOl 




Palace Gets Plumbing 

Modern plumbing is being in- 
stalled- for the first time in the 
servants' quarters of Buckingham 
palace, royal residence in Eng- 
land. 



Bsg 



9t*n* 



HAl RT0Hi 

^00MIH« 



25* 



Spider Lives Hifjh 

The attid spider is the highest 
living inhabitant in the world- 
found at 22,000 feet on Mount 
Everest, In India. 



I:,- 



SSSgSrS 

a,,, shine. TOOTH 

Ct\tOXj^-o^ 

Invest in Liberty it 
it it BuyWarBonda 



BET 
AFTER 

With 



RHEUMATIC PAIN 

a HsiitiM list ■III hn HmH 

It you suffer from rheumatic pain 

or muscular aches, buy C- 2223 today 
for real pain-relieving help. 60c, $1. 
Caution: Use only as directed. First 
bottle purchase price refunded by 
druggist if not satisfied. Get 02223, 



FAL5E TEETH 



HELD FIRMLY BY 



NOW WEAR YOUR PLATES EVERYDAY 
-HELD COMFORTABLY SNUG THIS WAY 

It's^o easy to wear your plates regu- 
larly—all day— when held firmly in 
Slace by this "comfort-cushion^'— a 
entist's formula. 



I. Dr.Wernet'ePow- 
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solid foods — avoid 
embarrassment of 
loose plates. Helps 
prevent sore gums, 
a. Largest selling 



plate powder. 
S. Economical; 
small amount lasts 
longer. 

4.Dr. Wemet's pow- 
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pleasant tasting. 



All dngglOt-SOi. Mommy backif moldmllghlmd 



LARGEST SELLING PLATE 
POWDER IN THE WORLD 




SNAPPY FACTS 

ABOUT 

RUBBER 




Tire life on rough gravel reads 
is about 40 par cent lass than 
aa smooth concrete pave- 
ments. This was proved by 
tests conducted by the lewa 
State College. 

Soap.lt develops. Is to be a grow- 
ing factorlnmaintaining motor trans- 
portation. It has been estimated 
that 1 million pounds of soap will 
be required for one year's produc- 
tion of synthetic rubber. 

Camelback, which gets its 
name because it originally- 
had a hump in the center, is 
a growingly Important prod- 
uct af the rubber industry. 
Over 30 million pounds of 
camelback are now being 
made monthly to recap tires. 



At^+?KfZ~*~ 



Ifttwiczp&zce 



BFGoodrich 



Hf<ST IN RUBBER 



*rt»T 



\\Sr*[ 



I Wm\w 



THURSDAY, FEB. 10th, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



ORDINANCE NO. 

An ordinance providing for the 
•ale of a Franchise by the town 
of Walton, Kentucky, for. the pur- 
pose of constructing, maintaining 
and operating an Electric Dis- 
tribution System therein. 

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF 
THE TOWN OF WALTON, 
KENTUCKY, DO ORDAIN AB 
FOLLOWS: 
Section 1 — That the town clerk 



advertise in two successive weekly 
issues of the Walton Advertiser 
next preceeding day of sale, that 
he will on the 11th day of Feo* 
ruary, 1944, up to twelve o'clock; 
noon, receive sealed bids for a 
Franchise to be clearly described 
in such advertisement as "A Fran- 
chise for constructing, maintain- 
ing and operating an Electric 
Light, Heat and Power Plant in 
the town of Walton, Kentucky, for 
a period of Twenty (20) years; 



/ 



•c 



Qtrv 



m i t^fm n^ #vi>.< fl fV— I — ^fV« mQ ftm B ^ fcgBgJ p H M 



!/* 



A Savings 

A«ountm«ans 

Security and 

Safety for 

th« -future. 

Build YOUR 

a«ounfnow. 



Working 
steadily? 

Then save 

regularly 

for you'll 

need money 

after the war. 




INSURED 



FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

; on: o v i n g t o n 

- Ml MAIN STREET (Offiw Open Dally) 



inmpjfft ■ iipJHB 



PEOPLES UBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 

Deposits Insured Under the Federal 
Deposit lusurance Corporation . . . 



with the right reserved to the 
town to reject any or all bids." 
Section 96.020 of KRS provides: 

(1) "Each person desiring to 
bid for the franchise offer- 
ed for sale under KRS 
96.020 shall first deposit 
with the proper officer of 
the city, cash or a certified 
check equal to five per cent 
of the fair estimated cost 
of the plant required ' to 
render the service. The de- 
posit shall be forfeited to 
the city in case the bid is 
accepted and the bidder 
fails for thirty days after 
the confirmation of the 
sale, to pay the price bid 
and to give a sufficient 
bond in a sum equal to one 
fourth of the fair estimated 
cost of the plant to be 
erected. The bond shall be 
conditioned to be enforcible 
in case the person giving 
it falls, within a reasonable 
time, to establish a suitable 
plant for rendering the ser- 
vice and begin rendering 
the service in the manner 
set forth in the terms of 
the sale." 

(2) "This section shall not 
apply to a person already 
owning, "in a city other 
than a city of the first 
class, a plant and "equip- 
ment sufficient to render 
the service required under 
the "franchise". 

When bids are so received for 
such franchise, the town clerk shall 
hold same, sealed, until the next 
regular meeting of the board of 
trustees of the town, when and 
where all such bids shall be open- 
ed and examined by the board of 
trustees; and if no acceptable bid 
is received, reject all bids; but if 
an acceptable bid is found, said 
board shall so declare by ordin- 
ance or resolution then and there 



When In Coyington 




•WOr-THRlFTY 1 



at 

LANG'S CAFETERIA 

623-625 Madison Ave. 
Covington 



POBLIC SALE 

J 

Having sold my farm I will sell at auction on the 
Florence and Burlington Pike near Limaburg L_ 

SAT., FEB. 12th 

10:30 A. M., (CWT) 

farm Implements 

New 2-horse cultivator; 2-horse corn drill with fertilizer compart- 
ments; turning plows; tooth, acme & disk harrows; grass seed drill 
and hand sower; 2 single & 2 double shovel plows; dixie plow and 
other one horse plows; one horse & two horse sled; 2 wagons with 
box bed and hay frame; dump wagon; hay tedder; mowing machine; 
hay rake; horse drawn lawn roller; 2-horse field roller; manure 
spreader; triple, double, & single trees; 2 corn shelters; cutting box; 
hay fork, pulleys, and rope; hog crates and loading shute; ladders; 
10% rolls of New barbed wire; 2 Otawa log saw outfits; 40 gallon 
roofing paint; hand plant setter; tobacco sticks; 2 good tarpaulins; 
platform scales; all necessary hog killing tools, including extra good 
lard & sausage mill ; 2-25 gal iron kettles ; 1 -1 5 gal iron kettle ; fencing 
tools and woven wire stretchers; lot of carpenter tools and vise, grind 
stone; moor emery wheel; cow chains; lot of burlap sacks; electric 
cream separator; milk can & buckets; 2 oil tanks; mattoxs, hoes, 
shovels, pitch forks, bolts, and other small tools; 122 rifle; hay; some 
baled straw and corn. 

LIVESTOCK 
4 milk cows; 1 extra good belegian mare; 60 sheep to lamb in March. 

HOUSEHOLD GOODS 

1 cook stove; coal hot blast heater; circulating heater; 2 gas cook 
• -stoves; perfection coal oil range; 3 sanitary folding beds; 3 bedsteads; 

2 wash stands; 1 bureau; 2 grass-rugs; child's play pen and crib bed; 
1 feather bed; few chairs; 12 ft. extension table; small tables; sewing 
machine; wardrobe; victrola and records; 2 swing churns; hand 
churn; lard jars; odd lot of dishes; pans & iron pots; and other tools 
and articles too numerous to mention. 

LUNCH SERVED ON GROUNDS 

TERMS— CASH 

Mrs. Sadie B. Tanner 

Col. Lute Bradford & Col. Worthington, Auctioneers L. E. Aylor, Clerk 



adopted, and sell said franchise 
to the accepted bidder, provided 
he has fully complied with, or 
exempted by, said section 96.020 
KRS above; and the deposits of 
all unsuccessful bidders shall be 
Immediately returned to them 
after such franchise is sold, or all 
bids rejected. 
Section 2 — 

(a) That the purchase of this 
franchise shall authorize 
and permit the purchaser, 
his successors and assigns, 
to construct, maintain and 
operate a general distribut- 
ing Electric system in the 
town of Walton, Kentucky, 
with full right to occupy 
any or all of the streets, 
alleys, avenues and-or 
public places of the town as 
now laid out, or may here- 
after during the life of this 
franchise, be opened and 
dedicated to public use, 
with its poles, wires, guy- 
wires and any other neces- 
sary line equipment for the 
continuous period of twenty 
(20) years from and after 
the date of his or its pur- 
chase of this franchise. 

(b) In the construction of such 
Electric system, all work: in, 
on, over or under the streets 
alleys, avenues and-or 
public places of the town, 
shall be done in a neat and 
workman like manner; and 
all surplus dirt, litter and 
trash created by such work 
shall immediately be clean- 
ed up, removed and dispos- 
ed of as directed by the 
town trustees. 

(c) The location of all poles, 
cross-arms, guy wires and 
other line equipment shall 
be such as not to interfere 
in any way with free ingress 
and egress over their usual 
and customary way or ways 
to any private property; or 
interfere with the public 
traffic or pedestrians in the 
free and unhampered use of 

. all streets, alleys, avenues 
and-or public places any 
ways of the town. 

(c) The owner and operator of 
this franchies may, when 
necessary, trim any -tree 
overhanging the public 
streets, alleys and ways of 
the town; but such work 
shall be done in a reason- 
able and prudent manner, 
and with the least damage 
possible thereto.' 

(d) The franchise hereby offer- 
ed for sale is not to be ex- 
clusive; and the town of 
Walton may at any time 
during the life of this fran- 
chise, offer and sell another 
franchise for same purpose. 

<e) The purchaser of this fran- 
chise, his successors and 
assigns, shall provide con- 
tinuous twenty-four per day 
standard electric service to 
all consumers of electric 
current hereunder, unless 
otherwise agreed, or pre- 
vented by an act of God or 
other unavoidable tempoary 
interruption. 

(e) And shall give the town of 
Walton ample security that 
all of the terms and con- 
ditions of this franchise will 
be faithfully performed by 
him, his successors and as- 
signs. And will keep and 
maintain a general office in 
the town of Walton, Ken- 
tucky, which shall be open 
at all reasonable hours 
(except on Sunday) for the 
transaction of all business 
between such owners of this 
franchise and its patrons. 

.Section 3 — That, in the con- 
struction and maintainance of the 
Electric Distributing System pro- 
vide for herein, should the pur- 
chaser of this franchise, his or its 
successors and assigns, elect to use 
underground conduits for install- 
ing any part of its electric wires or 
other equipment, the same shall 
be^done without damage or injury 
to any of the pipes, meters or 
"other equipment of the town 
Water System or private property; 
and the location and installment 
of same shall be controled by the 
town trustees. m 

Section 4. — That, by the pur- 
chase of this franchise, the pur- 
chaser, his or its, successors and 
assigns, bind and obligate them- 
selves to promptly pay to the 
town of Walton, Kentucky, all 
damages to any street, alley, ave- 
nue or other public place or way 
of the town, or any other property 
of the town, arising or growing 
out of any act or omission done or 
omitted by such purchaser, his or 
its, agents, servants or employes 
in the construction, maintainance 
or operation of the electric dis- 
tributing system herein provided 
for; and, upon notice from the 
town so to do, shall answer and 
defend all actions for personal 
injury or damage to property that 
may be brought against the town 
of Walton, Kentucky, for damages 
suffered by reason of any neg- 
ligence of such purchaser, bis or 
its, servants, agents or employes 
in the construction, maintainance 
or operation of the electric dis- 
tributing system herein authoriz- 
ed; and to promptly pay all judge- 
ments for such damages that may 



First 12 KWH for 

Next 38 KWH at 

Next 60 KWH at 

Next 75 KWH at 

Additional KWH at 

Minimum Billing $1. per month 

Commercial Light 



First 12 KWA for 
Next 138 KWH at 
Next 300 KWA at 
Additional KWH at 
Minimum Billing $1. 



be rendered by any court against 
the town of Walton, Kentucky; 
for such damages; and to, in every 
way, Indemnify and save said 
town harmless from any loss or 
damage by reason of any negli- 
gence of the owner of this fran- 
chise, his or its, agents, servants 
or employes in the construction, 
maintainance or operation of the 
electric distributing system pro- 
vided for in this franchise. 

Bates 

Section S — The rates to be 
charged for electric current by the 
purchaser of this franchise, his or 
its successors and assigns, until, 
and unless changed by order of 
the Public Service Commission of 
Kentucky, shall be as follows; 

Residential Lighting 



$1.00 
.06c 
.04c 
.03c 
.02Hc 



$1.00 

.06c 

. .04c 

.03c 

per month 

5% added if not paid on or before 
10th day of month. 

Section 6— That, Rules 13 - 14 - 
15 - 16 - 17 - 18 - 19 - 20 - 21 - 
22 - 23 - 24 - 25 - 26 - 27 - 28 and 
29 and all existing amendments 
thereto promulgated and estab- 
lished by the Public Service Com- 
mission of Kentucky, are hereby 
made a part of this franchise as 
if copied in full herein, and the 
purchaser of this franchies, his or 
its successors and assigns, shall 
be governed thereby as to all rates 
and service charged or rendered 
by them. 

Section 7 — That, the purchaser 
of this franchise shall, before the 
sale thereof is awarded to him or 
it, pay to the town of Walton, 
Kentucky, in addition to the 
amount bid for the franchise, all 
costs and expenses incurred by 
the town in the preparation, pub- 
lication and sale of this franchise. 

This ordinance shall be in full 
force and effect after its passage 
and publication as required by 
law. 

, Pdssed by the vote of 4 members 
of the Board of Trustees of the 
town of Walton, January 28, 1944. 

J. R. CONRAD, 

Chairman of the Board of trustees 
of the town of Walton, Kentucky. 

Attest: 

R. C. BRAKEFIELD, Town Clerk, 

Pro. Tern. 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Sam Hogan, Pastor 



Sunday School at 10:00 a. m., 
(CWT), Harry Rouse, Supt. 

Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m., 
(CWT). 

B. T. U. at 7:00 p. m., (CWT), 

Evening Worship at 7:45 p. m., 
(CWT): 

Services each Sunday. You are 
cordially invited to worship with 
us 



LADY'S STOMACH WAS 
LIKE A GAS FACTORY; 
MEALS TURNED TO GAS 



One lady said recently that her 
stomach used to be like a "gas 
factory!" That is, when she ate a 
meal it seemed to turn right into 
gas. She was always bloated, had 
awful stomach gas pains, daily 
headaches and constant irregular 
bowel action. Now, however, this 
lady says she is FREE of STOM- 
ACH GAS and she says the change 
is due to taking ERB-HELP. Her 
meals agree with her. No gas or 
bloat after eating. Headaches and 
constipation are gone. "Oh! what 
relief!" states this lady. "Why 
don't other gas and constipation 
suffers get ERB-HELP?" 

ERB-HELP contains 12 Great 
Herbs; they cleanse bowels, clear 
gas from stomach, act on sluggish 
liver and kidneys. Miserable peo- 
ple soon feel different all over. So 
don't go on suffering! Get ERB- 
HELP. Jones Drug Store. 



W. E. TAIT, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 

Specialising In the 

correction and 

protec tion of 

EYESIGHT 




27 E. 7th St 

COVINGTON, KT. 



CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Walton, Ky. 



I WALTON ME 






IT CHURCH 



Walton, Ken 



Geo. S. Caroland, Minister 
Church School 10:00 a. m. 

Helen Ruth Gardiner, Supt. 
Worship, Lord's Supper 11:00 a. m. 
Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 



WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Walton, Ky. 



Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m 

B. T. U 6:30 p. m 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m 

Prayer Meeting, Wed., 7:30 p. m 



Rev. C. G. Dealing, Pastor 

Sunday School..., 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11 :00 a. m. 

Youth Fellowsihp 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Service 7:00 p. m. 



ff *wsr 

§GN< 



C~666 

•66 TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DBOPS 




Courtesy and Co-operation 

Hat enabled m t* become frre a rtngty valuMe ts g 
avblle 



DIXIE STATE BANK 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 

Member Sf Federal 



SERVICE FOR 25 YEARS! 

OUR REPUTATION IS YOUR PROTECTION 

R. Michels Welding 
Company 

722 Waahington St Covington COIonial 0670 



DIXIE'S FINEST JEWELRY STORE 

FEATURING RELIABLE QUALITY 

AT ASSURED LOWEST PRICES 

icBOCEETTco. 



U0*A 



DIXIE HIGHWAYotGro.es 

^ERLANGER 



WAKA G E R 



E FLEMING 




with modem stores in : 

MT. WASHINGTON • CHEVIOT 
NORWOOD •MAOISONVILLE 




A PENNY POST CARD WILL 
SAVEYOU DOLLARS ON 



FIELD and 



DIXIE BRAND 

SEEDS 



NEW CROP NOW ON SALE 



Begin now planning for the biggest farm 
year in history with tried and proven 
Hill's Dixie Brand Seeds — high in ger- 
mination and parity — best all-around 
results assured. 



PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL 



CCORCC W. 



Since IMS 

ILL 



AMD 



COMPANY 



SEEDSMEN SINCE 1863 



24-26 W. 
SEVENTH ST. 



25-29 PIKE 
STREET 



COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



STAFFORDSBURG 



Mrs. L. J. Rapp entertained the 
Homemakers Club on Thursday, 
February 3rd. Illness kept some of 
our most faithful members away. 

The lesson on saving energy as 
we do our work was a timely topic 
in these days of stress and strain. 
Mrs. Kenney as citizenship chair- 



man gave a talk on racil char- 
a c tiristici — of — the~ Chinese trad 
J Japanese and a short Historical 
| sketch of the two peoples. Mrs. 
Williams told, interesting items 
j from her much enjoyed trip to 
jthe Farm and Home Convention. 
i Those present were: Mr. and 
.1 NfiWr Chester Rapp, Mrs. Delia 

(Williams, Mrs. Jno. Shaw, Mrs. 
I 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

We have opened a new department of Better Grade 
Non-Rationed Shoes for Women and Girls. 



NO RATION STAMP NEEDED 

AT ANY TIME 




Shop and Save Here 



OXFORDS, PUMPS 

STRAPS and WEDGES 

Red, Green, Black and 

Brown. 

These shoes are stamp 

and money savers. 



Priced *3" to $4 <" 

Pay a little more and get a whole lot more. 

QUALITY SAMPLE SHOES 

627 MADISON AVE., COVINGTON CO. 1430 

[OPEN SATURDAY EVENINGS i 



Lee Faulkner, Mrs. Emil Stein, 
Mrs. Denver Binder and son 
Randall and Mrs. Jas. Kenney. 
The next meeting will be at the 
home of Mrs. Keeney. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Marshal 
of Georgetown were guests of her 
parents on Sunday. 

Mrs. Daisy Richardson, Miss 
Helen Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. 
Chester Ballinger and Mr. and 
Mrs. J. A. Keeney went to hear 
Rev. Nevil White hold his last ser- 
vice as "pastor of Emmanuel 
Methodist Church in Covington. 
Rev. White a local boy leaves this 
week to take up his duties as 
Supt. of the Barbourville District. 

Rev. Cardwell filled his appoint 
ment here on Sunday evening, 
but only a small number attended 
services. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stallcup spent 
Thursday visiting their daughter 
in the city. 

Mrs. Hanna spent Thursday 
with the family of her son in 
Latonia, Jimmy Lee being ill. He 
is much better at this writing. 



THURSDAY, FEB. 10th, 1944 



FOR SALE-MI 2 Acre Farm, All 
good land with 5.8 tobacco base. 
25 miles south of Covington. 6 
room house with electric. Large 
tobacco and stock barn. Chicken 
house, garage, etc. $12,000. For 
quick sale. Mrs. John Myers, 
Verona, Ky. 4t-10* 



20 YEARS in radio servicing. W. 
M. STEPHENSON, Radio spec- 
ialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Coving- 
ton. COlonial 1121. tf-10 



FOR RENT— 213 aj farm, 4^ acre 
tobacco base, little corn, a{l_ 
..tomatoes, potatoes,, beans and 
vegetables you want. Team and 
tools furnished, /cows to milk if 
wanted. See John Kalb, Inde- 
pendence, Ky., R. l, Phone Ind. 
6488. . 2t-r2* 



WASHERS REPAIRED— Author- 
ized Maytag Service, Maytag 
Oil. Wm. Hagedorn, 856 Dixie 
Highway, Erlanger, Ky. tf-49 



FOR SALE— One 9 year old horse, 
9 shoajts, 1 Jersey cow and about 
40 bales of mixed hay. E. B. 
McClure, Verona, Ky., just off 
Highway 16, on Bracht Road. 
3t-ll* 



WANTED— Man to raise 1 and 
a third acres of tobacco at 
Nicholson, Ky. Mrs. Ira Step- 
hens, Independence, Ky. Itl2* 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



RADIO REPAIRS at reasonable 
rates. COlonial 1121. 509 Scott 
Street. tf-io 




NOTICE— Pure Drinking Water 
Hauled anywhere — anytime 
Call Walton 423. Jas. E. Falls. 
tf-47 



FOR SALE; — Good paying paper 
route in Walton, Ky. See 
Richard Collins, Walton, Ky.' 
lt-11* — tf • 



FOR SALE— Two fresh Jersey 
cows, 5 years old with calves by 
side. S. J. Dickerson, Morning 
View, Ky. 2t-ll* 



FOR SALE— 75 acre farm; 3 fresh 
cows; 3 plows; yellow bloom 
sweet clover seed; alarm clock; 
mantle clock; electric iron; 
electric sweeper; Winchester 
rifle and shells; Lugor revolver; 
lawn mower and small rocker 
100 years old. B. F. Menefee, 
Williamstown, Ky. 2t-12* 




FOR SALE— 30 shoats, weight 
about 9*0 lbs. Pleasant Acres 
Farm, John L. Feagan, Rich- 
wood Rd. 2t-ll* 



.WANTED TO RENT— Good farm 
with 2 or 3 acres tobacco base, 
about 8 acres corn, will -buy half 
interest in stock on farm. Ow- 
ner to furnish team and tools 
first year. Must be convenent to 
school. Call Walton 32 or write 
J. H. Vest, 27 Locust Street, 
Walton, Ky. lt-12* 



FOR RENT— Farm, four acres 
tobacco base, 5 acres, more or 
less of corn; 10 or 12 acres hay; 
I cow; garden; team; farm 
tools; house and wood furnish- 
ed. Write Box 1, Walton or call 
59 IX on Saturday only. T. T. 
Thomas. 2t-ll* 



JUST HOW OLD 

One thing you should know about any funeral 
directing firm is how much experience it has had . . . 
how old it is. We were founded 37 years ago, which 
means that we have behind us a great many years 
of practical experience. 

CHAMBERS & GRUBBS 

Funeral Directors Phone Walton 352 







SALE OF FRANCHISE 

"A Franchise for constructing, maintaining and 
operating an Electric Light, Heat and Power Plant 
in the town of Walton, Kentucky, for a period of 
Twenty (20)* years; with the right reserved to the 
town to reject any or all bids." 

Sealed bids will be received by the Clerk of the 
Town of Walton until 12 o'clock noon on the 11th 
day of February 1944, for the purchase of a fran- 
chise ordered to be sold by the Board of Trustees 
of the Town of Walton, to construct, maintain and 
operate an electric distribution system in the town 
of Walton for a period of twenty. (20) years. 
The terms of said franchise are set out in an ordin- 
ance of the Board of Trustees of the Town of Wal- 
ton, passed and approved on the 28th day of Jan- 
uary, 1944, to which reference may be made for 
inspection by the proposed bidders. 

All bids must be sealed and marked orj the outside 
of the envelopes, "A Franchise for constructing, 
maintaining and operating an Electric Light, Heat 
and Power Plant in the town of Walton, Kentucky, 
for a period of Twenty (20) years; with the right 
reserved to the town to reject any or all bids." 

D. H. VEST, 

Clerk Town of Walton 



FOR SALE— 19 good ewes, 1 ram, 
lambing now; 2 coming yearling 
colts; 1 set farm and stock 
scales, will weigh 12,000 lbs. 
Claude Adams, Walton-Nichol- 
son Highway, Phone Ind. 6115. 
2t-ll* 



FOR SALE— Two fresh cows, one 
Jersey six yrs. old with calf by 
side and one Red cow 4 yrs. old 
with calf by side. M. J. Worth- 
ington, Bracht and Piner Road. 
2t-ll» 



FOR SALE— 250 bales of mixed 
hay. Henry Miller, Crittenden, 
Ky. 2t-ll* 



FOR SALE— Chicks, eggs from 
high-producing, tested Reds. 
Don't delay, order early. Simplex 
brooders, Salsbury remedies. 
Grant- Maddox, Florence, Ky., 
Phone 384. i5t-9" 



FARM FOR SALE— 123 S acres, 
6-room house, barn 40X60 ft., 
new fencing, tractor land, 3 .a. 
tobacco base. Reasonable terms. 
Elmer Elliston, Verona, Ky., Ph 
Walton 768. 3t-10* 



WANTED TO BUY— Used fur- 
niture, good and bad; antiques; 
coins; old glassware; old pic- 
tures; books and buttons. John 
Stubblefied. Walton, Ky., R. 2. 
Phone 495. 6t-9* 



WANTED— Two pound fryers or 
broilers. .Ful-O-Pep Feed Store, 
512 Pike St., Covington, Ky. 
HEmlock 9168. lt-12 



FOR SALE— Bed room suit, solid 
walnut; dining room suit, kit- 
chen cabinet, and cupboard. 
Elizabeth Robinson, Bedinger 
Ave., North Walton. 2t-ll* 



FOR SALE— Team mare mules, 
both good workers and single 
liners. W. D. Johnson, Walton, 
Ky., R. 1, on Green Rd., Phone 
Ind. 6721. 4t-12* 



FOR SALE— 1928 Chev. Coach, 
driven 14,000 miles, good tires; 
1934 Chev. Sedan, *air tires and 
a New-Town, hard coal Brooder 
Stove. Robert Griffin, Indepen- 
dence, Ky., Phone Ind. 6410. 
lt-12* . 



FARMS FOR SALE 



FOR SALE OR RENT— 6-room 
cottage, garage and garden, also 
store building and lot in Verona, 
Ky., Price reasonable. A. C. 
Roberts, Verona, Ky. 3t-ll* 




WANTED— To rent farm for cash. 

75 to 100 acres— will furnish 

good references. Address replies 

to Walton Advertiser, % Box S. 

lt-11* 



FOR SALE— Cuff-off Saw, made 
onto a Ford Car. Clayton Per,* 
cival, Walton, R < . 1, Phone Ind. 
6114. it-12* 



WANTED— White or colored 
woman, middle aged, to Keep 
house, stay all the time or just 
work during the day. Good 
wages. Mrs. Edith Haney, Wal- 
ton, Ky. lt-12* 



FARMS FOR SALE 



200 acres on State Road— School 
bus, milk route, % tobacco land, 
20 acres Virgin timber, 10-room 
house, large barn — $85 per acre. 

106 acres, 8-room house, 2 good 
barns, on county road, — $6500. 

65 acres, large tobacco barn, on 
good road — $4500. 

2 good homes in Town of Walton. 

If interested in buying or selling, 
Address Confidental Real Estate 
Agency, Walton, Ky. 



FOR SALE— Team of mares, 5 
and 8 years old, good workers; 
100 bales of second and third 
cutting of alfalfa hay. Phone 
Ind. 6704, J. L. Bridges, Morn- 
ing View, Ky., %, njile south of 
Fiskburg on Morning View Pike. 
2t-12* 



FOR SALE— 1934 Chevrolet 2- 
Door Sedan, 4 pre-war tires in 
A-I condition. Priced right. 
Dallas Whitson, Verona, Ky. 
2t-12* 



U. S. APPROVED BLOOD-TESTED CHICKS 

$13.25 For lOO 

Bred T » lay Also UBIKO Starter 



FOR SALE— 1936 Five Passenger 
Oldsmobile, good condition- 
Cheap. J. W^Powers, 27 Need- 
more St., Walton, Ky. lt-12* 



FOR SALE— 9 months old Pure- 
bred Roan Shorthorn Bull. R. 
H. Shinkle, Route 25, 2'i miles 



South of Walton. 



*L 



2t-12* 



FOR SALE— 9 year old hbrse, 
weight. 1500 lbs.; 6 year old 
mare .weight 1300 lbs. These 
will work any place. 3 year old 
Belgin, has been worked some. 
J. H. Tomlin, Walton, Route 1, 
(Banklick), Ph. Ind 6252. 3tl2* 



9 Ft. X 100 Ft. Tobacco Canvas 



$7.25 



Mineral Feeders, Wood Construction | 9 60 

Electric Fence Controllers ' gj« qc 

Galvanized Fountains, 5 gallon « 2 30 

Flock Feeders, Wood Construction $3 29 

Heavy Duty Wood Wheel Wagons __ $ % m 

Complete Assortment GARDEN SEEDS and GARDEN 

VIGORO FERTILIZER 



SEARS, ROEBUCK AND CO. 



13 West Seventh Street 



FARM FOR SALE— 94 acres, 3 
miles N. of Walton, across from 
the Kinsington Lake from U. 
S. 25 — 8-room house with 
electricity and piped for water, 
2 good barns— land rolling to 
level, fertile and well watered 
and fenced— 3 and 6 • tenths 
tobacco base. 'Will sell in two 
tracts. G. H. Moore, Phone Wal. 
516. lt-12* 



8 ACRES CHICKEN FARM— 
Level land, on main highway, 
modern home, modern up-to- 
date equipment, double deck 
chicken houses. 

7 ACRES on Highway, 7 room 
house, barn, electric in house, 
bus at door. $2750. 

51 ACRES — 25 miles out, good, 
bldgs., elect. $2700. 

80 ACRES— 15 miles out, nice 5- 
room house, barn, tenant house, 
elect, near house. $5500. 

124 ACRES — 12 miles out, 6-room 
housje, 3 cisterns, 2 wells, dairy 
barn, tenant house, on good 
road, one mile from State High- 
way. $4500. 

17 ACRES — On Taylor Mill, 7 
miles out. Bldg. needs repair, 
nice land, will located. $4500. 

17 ACRES —On LLL Highway, 
near Nicholson. 8 room house, 
out bldgs., nice land. $6000. 

68 ACRES — Near ' Independence, 
6 room house and barn, most 
tractor land. 

59 ACRES— Kenton Co., on good 
road, electric in all bldgs., good 
6 room house, large barn, mod. 
chicken houses, sanitary milk 
house, double corn crib, possess- 
ion now. $5900. 

60 ACRES— Near Union, nice 4- 
room cottage, -good barn, elec. 
in all bldgs. $5250. 

95 ACRES — Near airport, most 
level, 5-room house and barn, 
on State road. $10,000. 

54 ACRES— Near Burlington, rich 
level land, fenced, nice woods, 
modern, new up-to-date English 
shingle, 5 room home. This is 
worth seeing, nothing like it. 
$8000. 

CAMPBELL COUNTY 

39 A., near Silver Grove, nice 5 
room house, in No. 1 condition, 
large barn, 2 chicken houses, 
garage, fenced, on a good road, 

electric in bldgs. $6800. 

20 A., Licking, ' concreate road, 
stone house, electric. $2000. 

180 A. dairy farm, good bldgs., 
electric, 2 sets of bldgs. Will sell 
all or part. 

REL C. WAYMAN 

623 Washington St., Cov., Ky. 
HEmlock 5107 - Ind. 5064 




OLD TIME SQUARE DANCE 



AT 



KENTON FISHING LAKES 

EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT 



The Blue Star Band Will Play Every Saturday Nite 




NOTICE TO FARMERS 

WE HAVE TWO BULDOZER'S IN THE 

WALTON AND VERONA 

NEIGHBORHOOD 

DIGGING PONDS 

To contact the operators, call Vest & Bartell's 
Office and reverse the charges 



Jefferson 0176 







Walton Perpetual* Bldg. & Loan Assn. 



DIXIE STATE BANK BLDG. WALTON, KY. 

E. S. West, Sec'y A. M. Edwards, Pre*. 

SEMI-ANNUAL^DIvTDENDS 




Sears Farm Store 



720 Washington Street 



Covington 



Covington 



Werfhave moved our Cream Buying Station to the 
v^ room in Mr. Simpson's Feed Store formerly 

occupied by Daisy V. Hill. We began *-~ 
M testing here Saturday, Feb 5th. * 

BRING US YOUR CREAM, AND SEE MR. 
SIMPSON FOR FEED. 

YOUR PATRONAGE WILL BE APPRECIATED 

Viola H. Roberts 



DEAD STOCK REMOVED FREE 

For Prompt Removal of Horses and Cows 
• CALL VALLEY 0887 

WE PAY THONE CHARGES 

Ky. Dead Animal Disposal Co. 



LOCKLAND 



«*, 




From where I sit . . . 



6y Joe Marsh 



Jeb Cjrowell and I took the bus 
to town the other day and a 
friend of ours asked us to go 
with him to his Club luncheon 
and hear a prominent college 
president speak. 

He made a mighty sensible talk 
on Peace after the War, point- 
ing out in particular that you 
can't readjust things after 
Victory's won just by making 
laws! Most countries, he said, 
will have to work out their post- 
war problems themselves. 

To emphasize his point, he re- 
minded us how we Americans 
once thought we could keep 
folks from enjoying a moderate 



i. 



[lass of beer, by legislation. And 
tow we got fooled, bad. 

Jeb and I agreed he was exactly 
right. You can't cram law* down 
folks' throat*, especially if they 
interfere with their "right*". 

From where I sit, moderate 
folks ought to be able to sit 
down and enjoy a friendly bev- 
erage like beer— with a home- 
cooked meal, in the company of 
friends, if they want to. I'm a 
great believer in moderation. 



• ism, mw ii w m u m im nx Tw* . Kentucky comhtto 



CJnlversary of Ky. Library 
LEXINGTON KY 



£U 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



— NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER — 
D«otad To th. Into... of Boon., Kenton, (Matin ^ <W CWu^^ton-OmpWl Courier Con«,K<Ut«l With the Adverts 



Subscription $1.50 Per Year In Adva 



nee 



Red Cross Drive 
To Start In Boone 
County March 1st 



On March 1st the largest Red 
Cross Drive In history will be 
started in this country, with a 
goal of two hundred million 
dollars: Boone County's quota has 
been set at S8.70O.0O, and plans 
are i now being made by the 
County Chairman, Irvin Rouse, to 
meet it. 

When it is considered that 
Boone County has about 950 boys 
In the Services, and that if ten 
dollars were collected for each 
boy, the quota would be more 
than obtained, it seems it should 
be done. Surely Boone County 
would not want any one of its 
boys to feel there was not ten 
dollars worth on interest in him 
at home. 

Last year Boone County's 
quota was $4,300.00, but because 
of unprecedented responsibilities, 
due to the War, our quota is more 
than doubled. This means each 
individual subscription must be 
doubled too. Start now to prepare 
to meet this obligation. 

Among other services, your Red 
Cross helps servicemen with per- 
sonal problems, sends food parcels 
to war prisoners, aids service 
families and disabled veterans, 
operates service clubs overseas, re- 
cruits Army and Navy nurses, 
handles emergency messages for 
servicemen and families, collects 
life saving blood, provides com- 
forts, cheer and recreation in 
hospitals, makes surgical dress- 
ings, and helps when disaster 
strikes at home. 



WALTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, February mh. 1944 




Model Food Store Purchased By 
Tom Sebree of Parkersburg, 
West Virginia. % 



Mr. Tom Sebree of Parkersburg, 
W. Va., has purchased the Model 
Pood Store from Mr. Chipman 
and took possession Monday 
morning, February 14th. 

Mr. Sebree has been with 
KrOger Stores for the past 15 
years. 

He expects to bring his wife and 
son to make their home here as 
soon as a location can be found. 

Mrs. Breeden,, Elden demons 
and Bobbie Noe will continue to 
be employed by Mr. Sebree in the 
grocery. 



Rural Youth Day 
To Be Held At 
Florence School 



Million Dollar 
Tobacco Crop 
To Be Discussed 



Second Lieutenant Clifford L. 
Surface has graduated from 
Blackland Flying School, Waco, 
Texas and is now spending his 
ten day leave with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Surface, his 
brothers and sister and other re- 
latives and friends. 



.Boone County's 1943 million 
dollar tobacco crop will be dis- 
cussed in a meeting at Burlington 
Friday evening, February 25, at 
7:45 P. M., according to H. R. 
Forkner, County Agent. Russell 
Hunt, tobacco specialist from the 
College, will advise with farmers 
attending the meetings, on ways 
and means of securing higher 
yields and higher quailty leaf 
from the 1944 crop. 

The county, the past year, pro- 
duced more than two million 
pounds of leaf from approximately 
2,350 acres, Growers following 
some of the new fertilizer and 
production recommendations the 
past year produced in excess of a 
ton of high quality leaf per acre. 
This is a goal planned by leading 
farmers cooperating in a number 
of production demonstrations 
planned for this year. 

The meeting on the 25th will be 
one of planning for improved 
practices. All tobacco growers are 
invited to attend. 



Real Estate Changes 



The many friends of Dr. H. F. 
Mann regret to learn of the con- 
tinued serious illness of his father, 
E. L. Mann of Crittenden. 



E. P. DeMoisey 



E. P. DeMoisey, passed away 
Tuesday night at his home in 
Covington. 

Funeral services will be held 
Friday , 2 p. m. at the Allison and 
Rose funeral home in Covington. 

Mr. DeMoisey was a former 
resident of Walton, and a brother 
of Rev. R. F. DeMoisey. 



Mr. and Mrs. Ott Elliott have 
purchased the home on Chambers 
Avenue formerly owned by Mrs. 
Bess Johnson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Omer Delker, who 
are now living in the property 
bought by Mr. and Mrs. Elliott, 
expect to move to the John Con- 
rad home on Edwards Ave., So. 
Walton in the near future. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Conrad 
have bought the property on High 
St. -from the Laws estate. 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Vest of 
Locust St. have sold their property 
to Mr. and Mrs. Z. A. Works of 
Verona. 



Clear Visiqp 




This, and follownig articles, 
which will be in the news weekly 
for the next several weeks, will be 
addressed especially to the Youth 
of Boone County. We hope that 
any parents who read this article 
will call attention to It to Iheif 
children who are 12 years of age 
or older. 

Realizing that the world of to- 
morrow will be run by the young 
people of today, it is the sincere 
desire of many leaders of this 
County that we give to the youth 
of this County all the advantages 
possible, both spiritual and mater- 
ial. Realizing also that- all mater- 
ial gain and wealth and prosperity 
comes from the earth which is the 
Lord's, there must be a direct 
connection between things spirit- 
ual and things material, in order 
to create this feeling of mutual 
understanding, fellowship, and 
unity among the young people of 
our County, a number of the lead- 
ers of the County are endeavor- 
ing on Saturday, March 25th, to 
gather all the young people of 
our County together at the Flor- 
ence School beginning at 9:30 in 
the morning, for the purpose of 
holding a Rural Youth Confer- 
ence, at which time we will dis- 
cuss the following subjects under 
competent and trained leader- 
ship: 

1. The Spiritual, Cultural, and 
Physical advantages of living 
on a Farm. 

2. The Priceless Heritage of 
Farm Youth. 

3. Rural Life versus City Life. 

4. Cooperation of Federal and 
State Agriculture Agencies as 
a means to a Democartic 
Way of Life. 

5. Means toward a Good and 
Happy Life on the Farm. 

' 6. Conservation and Wild Life. 

7. What the Farm Youth Needs 
and Wants. 

Under these headings each 
young person will have opportun- 
ity to express himself or herself 
as to .what they feel would be the 
best solution to the subject. 

We ask for sincere cooperation 
of every organization in our 
Coutny,— the Church, the 4-H 
Clubs, the Boy Scouts, the Girl 
Reserves, the High-Y, the Parent- 
Teacher Associations, the Home- 
makers Clubs, the Utopia Club, 
the Schools, and all other organ- 
izations that are interested in 
giving our Youth a better under- 
standing and encouragement in 
facing the world of tomorrow. Let 
us not forget the date — Saturday, 
March 25, the time 9:30 A. M., 
the place, Florence School. 

Young folks— this is for you! 
The cost — ^nothing. So let's talk 
it up. 



WASTE PAPER REMINDER 

"Keep this publication." Do 
not burn or destroy it. Sell it 
or give it to a salvage organ- 
ization or a charity. It is need* 
ed for* victory. 



VOLUME 30— NUMBER IS 



William Thedore Webster 

William Thedore Webster passed 
away at the home of his sister, 
Mrs. Claudia Beholder, Walton 
Ky. Friday, February TTtrTaTter 
a long illness. 

Services were conducted from 
Chambers and Grubbs funeral 
home Sunday, February 13th at 
2 p. m. with Rev. A. K. Johnson 
in charge of the services. A solo 
was rendered by Mr. Barnes, 
accompained at the piano by Mrs. 
Olivia Wills. Burial was in the 
Walton Cemetery. 

Mr. Webster is survived by his 
mother, Mrs. Fannie Webster of 
Independence; four sisters, Mrs. 
Clauda Scholders, , Walton; Mrs. 
Mary Hogan, Hartford, Conn.; 
Mrs. Lolu Sturgeon, Covington, 
Ky.; and Mrs. Martha Readnour, 
Covington, Ky.; there brothers, 
Harvey Webster, Crittenden, Ky.; 
Foster Webster, Independence, 
Ky.; and Arney Webster, Suman, 
Ind. 

Chambers and Grubbs were in 
charge of the arrangements. 



William Gideon Kite 



Walter Vest Farm At Verona 
Purchased By Warsaw Man. 



SEE YOUR WAY. 

Wheather you are socially- 
sighted, business-sighted, or 
simply interested in Seeing take 
care of your eyes. 



Walter D. Vest, Local Walton 
Attorney, reports the sale of his 
290 acre farm, located 3 miles 
•south of Verona on Ky. Highway 
16 to Kenneth Stephens of War- 
saw, Ky. 



William Gideon Kite, widely 
known resident and civic leader of 
Waterloo, Ky., died at his home 
Wednesday, February 9th of a 
heart attack. Mr. Ktie, who was 
70 years old, was a director of the 
Citizens Deposit Bank of Grant, 
Ky. 

He was born and had lived all 
his life in Boone County. For a 
number of years he ran a general 
merchandiseing business which 
was founded.in 1866 by his father, 
a Captain in the United States 
cavalry during the Civil War. 

Mr. Kite, with his son-in-law, 
O. W. Purdy, developed a fine 
herd of registered Jersey cattle. 
He was a leader in the 4-H Club 
movement and started many 
farmers on the road to producing 
better milk and cattle. 

Mr. Kite was an elder of the 
First Christian Church of Belle- 
view. 

He is survived by his daughter, 
Mrs. Jeanetta Lea Purdy, and her 
four children, Jean Keyes, Nellie 
Johanna, Lesta Elizabeth and By- 
ron David Purdy. 

Funeral services were held at 
11 o'clock Saturday at First 
Christian Church, Belleview. Rev. 
Samuel Hamilton was in charge 
of the services. Burial was in the 
family cemetery at Burlington, 
Ky. 

Chambers and Grubbs were in 
rharge of the funeral arrange- 
ments. 



Boone County 4-H 
Home Economic 
Projects Organized 



Organization of 4-H Home 
Economics projects for 1944 is 
almost completed, according to 
Mary Hood Gillaspie, Home De- 
monstration Agent. Eleven 4-H 
clubs have groups of girls taking 
clothing, foods, canning and labor 
service projects. Girls in four 
clubs plan to take room improve- 
ment. 

Clothing classes have been 
started in Grant, Verona, Hamil- 
ton and Petersburg. Adlut leaders 
selected by the local club will 
meet weekly with project groups 
until the close of school. 

Any girl between the ages of 9 
and 21 may take one or more 4-H 
projects. The only requirements 
of membership are that members 
complete their project and turn in 
some type of simple written re- 
ports at the end of the 4-H year. 
Following are clubs and leaders 
who ha vev_ completed their or- 
ganization:- Grant, True Blues- 
Mrs. Lillian Scott, Mrs. Hugh Mc- 
Arhur, Mrs. Martha Wolfe, Mrs. 
Laura Frances Rogers, Mrs. Ed- 
ward Rogers and Mrs. Allen 
Rogers; Hamilton— Mrs. J. c. 
Acre; Petersburg— Mrs. George 
Jarboe and Mrs. Hazel White; 
Verona-^Mrs. Walter King, Mrs. 
Lelia Wasson and Mrs. Elena 
Hamilton; and Constance — Mrs. 
Thomas Kenyon. 



Local Blood Donors 



bl 



©se from Walton who gave 
at Williamstown Tuesday | 
and Wednesday were Mrs. Ethel 
Breeden, Mrs. Myrtle Carlisle 
Mrs. Mabel Webster, Mrs. Dei;& 
Northcutt, Mrs. Katie Hankinson 
Mrs. Edith Percival, Mrs. With 
Stephenson. Mrs. Viola Wynn 
Mrs. Ora Berkshire, Mrs. Robert: 
Ducheimen, Mrs. Grace Hanks 
Mrs. Jesse Pruett, Mrs. Nanni 
Bird Elliott, Mrs. Lillie Chapmai. 
Mrs. Jane Johnson, Mrs. Ehaabei. 
Robinson, Mrs. Eva Brittenhelm 
Miss Goldie Bobbins, Cliffon. 
Pruett, Ward Rice, James Smith 
Powers Conrad, Kerfue Brewe 
Hobart Griffith, James Noe an 
Wendell McCubbin. 



Boone County 
Exceeds Quota In 
4th Bond Drive 



Protein Feed 
Scheduled For 
Delivery 



Mr. Geo. P. Nicholson arid Mr. 
Mark Benson were in Ft. Thomas 
Monday to 'see their grandson, 
Charles Benson who was ill in 
the Army Hospital. Pfc. Benson 
is stationed in California and was 
home on a furlough, visiting his 
wife, daughter Keren Sue, his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Ben- 
son and other relatives when 
taken sick. He is improving nicely 
tod expects to return to Calif, 
soon. 



Boone County farmers a; 
scheduled to receive their firs 
cooperatively ordered carload o. 
■cottonseed meal this week, ac 
cording to H. R. Forkner, Count 
Agent. The carload of approxi 
mately thirty tons of cottonsee 
has been ordered by forty far 
mers, and marks the first carloa, 
of protein feeds available to loce 
farmers since the start of thi 
winter feeding period. A part o 
a car load was received about fcw* 
months ago. 

Protein feeds in the form o 
soybean meal, cottonseed mea 
and tankage have not been avail- 
able on local markets for manj 
months. The present delivery wal 
ordered thru , the County AAA 
Committee from allotments madt 
by the War Food Administration 
Farmers who may need additiona, 
protein conscentrates should fik 
their orders with the county AAA 
Committee. 



Paper Collection 



Saturday morning (weather 
permitting) please have your 
papers tied in bundles and 
placed at the curb in front of 
your home for the truck to 
collect. 



Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Ashcraft 
attended the funeral of Mr 
Chester Roland of Owenton, Ky 
Tuesday afternoon. Mr. Rolanc 
was Superintendent of the Owen 
County R. E. A. A splendid youn^ 
man of only 34 years. He died 
suddenly of double pneumonia 
while on the way to the hospital 
in Lexington. 



At the close of business last 
Friday night, (Saturday being a 
holiday) total subscriptions to 
the Fourth War Loan Drive 
amounted to ♦364. 066.25, which 
was aproximaptely $136,00 short 
of Boone County's quota ofv$500,- 
000, with Beaver, Belleview, Bur- 
lington, Petersburg and Hebron- 
Bullittsvllle announcing over the 
top. 

All day long Monday and Tues- 
day of this week the telephone 
wires were kept busy urging the 
precinct chairmen and their 
workers to make an extra effort 
to raise this I shortage. Walton, 
Florence and Constance announc- 
ed Tuesday that their quotas had 
raised and with some over sub- 
scription in many precincts it can 
be stated that all precincts are 
over the top and Boone County- 
has again met the "Call of our 
Country". 

When the news went out Mon- 
day morning that Boone County 
was short $136,000 of its quota, 
several business firms of Coving- 
ton, who are interested in Boone 
County and who receive business 
from this section, allocated over 
$50,000 of their subscription to 
this county just in case we needed 
it. The County Chairman also re- 
ceived a wire from Louisville 
stating that they had allocated . 
$15,000 to us and were prepared 
to give us more if we needed it in 
raising our quota. While it deve- 
loped that we did not need this 
help it was a magnanimous ges- 
ture on the part of these men who 
feel an interest in Boone County 
and its .people. By these outside 
allocations it is now predicited 
that our County's quota will be 
exceeded by close to $100,000. 

A more detailed report will 
appear in this paper next week. 



Mrs. Lee Sleet 



LETTER FROM NEW GUINEA 



The following interesting letter 
was received by Mrs. Robert G. 
Robinson of Walton Rural" Route 
2, from her nephew, Pfc. Walter 
E. Bugg who is stationed some- 
where in New Guenea. 



Registered livestock Offered 
For Sale At Vest-Jones Sale. 



WALTON-VERONA SCHOOL 
NEWS 



DR. J. O. TYSON 

. Optometrist 
OFFICES WITH 

MOTCH 

Optician — Jewelers 

613 MADISON AVE. COVINGTON, KY. 

Established 1857 



Families Invited 
To Send Messages 
To Marines 



Your Marine — son, husband, 
brother, boy friend or buddy is 
just a fraction of a second away 
down in the South Pacific. 

Something important happen 
in the family? A visit from the 
stork? Or maybe you'd like to 
cheer him with just a word of the 
common place at home? 

"Tell It To The Marines" win 
get the message to him out there 
in the vastness known as "some- 
where in the South Pacific" and 
in double quick time. 

"Tell It To The Marines" is the 
Leathernecks' own individually 
styled short wave braodcast to its 
own men in that area. The pro- 
gram is now nearing its 300th 
time on the airways. 

Relatives and trends of Marines 
in the South Pacific may send 
personal messages on this short 
wave broadcast. The greetings are 
free, but thy must not contain 
more than 100 words. 

Messages should be sent to the 
Public Relations Officer, U. S. 
Marine Corps, 1 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco, California. Full 
name and address of the sender 
must be Included. 



On Thursday evening, Feb. 24th 
at 7:30 the Walronian Players 
will present a comedy entitled, 
"Thanks Awfully". 

The cast includes: Richad Mon- 
tague, a woman hater, Jack 
Rouse; Dorothy Montagus, his 
sister, Colleen Vallandingham; 
Marion Gatewood, "the girl", 
Carol Kendall; Ann Marsh, Mar- 
ion's friend, .Glenna Northcutt; 
Carol Barton, Dorothy Kannady; 
Edith Crane, Virginia demons; 
Mrs. Dodd, Jeanette Grubbs; Mrs. 
Smythe, Wanda Dixon; Enid 
Houston, Marjorie Carpenter; 
Nanette, Carrington, Beverly 
Pruett; Mrs. Hemingway, Emma 
Lou McElroy; o Mrs. James Gower, 
Laura Mae Whitson; Caroline | generally taller, 



Barton, Lois Mayhugh and Jane 
Van Sickle, Peggy Vest. 

This play will be presented in 
the Walton Auditorium, together 
with one by the Sejunso Players 
entitled "Extra". 

The cast includes: Miss And a 
Due, sob-sister, Ruth Dearlng; 
Henry Heningway, reporter, 
Donald Ransom^Jffilary Wets, 
club reporter, Vw»on Myers; 
Elaine Evans, a pretty girl, Mar- 
garet Hanks; Alebrt McNaughton, 
managing editor, Guy Olen Car- 
lisle; Flora Grade of the upper 
(?) class, Joan Farris; Tim Shea 
a plain clothes man, Jimmie 
Pennington. 

The price of admission to both 
is thirty cents for adults and 
twenty cents for school children. 



22 January 1944 
My Dear Aunt, 

Will try to write a few lines this 
evening to let you know that I am 
in excellent health and getting 
along O. K. Hope his finds you 
and the family well. I suppose 
you're having lots of cold weather 
these days. As for the weather 
here, it's terrific! I don't know 
what I'll do if it gets any warmer 
here as I'm down to my "shorts" 
now.! Oh well, I can-not complain 
too much, as this is a lot better 
than some of the cold climates 
I've been. in. At least I'm not 
bothered with colds .and coughs. 

There's hardly any news to 
write about this time so will try to 
tell you about the Natives, their 
customs and the jungle in general. 

I know of two kinds of natives; 
the Melanesians — literally, "black 
islanders" and the Papuans (from 
a Malay word meaning "wooly 
haired"). The Melanesians are 
and also lighter 



Walter D. Vest and M. O. Jones 
announce a public auction at the 
farm, located 3 miles south oi 
Verona on Kentucky Highway 16. 
Wednesday, February 3rd at 1(. 
a. m., (CWT). Lunch will be serv- 
ed by the Verona P.-T. A. 

The sale will include 16 pure 
bred Pole-Angus Heifers, 1 regis- 
tered Pole-Angus bull, 4 Holstei:"! 
milk cows, 8 Jersey milk cows, 3" 
ewes, 10 ton baled mixed hay, 
farm implements and other mis- 
cellaneous items. A complete list 
of the sale will be found on page 
eight of this paper. 



Marriage Announced 



Rev. -and Mrs. C. G. Dearinc 
wish to announce the marriage o- 
their son, Sgt. Edward R. Dearin ; 
of Camp Walters, Texas to Miss 
Lena Walker of Jacksboro, Texas 
The wedding was solemnized at 
the Army Chapel on Februar- 
12th at 7:45 P. M. 



Funeral services for Mrs. Lee 
Sleet, wife of Mr. C. C. Sleet of 
South Walton were conducted 
Fiday, February 11th at 11 o'clock 
at Hughes Chapel, where she was 
a faithful member since child- 
hood, having lived in that neigh- 
borhood all of her life until she 
moved to Walton. 

Rev. Simmerman, a former 
pastor was in charge of the ser- 
vices, assisted by Rev. Godbey, the 
pastor, Rev. Dearing and Rev. 
Bedinger of Walton. Rev. and 
Mrs. Cal-oland of the Walton 
Christian Church sang a beautiful 
duet, accompanied at the piano by 
Mrs. Olivia Wills. . 

Burial was in the church 
cemetery. . » ' 

She is survived by her devoted 
husband and loving daughter 
Rebecca, teacher in Walton High 
School and three sisters, Mrs. 
Amelia Britt, Covington; Mrs. 
Pearl Bedinger, Walton and Mrs. 
Anna Hind, Chicago; other relat- 
ives and a host of friends. 

Chambers and Grubbs were in 
charge of the funeral arrange- 
ments. 

The floral tributes were numer- 
ous and beautiful. 



Real Estate News 



The Walton-Verona "Bearcats" 

meet the Florence "Knights" at 

the Walton Gym Friday night at 

7:30 p. m. Admission 20 cents and 

1 30 cents. 



in color, more bushy haired, and 
less heavily featured than the 
Papuans. The Papuans are often 
very short, some actually of 
pygmy size. 

A lot of people think the island- 
ers are cannibals and head- 
hunters, but they're not — that is, 
unless you go deep into some of 
the remotest mountains and 
swamps. The natives look pretty 
wild in some places, but most of 
them are accustomed to govern- 
ment supervision. Many of then- 
old customs remain, of course — 
they are by no means convinced 
that our ways are better than 
theirs. Their life is still a strange 
mixture qt prlmitiveness and 
civilization. 

Some groups of natives are 
trustworthy and dependable; 
others have a tradition of double 
talk and deception in dealing with 
outsiders. Some are clean; some 
are dirty. Some work hard; others 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Reynolds 
have purchased the^-room re- 
sidence on Verona M. from Mr. 
and Mrs. Opal Simpsop: 

Mr. and Mrs. M. O. Jones of 
Veroha^ have acquired the 30 acre 
farm owned by Mr. and Mrs 
Zeke Works. These sales were 
made by A. C. Johnson.- 



Short Feed 
Supply Predicted 
By Specialist 



Mr. and Mrs. O. P. Mann enter- 
tained Monday evening in honor 
of their daughter, Mrs. Jean R 
DeJarnette of Boston, Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank DeJarnette and Mr 
Mrs. Scott Hamilton of Latonia. 



(Oontined on page four) 



Auction Sale 

Rel C. Wayman, 623 Washing- 
ton St., Covington, will conduct a 
public sale at the Ben Bilz place, 
Dudley Pike, near Beacon Light, 
Saturday, February 18. 10 a. m. 

Ten milch cows and other live- 
stock, a considerable number of 
farming tools, household fur- 
niture, Chevrolet truck, etc., will 
be sold. A list of articles will be 
found in an advertisement in this 
issue of The Advertiser. 

Lute Bradford will be the 
auctioneer. 



L. A. Vennes, market specialist 
from the College of Agriculture, 
advised livestock producers in a 
meeting in Burlington Wednesday 
February 9, to expect less feed per 
head of livestock in 1944 and 1945 
unless good crops are produced 
this year. Livestock numbers are 
at record highs and the surplus 
feed supplies of tanner years are 
practically exhausted. 

Boone County farmers normally 
import feed and should make 
every effort this year to produce 
the maximum amount of feed 
needed for their livestock. This 
may mean considerable adjust- 
ment in livestock numbers on 
some farms. 

Danny Welch, sheep salesman 
and Mr. Whistler of the Producers 
Cooperative Livestock Association 
outlined livestock marketing prob- 
lebs of the Cincinnati Livestock 
Market in recent months. A 
special livestock committee was 
appointed to represent the county 
at the Cooperative Livestock Mar- 
keting meeting in Cincinnati on 
February 17th. 






N 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



Thursday, February 17, 1944 




^TT IS not necessary to make our 
*■ economies so dull that they de- 
press every one. Let's make them 
gay and attractive to give us a 
lift and a bit of a challenge too. 
This old rocker is an example, t 
A saw and a wood chisel were 
used for removing projections 
and rockers. An old quilt was 
found for padding and the feathers 




from an old bolster were packed 
into a thick seat cushion to raise 
the seat which has been lowered 
by removing the rockers. This re- 
quired a yard and a quarter oil 
ticking. Four and one-half yards 
of inexpensive chintz in a bold, 
modern pattern did the rest. 
* • * 

NOTE^This remodeled chair is from 
BOOK S which also contains directions 
tor modernizing an old fashioned couch 
and making other home furnishings from 
things on hand. To get copy, of BOOK 8 
■end 15 cents to cover cost of mailing 
direct to: 



WEEKLY NEWS ANALYSIS 



Battle for Italy Grows in Intensity 
As Allies Close on Supply Routes; 
Pacific Sea Lanes to China Cleared 
By U. S. Triumph in Marshall Islands 

(EDITOR'S NOTE: When opinions are expressed In then* columns, they arc those of 
Western Newspaper Union's bows analysts and not necessarily of this newspaper.) 
______^__ Released by Western Newspaper Union. ' 



MRS. RUTH WYETH SPEARS 
Bedford Rills New York 
, — Drawer 10 ■ 



Enclose IS cents for Book No. 5. 

Name , 

Address 



BACK IN GRANDMA'S DAY 

ooldfl often called for medicated mutton 
■uet as a "home remedy" to comfort 
muscle aches, coughing. Today, it's for 
Penetro, modern medication in a base 
containing mutton suet. Penetro's doa- 
ble action relieves these miseries — (1) va- 
porizes to soothe stuffy nose (2) acts like 
warming plaster right where rubbed on. 
26c, Double supply, 36c. Get Penotro. 





Italy — Captured German prisoners are marched through Anzio as 
bitter battle raged for Allied beachhead below Rome. 




AT FIRST 

JIM OF A 



* use 666 

666 TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DROPS 



c 



SNAPPY FACTS 

ABOUT 

RUBBER 




With synthetic tires about to 
be in general use, experts 
emphasize again that speed 
is important in determining 
tire mileage. The legal limit 
of 35 m.p.h. has been found 
to be the best mileage con- 
server with synthetics, just as 
is was with tires of crude 
rubber. 

Tire cords lose elasticity as they 
grow older, which accounts for many 
blowouts when a well .worn tire 
strikes a rough spot in the road. 

Wartime regulations are sav- 
ing nearly 200 million bos 
miles a year for the country's 
highway transportation sys- 
tem. Converted into tires, 
this conserved mileage means 
a lot- to the rubber program. 



JfS+^xjZu***- 



hwmwpeace 



RFGoodrich 



F| RST IN RUBBER 



*H&T 



EUROPE: 

Fight for Rome 

In the coastal plains 18 miles be- 
low Rome, Allied and German forces 
locked in battle fop the Eternal City, 
while farther to the south, Fifth 
army _troops_ closed in on the supply 
lines feeding the enemy -forces re- 
sisting doggedly in the Cassino area. 

While fighting in Italy rose in fury, 
waves of Allied planes thundered 
over Europe, pounding the French 
coast along the English channel to 
soften the Nazis' concrete and steel 
defense emplacements and rip their 
network* of air fields, on which they 
are counting to check invasion 
forces. 

As fighting developed below Rome, 
the Nazis brought up heavy armored 
reinforcements to challenge the big 
Allied army operating along a 30 
mile coastal stretch. Both sides 
threw swarms of planes at each oth- 
er '-s supply lines, with the German 
force demonstrating in strength for 
the first time during the Italian cam- 
paign. 

The Germans' hold on battle- 
scarred Cassino was shaken when 
Fifth army troops worked their way 
toward highways over which sup- 
plies were being fed to enemy forces, 
hanging on near the town, key to* 
the broad plain leading northward 
to Rome. 

RUBBER: 

U. S. Steps From Brazil 

After two years of pioneering deep 
in the stewing Amazon jungle, the 
U. S. is pulling out of rubber grow- 
ing there and leaving the job to 
Brazil, from whom this government 
will purchase the material for .60 a 
pound. 

To help develop an accessible 
source of natural rubber after the 
Japs overran the English and Dutch 
plantations in the east after Pearl 
Harbor, the U. S. decided to rebdild- 
the industry in the Amazon basin, 
once the world's rubber capital and 
producer of the seed which was 
smuggled to the Orient for cheap 
cultivation there about half a cen- 
tury ago. 

Since 1942, the U. S.. spent large 
sums on recruiting workers for the 
steaming rubber districts, transport- 
ing them to. the sites, and maintain- 
ing them there, with equipment, food 
and medicine. As a result, rubber 
cost per pound was supposed to have 
risen to anywhere from $1.22 to $50 
a pound. ' 

POST-OFFICE: 

Profit Shotvn 

A money-maker in the 12 months 
ending last June when it realized a 
profit of $1,332,849 
for the first time in 
24 years, the post 
office department is 
seeing red again 
during the current 
fiscal year. 

Supplied by Post- 
master Frank Walk- 
er to the house 
committee consider- 
ing appropriations 
for the department 
for 1944-'45, figures 
showed that during the 12 months 
ending last June, gross postal rev- 
enues totaled $966,277,288, of which 
$964,894,439 was expended. In addi- 
tion, $122,343,000 of free service for 
soldiers and government agencies, 
was rendered. 

For the fiscal year 1944-'45, the 
house committee recommended an 
appropriation of $1,105,697,583, an in- 
crease of $205,719,248 over the pres- 
ent year. 





PACIFIC: 
China Bound 

,The Pacific sea lanes to China are 
being cleared by U. S. army and 
naval forces for a 
grand assault upon 
Japan from bases in 
that country. Ad- 
miral Chester Nim- 
itz declared in re- 
viewing the quick 
triumph in the Mar- 
shall Islands, where 
over 12,000 enemy 
troops were killed to 
the Americans' 
General Smith 1,600. 

Revealing that U. 
S. policy was "to get our ground and 
air forces into China as early as pos- 
sible*, because "I dojjpt believe we 
can dtfeat Japan from the sea 
alone," Admiral Nimitz said: "I 
believe the Japs can only be de- 
feated from bases in China because 
they draw food, iron -and other sup- 
plies from Manchuria and China, 
and as long as they have access to 
these they will be difficult to beat." 
As Marine Commander MaJ. 
Gen. Holland Smith's troops rung up 
Old Glory over the Marshalls, U. S. 
air forces a&ain hammered the b|# 
Jap base of Rabaul on New' Brit- 
ain, going after airdromes from 
which enemy craft have been taking 
oft* to blast American ground units 
on the western end of the island. 

MEAT SUPPLY: 

Civilians Share 

About 131 pounds of meat will be 
available to every person in the 
U. S. during 1944, and this supply 
might be increased if the govern- 
ment can spare stock's from its 
emergency reserves, the U. S. de- 



Washington, b. o. 
FOOD AND THE WAR 

Assistant President Jimmy Byrnes 
called a meeting of the War Mobili- 
zation committee the other day to 
discuss the vital question of food for 
1944. In preparation for the meet- 
ing, War Food Administrator Mar- 
vin Jones had His staff prepare a 
lengthy report on food prices, farm 
labor, machinery and other phases 
of the farm problem. 

This report was distributed before 
the meeting so that members of the 
War Mobilization committee would 
have time to study it, but It soon be- 
came apparent that genial Judge 
Jones had not read carefully bis 
own report — if at all. 

When he began to talk about the 
drastic need of farm machinery and 
the restrictions on its production, 
WPB's Donald Nelson quickly picked 
him up. Obviously, Nelson had read 
Jones' report and had some facts of 
his own to refute it. . He pointed out 
that the only thing getting a higher 
priority than farm machinery on the 
war production schedule was the 
landing craft program, and that the 
President had ordered landing 
barges placed ahead of everything 
else. * 

"You wouldn't put farm machin- 
ery ahead of landing barges, would 
you?" asked Nelson. 

"Well, it won't do 'em any good to 
land if they haven't got food," re- 
plied Jones. 

■Undersecretary of War Patterson 
also tangled briskly with Jones over 
farm deferments. Patta/son point- 
ed out that there were 750,000 boys 
between 18 and 21 with permanent 
draft deferments because they were 
farmers. 

"This is greater than all the oth- 
er deferments of the entire country," 
said the undersecretary of war, add- 
ing that, while agriculture should be 
In a preferred position, it should not 
be a "haven for draft dodgers." 

"Well, the army's got to have food, 
doesn't it?" replied Jones, 
see 

HOG MERRY-GO-ROUND 

Hog farmers all over the country 
are dizzy over conflicting directives 
from Washington A farmer turns 
on his radio one morning and learns 
that Washington wants him' to feed 
hogs heavy. NtSct, he is asked to 
market them lean. Next, just as he 
is snatching the extra corn from the 
pigs, a hurry call comes from Wash- 
ington to feed 'em fat again. 

Farmers are thinking of staging a 
little satire to express their feelings. 
Entitled "Make Up Your Mind, 
Washington," it has the following 
chorus: 

"How can a man know what you 
mean, 
Whether a hog shall be fat or lean? 
Make up your mind and stick to 

that, 
Whether a hog shall be lean 

or fat!" 
However, the situation is not en- 
tirely the fault of the bureaucrats 



r^*r^«*r^r«»»**r^r^r**^r«»*r^r«v»» 

ggf J SUNDAY 

International II SCHOOL 

■•■ LESSON :• 

By HAROLD L. LUJfDQUIST, D. D. 
Of The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago, 
Released by Western Newspaper Union. 




Lesson for February 20 



Lesson subjects and Scripture texts se- 
lected and copyrighted by International 
Council of Religious Education; used by 
permission. 



JESUS TEACHES TRUE 
GREATNESS 

LESSON TEXT— Mark 9:33-39; 10:13- 
18. 4245. 

JSOLDEN TEXT— The Son of man 
came not to be ministered unto, but to 
minister, and to give ms life a ransom 
for many.— Mark 10:43. 



partment of agriculture announced. 

Reviewing the meat situation, the ^ norm £l times, 225 pounds is a 
department reported that a record good average weight for hogs. The 
25,000,000,000 pounds may be pro- American market likes its bacon 
duced in 1944, even though numbers le!ul - Bu . 4 *°f lend-lease purposes, 
of cattle, hogs and lamb on hand 
were about 15 per cent less than last 
year. The services, lend-lease and 
other U. S. agencies will get the 8 
per cent increase. 

Cattle and calf slaughter in re- 
cent weeks has been, heavier than a 
year ago, and about 46 per cent of 
the animals now on feed are sched- 
uled for marketing by April, the de- 
partment said. 



Frank Walker 



OIL: 

Seek Arabian Reserves 

To relieve the strain on U. S. petro- 
leum supplies which will be called 
upon to furnish the fuel to enable 
the country's military and naval 
forces to help maintain, collective 
security in the postwar world, the 
federal government will co-operate 
with the Standard Oil Company oi 
California, the Texas company and 
the Gulf Oil company in exploitin% 
Arabian oil resources. 

At a cost of approximately 150 
million dollars, the government will 
build a 1,250 mile pipeline which 
will carry the crude from the com- 
panies' fields to the Mediterranean 
coast, with the companies repay 
ing the principal cost plus interest 
within 25 years. The companies 
would maintain a crude oil reserve 
of 20 per cent of the total field for 
the government and sell to it below 
the market price. 

Since the consent of Saudi Arabia 
and smeller Kuwait would be need- 
ed before work could start, Senatoi 
Moore (Okla.) said the agreement 
would amount to a treaty affecting 
relations between the peoples of the 
U. S. and the countries concerned, 
thus requiring Senate approval. 



HIGHLIGHTS 



in the week'* news 



HOUSING: Two million new 
homes will be needed immediately 
after the war to take care of mar- 
ried servicemen and families that 
have doubled up during the conflict. 
John Blandford, administrator of 
the National Housing agency, told 
the Associated General Contractors. 
Other new houses will be needed at 
the rate of 600,000 a year for re- 
placements, he said. 



CANNED MILK: Civilians will 
getslightly less condensed and evap- 
orated milk this year than last, the 
War Food administration an- 
nounced. An allotment of 1,740,000,000 
pounds of evaporated, and 190,700,- 
000 pounds of condensed milk has 
been made from stock estimated at 
3,562,200,000 pounds total, Militarj 
supplies were increased to 939,800, 
000,000 pounds. 



extra production was required, espe- 
cially to supply lard for the Soviets. 
So farmers were implored to feed 
to heavy weights. 

Came the^orn shortage, and farm- 
ers were implored to stop feeding, 
market their hogs, and release the 
corn for shipment to dairy and poul- 
try areas. Each change was im- 
plemented by shifts in the federal 
price supports. 

But the hog run became phenom- 
enal. January's slaughter broke all 
records. Hogs became a glut on 
the market. Farmers couldn't get 
near the slaughter houses. They 
had to keep on feeding. Hogs auto- 
matically got heavier, at the rate of 
13 pounds a week. 

But if they got over 300 pounds, 
they passed the support level, and 
the packers docked them. Fearing 
to lose money, farmers jammed 
their hogs into market channels, and 
the run became chaotic, 

So now Washington has swung 
back again, and is inviting farm- 
ers to feed to heavier weights. The 
support price has been extended to 
330 pounds. 

Note: Probably no decision of War 
Food administration was made with 
greater reluctance, and the support 
price will be reduced again as soon 
as the hog run tapers off. 

* V 

MERRY-GO-ROUND 

C. Washington real estate agents are 
evading price ceilings by requiring 
new tenants to decorate apartments 
at their own expense ... To pack 
'em in tighter, a Washington bus 
driver called out, "Push to the back, 
folks, and get together like you were 
in church." 

C Ed Stettinius, undersecretary of 
state, discovered that ambassadors 
returning to Washington had no 
space in the state department build- 
ing. With one phone call, he fixed 
up a suite of six rooms. 
C Sen. Ralph Brewster of Maine, a 
dry, used to have a hard time re- 
fusing drinks at capital cocktail par- 
ties. "But now," he says, "with liq- 
uor so scarce, I'm the most popular 
man at the party 1" 
ft British embassy officials, mind- 
ful of food and liquor shortages here, 
are avoiding the usual diplomatic 
entertaining. 



Ambition to be great is not wrong 
— provided one has a proper "Con- 
ception of greatness, and seeks it 
in a right way. Every one of us 
should be our very best, not for 
selfish reasons, but for God's glory. 

The disciples were earnest and 
eager to have a place of honor with 
the Lord in glory, but even in that 
holy purpose they became selfish and 
argumentative. Jesus gives several 
marks of a truly great man. 

Greatness Means Being — 

I. Not First, but Last (9:33-35) 
The way of the world is to seek 

the place of "No. 1 man"— to be 
looked up to, honored, and served 
by elL True greatness takes the last 
place, the place of a servant; and lo, 
God regards that as the first place. 
It is not a question of timid dif- 
fidence, or self-effacement, but a 
willingness to take the humble place 
in order to serve all. 

II. Not Proud, but Humble (9:36, 
37). , 

"Great" people of this world have 
no time for children. Let them be 
cared for by servants, teachers, any- 
one at all, but not by their ''distin- 
guished" parents. 

But Jesus said that the one who 
set aside human pride and received 
a child with humility of heart and 
mind — and in His name — received 
the Lord who gave them life— spir- 
itual as, well as physical— and is in- 
terested in them; in fact. He is with 
them and hence when we receive 
them in His name, He is there 1 

III. Not Exclusive, but Co-opera- 
tive (9:38, 39). 

John, quick to apprehend spiritual 
truth, saw in the teaching of Christ 
concerning the little child the con- 
demnation of something he had 
done. 

The man who casts out demons, 
or who gives the disciple of Jesus a 
cup of water, in His name— that is, 
with true faith in Christ, and in His 
power, and for His glory — must be a 
believer. He may not belong to our 
group or circle, he may not speak 
our language, he may not use our 
methods, but if he is serving Christ 
we should not forbid him or speak 
evil of him. You *and I may not 
like one another's appearance, or 
voice, or methods, but let us love 
and co-operate with one another for 
Christ's sake! 

IV. Not Important, bat Approach- 
able (10:13-16). 

Some who think they are great, 
pride themselves on being hard to 
reach— protected from the rabble 
and their problems by secretaries 
and servants. 

The disciples had built up such an 
Idea of the importance of Christ in 
their own minds. He had never giv- 
en them any ground for it either 
by word or deed. 

So. the man who is truly great fol- 
lows in the Master's footsteps. He 
is approachable, kind, has time for 
simple folk and little children. If 
that isn't true of a man he is not 
great— no matter what he may think 
of himself or what others may say 
about him. 

V. Not a Supervisor, bnt a, Servant 
(10:42-44). 

Christianity is not organized after 
the manner of secular government 
(v. 42). Much of the mischief that 
has come to pass in the church is 
the result of "running the church" 
as an organization, when it should 
be allowed to develop as a living 
organism. 

The way up is down. .That is al- 
ways true in the spiritual realm. 
The Son of man came not to be 
ministered unto but to minister, yea, 
to give His very life (v. 45). Shall 
not those who bear His name walk 
the same path of humble self-denial? 

Anyone who observes with even a 
little care knows that the church oi 
Jesus Christ is hindered most seri- 
ously by the presence of pride and 
selfish ambition. Some people will 
not work unless they can rule. 

Are there then no Christians who 
humbly serve the Lord? Yes, praise 
His name, there are many, and 
wherever they are found they an 
the salt of the earth. 

VI. Not Unselfish, bnt Sacrificial 
(10:45). 

The world is full of people who 
want to be served Their little per- 
sonalities swell with pride and 
pleasure if someone else cringes and 
bows, and serves. 

There is nothing commendable 
about being served. The great and 
good thing is to serve. 

The Son of man— Himself the Lord 
of glory, the One who might have 
called legions of angels to do His 
will— came "not to be ministered 
unto but to minister." That service 
meant going about doing good even 
when He was exhausted and worn. 
But it meant far more than that, for 
it took Him to the cross where He 
gave "his life a ransom" for us. 
Are we ready to learn of Him? 



A HANDSOME, inexpensive, ca- 
*♦ pacious knitting bag made of 
burgundy and turquoise mercer- 
ized cotton thread — it will hold all 
your knitting and can double as a 
shopping bag! Crochet it all in 




' 1 WAS CONSTIPATED 
FOR MANY YEAHSi 

Now I'm 'Regular' Every 
Morning!" 



one piece— the bag measures 17 
by 41 inches— attach it to two 
wooden rods— sew on the handles 
and the bag is finished and ready 
for usel 

e e e 

To obtain complete crocheting Instruc- 
tions for the Striped Knitting Bag (Pat- 
tern No. 5674) send 16 cents in coin, your 
name and address and the pattern num- 
ber. 

Due to an unusually large demand and 
current war conditions, slightly more time 
is required in filling orders for a few of 
the most popular pattern numbers. 

Send your order to: 

HOME NEEDLEWORK 

530 Sooth Wells St. Chicago. 



Constipated? Then here's an un- 
solicited letter you'll want to read : 

"I'd been troubled with common consti- 
pation for many years. Was taking laxa- 
tives and pills all the time, and feeling 
very weak and run down. 8 months agoTI 
besran eating KELLOGG'S ALL-BRAN 
dally. Now. I have a regular, natural 
movement every morning, which helps ma 
feel my lest 1" Mr. Samuel D. Blank. 29a 
Klnir« i Highway. Brooklyn, New York. 

What is this seeming magic of 
KELLOGG'S ALL-BRAN? Scien- 
tists say it's because KELLOGG'S 
ALL-BRAN can really "get at? 
a common cause of constipa- 
tion — namely, lack of sufficient 
"cellulosic" elements in the diet. 
KELLOGG'S ALL-BRAN is one 
of Nature's most effective sources 
of these elements, which help the 
friendly colonic flora fluff up 
and prepare the colonic wastes 
for easy, natural elimination. 
KELLOGG'S ALL-BRAN is not 
a purgative! Doesn't work by 
"sweeping out." It's a gentle-act- 
ing, "regulating" food I 

if you have constipation of thui 
type, eat KELLOGG'S ALL- 
BRAN or several ALL-BRAN 
muffina regularly. Drink plenty of 
water. See if you don't find lasting 
relief! Insist on genuine ALL- 
BRAN, made only by Kellogg's in 
Battle Creek. 




Tou breathe freer al- 
most Instantly as just 
2 drops Penetro Noso 
Drops open your cold- 
clogged nose to give 



your head cold air. 
Caution: Use only aa 
directed. 25c, 2Vj tunes 
as much for 60c. Get 
Penetro Nose Drops 





Make left-over rice into cakes, 

fry in bacon fat and serve with 

maple syrup for breakfast, 
e e • 

Cellar windows should be opened 
frequently to purify the atmos- 
phere of the cellar' and entire 
dwelling. 

e • e 

Texture of griddle cakes will be 
finer if the eggs are separated 
and the whites are beaten and add- 
ed last to the batter. 

• • e 

Paint the bottom step of your 

cellar stairs white so it may be 
easily seen and prevent falls. 

.0-0 

If wool clothes get wet or mud- 
dy, dry them slowly at room tem- 
perature (pever close to a stove or 

radiator).. "When dry, brush them. 

• ♦ e 

Children's glossy paper picture 
books will give much greater serv- 
ice if you treat each page to a 
coat of clear shellac. This helps 
prevent tearing. Pages may be 
cleaned with a damp cloth. 



Large Islands 

There are six islands in the 
world each - larger in area than 
Great Britain. ' 



FALSE TEETH 

AND A 
GRAND SMILE! 



LAUGH, EAT, TALK, FREE* 
OF EMBARRASSMENT 

It's so easy to enjoy all- 
day confidence when 
, your plates axe. held in place by this 
"comfort cushionj'adentist'sforrnula. 
I. Dr. Wernet's vent sore gums. 
Powder lets you a. Economical; 
enjoy solid foods, small amount 
avoid embarrass- lasts longer, 
ment of loosens. Pure, harmless, 
plates. Helps pre* pleasant tasting. 
AllthigghhSOi. AfoMyboci It—KUaUtd 



H. Dr. Wernet's Powder 

LARGEST SELLING PLATE 
POWDER IN THE WORLD 



RHEUMATIC PAIN 

Reed ast Seoll -sir Bs»— fit alter It Hew 
Don't put off getting C-2223 to re- 
lieve pain of muscular rheumatism 
and other rheumatic pains. Caution: 
Use only as directed. First bottle 
purchase price back if not satisfied. 
60o and $1.00. Today, buy C-2223. 



TABASCO 

The snappiest seasoning known, and 
the world's most widely distributed 
food product I A dash of this piquant 
sauce ftives ■ rare flavor to any food. 
TABASCO— the seasoning secret of 
master chefs for more than 75 years I 



rtfif&fi&S^t^'-: : "i ' 






you ACT 

LIKE AN 
OLD MAN 
TODAY!" 



4 



.\iXiiteiiV ■ ' itok. 



i»fc!3 



m^ v 



HOW LOW, discouraged, they can 
I make yon feel— those nagging mus- 
cle aches. In Soretone Liniment 
yon get the benefit of methyl sali- 
cylate, a most effective pain-reliev- 
ing agent. And Soretone's cold heat 
action brings yon fast, so-o-o-thing 
relief. Soretone Liniment acts to:— 

1. Dilate surface capillary blood 
vessels, 

2, Check muscular cramps. 
S, Enhance local circulation, 
4. Help reduce local swelling. 

For fastest action, let dry, rub fa 
again. There's only one Soretone— 
insist on it for Soretone results. 
50*. A big bottle, only f 1. 



MONEY BACK 

IF SORETONE DOESN'T SATISFY 



*and McKesson makes W* 



SORETONE 

soothes fast with ; 

COLD HEAT* 
ACTION 

in cotes of 

MUSCULAR LUMBAGO 
OR BACKACHE 

ess to fatties ar Ssws s m 

MUSCULAR PAINS 

Set to sties 

SORE MUSCLES 

set tesvarvtrk 

IMINOR SPRAINS 



♦ Thouih applied cold, rube- 
fadant liurredlenu in San- 
toot act like beit to Increase 
Uil luperfidel supply at 
blood to the ana and Indue* 
a slowing state of i 



H B HDB IBbBBs Bs B9 Bl BBSBH 



THURSDAY FfcB. 17th, 1944 



WALNUT LICK 

(Delayed) 



Miss Nina Jane Olacken of 
ErlanRer was visiting her parent*, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Olacken Fri- 
day. 

Mrs. Flonnie Bdrlngton was 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



calling on Mrs. Olthea Craft and 
mother-Friday afternoon. 

Pvt, William Olacken was call- 
ing on his parents Friday before 
leaving for his camp Sautrday. 

We were sorry to hear of the 
death of Mrs. Jo . Ann Webster, 
who passed away at her home 




AUCTION 
SALE 

1 HAVE SOLD MY FARM AND WILL SELL AT 
AUCTION ON THE VERONA ROAD, HALF 
MILE FROM WALTON, ON 

Sat., Feb. 19 

AT 1:00 P.M. 

2 Good Work Hones; 3 Good Milk Cow.; 3 
Shoats; 1 Disc Harrow; 1 Road Wagon; One 2- 
Horse Sled; ^ Uying-Off How; 1 Chill Plow; 1 
Jersey Cow, 4 years old, catf by ride; 1 Pair Sorrel 
Colts, 3 years old, these colts are* well matched; 
2000 Tobacco Sticks; some Household Goods and 
a lots of other articles too numerous to mention. 

Z. A. Works 



near Pleasant View Church at 
Zion Station Sunday night. We 
extend sympathy to her grand 
daughter and other relatives. 

Mrs. Iris Hughes was calling on 
her parents Tuesday afternoon. 

James Lee Allphin of the Navy 
is home on a furlough. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Beach and 
children were calling on Mrs. 
Beach sister, Mr. and Mrs. Russell 
Webster of Munk. Mrs. Webster is 
still on the sick list. 

Harold Vaugh, of Great Lakes 
Naval Training Station is home 
on a furlough. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Edrington 
and James Whitson were visiting 
Mrs. Edrington's sister, Mr. and 
Mrs. Hobart Greenwell of Erlang- 
er Saturday in the afternoon, 
they drove out to the new airport 
near Burlington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Hughes 
were business visitors in Warsaw 
Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Manford Craft 
and daughter Barbara and Mrs. 
Emma Willeford were visiting at 
the W. N. Robinson home after 
Sunday School Sunday. 



MT. ZION 

(Delayed) 



Next Saturday night we will 
have our second Two-For-One 
Prayer Meeting. In this prayer 
meeting each person represents 
one of the boys in the service and 
themselves. Won't the parents 
represent their son or some other 
boy as they will not want to be left 
out In this representation. Let us 
remember the boys as they should 
be remembered. 

- Five of our boys passed the 
examination at Cincinnati Thurs- 
day; Harry Lee Anderson, Cam- 
den Webster and John Lawrence 
for the Naval Reserve and Buford 
Kennedy and Hobart Lee McClure 
for the Army. 



GOSHEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Plner, Kentucky 



>' 



OWNER 

H. F. Johnson, Auctioneer— Phone bid. 6196 

J. B. Doan, Clerk 



Cecil F. MeKee, Pastor . 
Services 2nd and 4th Sundays. 
10:00 A. M. Sunday School. 
11:00 A. M. Church Service. 

8:00 P. M. Christian Youth 

Fellowship. 

7:30 P. M. Evening Service. 



Colored Homemakera 

The Colored Homemakers Club 
met January 19th at the home of 
Mrs. Martha Jones on the Nichol- 
son Pike. A delicious covered dish 
luncheon was enjoyed by Mrs. 
Clint Riley, Mrs. Robert Sleet, 
Mrs. Jas. Riddell, Anna May 
Sleet. Mrs. Estill Sleet, Mrs. Joe 
Howlett, Mrs. Virgle Sechrest, 
Adeline , Sleet, Mrs. Birdie Blue, 
Katheryn Ingram, Mrs. Elmer 
Ross, Anna Pearl Ross, Mrs. W. 
W. RouseTMrs. Allen Gaines and 
the hostess, Mrs. Martha Jones. 

Mrs. W. W. Rouse gave an In- 
teresting reading after which Mrs. 
Allen Gaines gave the lesson, 
"Darning and Sewing" a very 
timely lesson which helped each 
one present. Roll call was answer- 
ed by telling our New Year's 
Resolution. 



BIG CASH SAVINGS 

OFFERED 

ALL POULTRY MEN 

FU1 1 L t S!. Cr £ ,lt if* *£Z and 8ave U P to 15 P« •■* Chicks will 

be bought early again this year, and we advise you to reserve 

your favorite shipping date so that you will not 

be disappointed. 

MONEY SAVED IS MONEY EARNED 

Good on any breeds shown on price list, but not good when less than 

100 chicks are ordered. 

NON-SEXED $10.50 
BLOOD-TESTED STOCK J/^jJ 



White Plymouth Rocks 
Barred Plymouth Rocks 
S. C. Rhode Island Reda 
R. C. White Wyandottes 
New Hampshire Reds 
S. C. White Leghorns 



IfitvSPmSSi ^PfL *° Prf-O-Pep Feed Store. 
512 Pike Street, Covington, Ky. (Send your own 
eneclc or money order for difference covering full 
amount of order. 



PRINT NAME AND ADDRESS 



PAY TO THE 
ORDER OF 



'I 



GOOD ON OR BE- 
FORE MARCH 1, 1944 

■00 Credit for each 100 
chicks ordered 



ADDRESS 



Fill in total 
number chicks 
ordered here 



FUL-O-PEP FEED STORE 
By Hugo Lang 



WE SELL DR. SALSBURVS POULTRY REMEDIES. POULTRY 
FEEDERS, WATER FOUNTS, ETC rUULIKY 

FUL-O-PEP FEED STORE 



512 PUKE STREET 

COVINGTON, 

KY. 



J4r Xj^j/i. 



HEMLOCK 9188 

Open Sunday* TIB 

Noon 



Mrs. Melvon Miller and son are 
visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Marion Gibson and daughter of 
Sherman. 

Mrs. Jane Points was operated 
on at Booth Hospital for appen- 
dicitis last week. We are glad to 
report she is getting along nicely. 

Pvt. Jim Woods and wife of Ft. 
Knox are spending a furlough 
with Mr. and Mrs. Ben Jump and 
family.. Mrs. Woods had her 
tonsils removed while here. 

Fletcher Butler of Covington 
spent Saturday night and Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Hobart Varner 
and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Kennedy 
and daughter of Beaver Lick 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
J. F. Kennedy and Mary Lucas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Lawrence 
entertained Sunday, Mrs. Lula 
Blackburn of Zion, Sgt. Francis 
Blackburn of Tampa, Fla. and 
Fearnot Blackburn of Louisville. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Gordon 

spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 

Henry Klosterman and Mrs. Elsie 

Gahagen of Norwood. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Rex and 



Mr* Jess Rex of La tonia spent 
Thursday with Mr. and Mrs. Her- 
man Cames. Dorothy Jane Points 
returned home with them to visit 
her mother in the hospital. 

Richard Bickers and friends of 
Cineinnati spent Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. Vernon Jump and 
daughter. '* 

Mr. and Mrs. R. s. Bingham 
and son spent Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. Ross Chapman of Con- 
cord. 

Several from here attended the 
Associational Sunday School 
Meeting at Vine Run. 

Mrs. Clifton Webster has a 
position with the Southern Rail- 
way in Cincinnati. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Anderson 
and family entertained Sunday in 
honor of their son, Harry Lee who 
will soon leave for the Navy. Mr. 
and Mrs. Herman Anderson and 
family and Evelyn Anderson of 
Covington, Percey Anderson of 
Knoxville, Tenn., Elnora Ander- 
son of Detroit, Mich., Mr. and 
Mrs. Earl Anderson and daughter 
and Mrs. Annie Anderson of this 
place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ferrell and 
son, Miss Gwyndolyn Ferrell and 
Juanita Kuhn of Covington spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Harve 
Ferrell and family. 

Mrs. Howard Carnes and Mary 
K. Gouge spent the past week 
with their sister arid brother, Pfc. 
and Mrs. Howard Blackburn of 
Augusta, Ga. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Gross and 
family visited Mr. and Mrs. 
Charlie Alexander of Napoleon 
Sunday. 

Mrs. Allen Vaughn spent Mon- 
day with her niece far Liberty; 'fiat 
Mr. and Mrs. Ravin Glass and 
family spent Sunday with her 
parents In Bourborn County. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Lambert 
and family visited Mr. and Mrs. 
Ed. Lambert at Zion Sunday. 



MTs. Virgil Alexander was taken 
to the hospital Thursday for 
treatment. We hope for her a 
speedy recovery. Others In the 
community who are sick are: 
Mrs. Milton Blackburn and Mrs. 
Martha Smith. 



INDEPE NDENC E BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

W. E. Manors, Paster 

Bible 8chool 10:00 •. m 

Morning Worship ll:©0 a. m 

B - T. U t: OT D . m. 

Evangelism Services .... 8:00 p. m. 
Prayer and Bible Study, 
Wednesday 8:00 p. m 



GLENCOE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. W. T. Dunaway, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m., Al- 
bert Collins, Supt. 

Morning worship at 11 a. m. 

Evening worship at 7:15 p. m. 

Prayer meeting on Thursday 
at 7:30 p. m. 



« FIRST 
I OF A 

C 



ov» 



use 666 

f*6 TABLETS. JALVL NOSE DROPS 




SERVICE FOR 25 YEARS! 

OUR REPUTATION IS YOUR PROTECTION 

R. Michels Welding 
Company 

722 Washington St. Covington COIonial 0670 




COLONIAL 

COAL & SUPPLY COMPANY 

47 DIXIE HIGHWAY E RLANGER. KX+ 

call DIXIE 7720 for 

Wayne Feeds — Red Jacket Coal 

Concrete Blocks — Ready Mixed Concrete 




COAL— THE WORLD'S MOST 
IMPORTANT SOURCE OF HEAT, 
LIGHT AND POWER . . . INDIS- 
PENSABLE TO MODERN IN- 
DUSTRY... r 

SUPPLIES 55% of U. S. Mechanical 
Energy 

POWERS 95% of U. S. Railroad 
Locomotives 

GENERATES 55% of U.S. Electrical 
Energy 

HEATS four out of seven homes 

vUAL — a basic and marvelous 
raw material for CHEMICALS. 
The genius and tireless research of 
industrial chemists, inspired by the 
rewards of Free Enterprise, have 
converted coal into . . . 

NYLON for parachutes . . .TOLUOL 
for TNT...NEOPRENE for syn- 
thetic rubber . . . SULFA drugs .'. . 
PLASTICS... SOLVENTS... 
ATRABINE for treatment of malaria 
. . . DYES . . . FOQD PRESERVA- 



TIVES . . . FERTILIZERS . . . INSECTI- 
CIDES. 

These by-products of coal, and 
many more, are indispensable in 
winning the war. 

When peace comes, endless train- 
loads of this vital mineral 
will again move from the great 
coal fields of Kentucky, Virginia, 
Tennessee and Alabama to make 
new products, new conveniences 
... a new world of progress in the 
Greater Industrial South of 
Tomorrow! 

• 

^^^ Preudcnt 

LOUISVILLE & NASHVILLE RAILROAD 

The Old Reliable 
Yesterday... 

Today... 

Tomorrow 



The L&N, also a product of private and 
Free Enterprise, has contributed mightily 
in developing southern coal fields, much 
to the betterment of the Nation, particu- 
larly the South. More than half of the 
L&N's traffic is coal, requiring 37,000 
coal cars costing 75 million dollars to 
transport. And these are but a part of 
the necessary facilities. 

The L&N maintains an organization of 
experts to assist in opening new coal 
fields, h» render advice on mining opera- 
tions and to aid both producer and con- 
sumer as to the proper selection and 
efficient use of coal. Inquiries of the 
general office of the L&N at Louisville, 
Ky., are Invited. 




WALTON ADVERTISER 



THURSDAY, FEB. 17th, 1944 



LETTER FROM NEW GUINEA 
(Continued from page one) 



appear to be lazy — until you dis- 
cover what they think is worth 
working for. 

Dealing with the natives calls 
for as much local knowledge as 
possible. This, a person has to 
pick up on Jfce spot, either by 
personal contacts • with them or 



through' white people who know 
them well. Even though the 
natives sometimes seem back- 
ward and dumb to us, they are 
often amused by our ignorance of 
the way* of the jungle and us not 
appreciating their customs. 

Settlements of the native is- 
landers are sometimes perched on 
piles out in the sea, or placed on 
offshore sandbanks. These are the 



I 



USED CARS-20 EAST FOURTH ST. 

Covington COlonial 3884 

1937 Ford Coach - $325 

1937 Studebaker Sedan J . $375 

1937 Dodge Coach * — $350 

1937 Studebaker Coupe $350 

1936 Lincoln Zephr ----- $295 

1936 Packard Seadn T $275 

1938 Willys Sedan 2 $325 

1939 Buick Club Coupe Z - $850 

1939 t HU(l«c«n Sedan $695 

1936 Cadillac I $325 

1936 Chevrolet Coupe — $275 

1936 Chevrolet Sedan _L_1 $245 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 



ATTENTION FARMERS! 

NEED SHELLS? 

WE ARE AUTHORIZED HEADQUARTERS 
FOR SHELLS FOR FARMERS & RANCHERS 
UNDER LIMITATION ORDER L-286. COME IN 
TO SEE US AND FILL-IN THE FORMS OR WE 
WILL MAIL THEM TO YOU. SHELLS READY 
FOR DELIVERY WITHIN TEN TO THIRTY 
DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF ORDER. 
We can furnish you with Shot Gun Shells, 22 
Calibre, 30-30 and 30-06 ammunition. 

NEW GUNS WITH SHELLS 

AVAILABLE UNDER ORDER NO. 003495 

The Cincinnati Athletic Goods Co. 

110 West Fourth St. CHerr y4768 

Just 42 Steps From Fourth and Race 

Cincinnati, Ohio 



PUBLIC SALE 

BEN BILZ is selling out. — Dudley Pike near 
Beacon Light , 

SAT., FEB. 19th -- AT 10 A.M. 

10 MILK COWS 

5 fresh, 4 with calf by side and 5 heavy with calf. 

9 hiefers, some coming fresh soon, 1 young bull, 

3 good work horses, 2 brood sows, 1 male hog. 

'50 chickens. 10 ducks. Set work harness. 

FARMING TOOLS — Mowing machine, John Deere. Hay rake, 
John Deere. Farm wagon, John Deere, with hay bed. 2 disc 
harrows, one 10 disc, one 12 disc, John Deere, 2 corn drills, one 
\ horse, one 2 horse. Manure spreader. One 60tooth section 
harrow, double tree and single trees. 1 drag harrow. Two 2- 
horse sleds, one 1 -horse sled. One 14 inch John Deere turning 
plow. One hillside plow. 1 double shovel plow. Three 7-shovel 
cultivators. 1 shovel plow. 20 tomato boxes. 10 dozen bushel 
baskets. 1 wheelbarrow. Axes and grubbing hoe. Forks, shovels 
and hoes. 1 cider press, 1 anvil, 1 potato digger, crosscut saws. 
Sledge hammer, crowbars. 1 bizzard silage cutter, four 10-gal. 
milk cans. Milk buckets, 1 Da-Lava Electric Separator. New 
hot bed sash and hot bed boards. Some household furniture. 
Truck, Chevrolet, %-ton, '33 model, panel job. Oliver turning 
plow. 

REL C. WAYMAN, Agent 



623 Washington St. Covington HE. 5107 

LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



Ind. 5066 




salt-water people, whose babies 
often learn to swim before they 
learn to walk.. Other native settle- 
ments are frequently hidden deep 
in the jungle. The mountain 
peoples usually place their villages 
on crags or ridges where guards 
can look over the country and the 
steep slopes can easily be defend- 
ed. Sometimes Villages are built 
up on bamboo stilks or living 
fences of the twisted aerial roots 
of banyan trees. Their huts are 
built so closely together that it 
looks like One large house. 

Most parts of the island is 
covered with dense rain forest — 
hot steamy jungle, with eerie 
green twilight. In drier places 
however, there are sometimes 
stretches of open grassland or 
savannah. This tropical grass, 
usually coarse and from 4 to 6 
feet high, in the distance looks 
like wheat. Natives often burn the 
grasslands as a method of hunt- 
ing wild game. 

The rain forest, with It's tall 
trees, occasional vivid flowers, 
tangled lianas, and interlocking 
maze of roots, may seem lifeless at 
times but it doesn't take a person 
long to find out that it's teeming 
with life. 

The islands, like Australia, have 
various kinds of marsupials, that 
is, pouched animals. There are 
several kinds of small kangaroos, 
none of them more than 3 feet 
high. The commonest ones are 
tree climbers. There are many 
types of bats, including the giant 
flying foxes, fruit-eaters with > a 
four foot wing spread. Rats are 
plentiful too, some over 2 feet 
long. 

The most striking creatures in 
this region are the birds. Their 
voices in the early morning sound 
like a regular jazz band. There are 



When In Covington 




at 

LANG'S CAFETERIA 

623-625 Madison Ave. 
Covington 




I 7 our 

Better have your eyes examined 
—they may be the cause of 
your feeling tired and irritable. 

Jos. B. Schnippering 

Optometrist and Optician 
(Formerly with F. Pleper) 

5 Pike Street, Covragto* 
Phone HElock 0700 



U. S. WAR DEPARTMENT 

CERTIFICATE OF 

AUTHORITY A G 095. 

EXPIRES AUG. 10, 1945. 



USEFUL 
NEEDS 

FOR 
SERVICE 

MEN 

Furlough Bags 
Kit Bags 

Roll Kits, Apron Kits 
Shoe Shine Kits 
Sewing Kits 
Money Belts 
Garrison Caps 
Overseas Caps 
Ties, Belts, Sweaters 
Chevrons, Collar Ensignia 
Shoulder Patches 
Service Ribbons 
Garrison Belts 



* EF-KO 
ARMY STORE 



508 Madison Avenue 



NEAR 

ran 



h Covington 



NEAR 
FIFTH 



hundreds of kinds ranging from 
the big black flightless cassowary, 
4 and 5 feet high, whose kick is 
as dangerous as a stallion's to the 
beautiful yellow and red plumed 
birds of Paradise. The feathers of 
the Paradise birds were* once the 
basis of a wealthy trade, until the 
government stopped the killing of 
them to save them from extinct- 
ion. Around sundown, flocks of 
noisy white cockatoos circle over 
roosting trees. There are dozens 
of kinds of parrots and pigeons. 
Here in New Guiena, lives the 
beautiful crowned pigeon, a 
smoky-gray bird as big as a small 
turkey and delicious to eat. The 
megapode* or brush turkey, also 
good eating, buries its eggs in 
large hillocks of earth. 

There are many varieties of 
snakes, including poisonous kinds. 
We are warned to be especially 
careful of sea snakes, usually 
banded yellow and black. In- 
cidently, I saw one a few weeks 
ago. it was about 6 feet long. 
Some of the lizards look ugly, but 
are harmless. 

Crocodiles of two kinds are fairly 
common. One is a small fresh- 
water type that lives well up the 
rivers. It is considered harmless 
by the natives. The other is a big 
brute that likes the brackish 
water of river mouths, and is 
leared by the natives. 

Most places are alive with ants, 
cockroaches, flies, mosquitoes, 
wasps, sand flies ,and other bugs. 
Scorpions and centipedes may get 
into our shoes at night so we 
usually lay them upside down at 
nights. 

Island foods are somewhat 
familiar to us, such as coconuts, 
sweet-potatoes, bananas, and 
pineapples. In place of our wheat 
and potatoes, most of the natives 
use taro and yams. Taro is the 
bulbous root of a kind of lily, and 
is usually a .light purple when 
cooked. The yam is like a . giant 
potatoe. Both of these may be 
eaten roasted or steamed. Sugar 
cane is widely grown arid in- 
cidently, New Guinea is the orig- 
inal home of this plant. Pigs and 
chickens can often be bought at 
the native villages. Pigs are 
particularly valuable to the 
natives as they are used in native 
feasts and ceremonies and- some- 
times in religious sacrifice*. 

Here's a few things that makes 
trouble with the natives: Inter- 
fering with native ^pmen; enter 
ing sacred places without per 
mission, and touching sacred 
things; molesting gardens, or- 
chards, and interfering with pigs; 
taking goods owned by natives 
with compensation; striking ox 
swearing at' natives; entering 
their homes out of curiosity; and 
making a lavish display of articles 
valued by natives. 

Well I guess you're either bored 
or asleep so will close. If you 
would like for me to write more, 
let me know and HI try to rake up 
something that I think would be 
interesting to tell. Lots of love to 
you and all the family. 

Your loving nephew, 
Walter Jr. 



UNION 



MT. ZION 



Miss, Ella Ferrell of Covington 
spent several days last week with 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. M. 
Ferrell. 

Mrs. Basha Hopkins of Coving- 
ton is spending this week with 
Mr. and Mrs. John Gordon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie » Lambert 
and family spent Sunday with 
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Lambert at 
Zion. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. G. C. Martin 
and daughter Lois attended the 
funeral of Mrs. Roger Martin 
Sunday. Mrs. Martin passed away 
at her home in Cynthiania Thurs- 
day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Lawrence and 
family and Mrs. Cora Green spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Ray 
Lawrence. 

G. A. Lawrence has moved to 
Georgetown. 

Pfc. Charles Lucas pf Camp 
Swift, Texas is spending a fur- 
lough with Mr. and Mrs. J. A. 
Kennedy and Mary Lucas. 

John arid Paul Lawrence and 
Glenn Anderson spent several 
days last week with their sisters 
in Covington. 

Mrs. Nannie Lambert is spend- 
ing this week with Mr. and Mrs. 
Leslie Lambert and family. 



FOR SALE 



HAVE TO SELL AS I AM MOV- 
ING TO A SMALL PLACE. 

l Grey Mare, will work any place, 

gentle. 
1 Jersey Cow, 7 years old. 
1 Heifer, 1 year old. 
1 Small Heifer? 
1 Brood Sow and 3 Gilts, all will 

farrow in March. 
Numerous articles. 

James Ramsey 

Located on McCullnm and Oliver 
Road, Independence, Ky. 



Mr. and Mrs. Harry Mitchell 
and son were in Warsaw last 
Wednesday. 

The W. M. S. of Union Baptist 
Church called on Rev. Oscar 
Huey and wife at their home on 
Lloyd Avenue, Florence, last Wed- 
nesday afternoon. Hymns were 
sung and refreshments were serv- 
ed following a brief but inspirat- 
ional talk by Rev. Huey on 'Know- 
ing One's Sell, Heart and Soul.' 
Through all his years of suffering 
Rev. Huey has remained a devout 
Christian and teaches all to be- 
lieve that Gods Will Be Done. His 
scores of friends and relatives are 
praying he will soon be given 
strenght to be out and about his 
Lords work again. 

Mrs. Elmer Noe entertained her 
bridge club last Thursday even- 
ing. 

Miss Nannie Burkett and Roy 
J. Burkett were calling on Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Mitchell last Monday 
evening. 

Mr. Omer Snow of Long Branch 
Road was visiting his nephew, W. 
S. Friend and family on Friday. 

Mrs. J. A. Huey was visiting re- 
latives in Cincinnati last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Meridith Sheets 
and daughter were visiting his 
mother, Mrs. Lucy Sheets last 
Sunday. 

Due to a belated visit of Old 
Man' Winter, our heavy sleet and 
snow oi last week-end made our 



world truly -beautiful, like some- 1 many friends and relatives, before 
thing out of a fairy land. Only ' returning to duties in the Marines. 
God can create such majestic 
beauty and this moisture will be 
welcomed by mother earth. 



^Delayed) 
W. C. (Tommy) Doane, Phm. 
Mate 1-c has been passing a few 
days of his 30 days leave from the 
South Pacific War Zone With his 
parents and sisters. He and his 
wife returned to Frankfort last 
Thursday but will return to 
Union for more visits with his 



CARD OF THANKS 



The family of Rollie Hume 
wishes to express their thanks 
and appreciation for the kindness 
and sympathy shown them by 
their friends and neighbors in 
their bereavement and also to 
Rev. DeMoisey and Chambers and 
Grubbs for the kind help in con- 
ducting the last rites and services. 



FLASHLIGHT BATTERIES 



IOC 



Each, Limit 4 to a Customer 



Coppin's Have set aside 2500 batteries for country folks, 
and will be glad to have the adjoining neighboring 
counties take advantage of this special we offer in 
flashlight batteries. Limit 4 to a customer. 

COPPIN'S 



Madison at 7th 



Covington, Ky. 



Boone County Farms 



12 acres, black top road, 18 miles 
from Covington. No buildings. 
Good land, good building site. 
$1000.00. Will finacne. 

174 acres, 20 miles from Coving- 
ton, l mile from black top road. 
A hill farm, all in blue grass 
and clover. 3 acres tobacco base. 
Large creek of never failing 
water. Old 5-room house in very 
bad repair, crib, no barn, 
cistern. On a creek road, one 
fourth mile can not be traveled 
by automobile without work 
being done on same. Will fur- 
nish 4-room house near farm 
rent free for twelve months. 
$4500.00. $2000.00 cash, balance 
$250.00 per year, 5% Interest. 
Come perpared to walk one 
fourth mile. Mile from electric. 
Very cheap if you can use one 
like this. . 

A. B. RENAKER 

Burlington, Ky., Phone 12 or 55 



a 



POULTRYMEN" 

Come in now to arrange for your 
STARTING MASH. Let us have 
your requirements. We will have 
your STARTING MASH ready for 
you when you need it. 



ACT AT ONCE. SEE US PROMPTLY 
DO YOU NEED COAL OR FENCE? 

We have just received a car load 
of regular field fence — 




Phone 154 - Walton, Ky. 



DO YOU WANT HEAVY MOTOR TRUCKING 
TO CONTINUE AFitR THE WAR? 



TO HELP the war effort, Kentucky 
suspended its law which limits to 18,000 
pounds the gross weight of trucks using the 
State highways. NOW, the trucking interests 
want the Legislature to pass a law permitting 
trucks, weighing 40,000 pounds, to use the 
principal State highways AFTER the war. 
These trucks, once admitted, could not be 
kept off the lightly constructed county roads. 

Under the present law when the war 
emergency ends, the 18,000-pound truck 
weight limit will again become effective. 
This law SHOULD NOT BE CHANGED 
NOW because: 

1. It does not interfere with die war 
effort, since trucks weighing 40,000 pounds 
will be allowed to operate during the war 
emergency. ^ 

2. Highways and bridges are being 
pounded to pieces. How can we tell now 
what condition they will be in after the war, 
or how much money will then be available 
to rebuild and maintain them? 

3. Trucking companies and oil firms are 
pocketing the added profits from these 
wartime concessions, for the rotes charged 
shippers and the price of gasoline have not 
been reduced. 

4. It is unfair to permit these interests 
to continue after the war to capitalize the 
sacrifices the public is making now. 



5. The bigger trucks mean higher cost 
of road maintenance and greater menace to 
the traveling public 

Why There Should Be A "Fair Field and No 
Favors" Batwsn Competing Carrier* 

1. The railroads in Kentucky pay each 
year more than #1,000,000 for maintenance 
of county roads, bridges and city streets. 
Total gasoline, license and weight taxes paid 
by common and contract carrier trucks are 
not more dun #650,000 in a normal year. 

2. For support of our schools the rail- 
roads pay in taxes more than #2,500,000 a 
year. Common carrier trucks are paying only 
about $15,000 in school taxes. 

3. Annual railroad property taxes in 
Kentucky are more than #5,000,000. Compare 
this with only about $35,000 property taxes 
paid by common carrier trucks. 

4. Kentucky is one of few states having 
no highway debt. Some states have nearly 
bankrupted themselves in a futile effort to 
maintain roads for oversize trucks. Nine 
Southern states owe $750,000,000 on road 
bonds. 

5. It was officially estimated in 1942 that 
Kentucky's needs for road reconstruction 
and relocation by 1950 would be $218,000,000 
if the State highways (about 17% of all 
roads in the State) are to be brought up to 
standards adequate for the heavy pucks. 



Iff You Are Opposed To the "Big Truck" Bill, Ask Your State Senator 
and Representative To Vote Against Any Such Legislation 



The Railroads Are Presenting This Matter To You Because Their Interest 
and That of the General Public Are Relatively the Same 



KENTUCKY RAILROAD ASSOCIATION 






n 



x 



THURSDAY, FEB. 17th, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



f 



ri'M*** — /it*»* < «/ia»» ■ w>in»«» «^»a»— ..«^ft>— .i^w ^ ^/wg 

SOCIAL -and 
I! PERSONAL 



We are -sorry to learn of the 
Illness of Mrs. Zella Walton, 
teacher in the Walton school. Mrs. 
Allen Oaines is teaching in her 
place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Barnett Noell and 
two children, Jo Ann and Donna 
of Covigton ■ were guests of Mr. 
Noell's mother, Mrs. Kate Noel 
and Mrs. Lulu Vest, Tuesday 
evening. 



Mrs. Maurice Stroud of Cov- 
ington, who had been visiting her 
husband in Boston, before he was 
transfered to New Jersey, return- 
ed to her home with Mrs. De- 
Jarnette. 

Cpl. Woodie Jones of Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire, United 
State Marine is home on a 15-day 
furlough. He is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. M. O. Jones of Concord. 



mm 



Courtesy and Co-operation 



m I* 



tBcreaainf ly valuable to 
re we depend. 



DIXIE STATE BANK 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 

Member ef Federal Deposit timsnnoe Oorporatftea. 



/\ 



DIXIE'S FINEST JEWELRY STORE 

FEATURING RELIABLE QUALITY 

AT ASSURED LOWEST PRICES 

itHQCBETTci 




<9/0 



'DIXIE HIGHWAY „t Gro.es 

ry ERLANGEH 

M A K A G E ^ : Ci b k E FLEMING 



Suburban jewelers exclusively 
tiiith modern stores in: 

MT. WASHINGTON • CHEVIOT 
NORWOOD* MAO ISONVILLE 





Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Johnson had 
as guests last week-end Seaman 
2nd Class James Johnson and 
Corporal Woodie Jones of U. 8. 
Marines. Sunday guests were: Mr. 
and Mrs.' Lawrence Wilson and 
daughter Mary, Miss Ooldie 
Robbins, Ruth and Ella Mae 
Dearing. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Vessels of 
Beaver Road entertained Mr. and 
Mrs. Mitchell and daughters of 
Newport over the week-end. 

We extend our best wishes to 
our two charming young ladies 
who have joined the Armed 
Forces. Though they ■ will be 
greatly missed we are proud of 
them. They are namely, Mrs. 
Mable Farrla and Miss Ella Mae 
Dearing. 

Mr. John Guth of North Wal- 
ton, who has been ill at home is 
able to be out and expects to re- 
turn to his work soon. - 

Miss Louise Conrad, teacher in 
Holmes Jr. High School, Coving- 
ton returned to her teaching 
Monday after being ill at home 
for ten days. 

Mrs. Jean R. DeJarnett of 
Boston, Mass. is visiting her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. O. P. Mann. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Faegan 
were Friday guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Clayton Percival. 

Miss Heeln Mann of Cincinnati 
spent the week-end with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clifford 
Mann and Ruth. 

Seaman 2nd Class James Albert 
Johnson, who spent a 15-day leave 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. 
C. Johnson of North Main. Street, 
returned to Great Lakes, niinios 
Wednesday. 



W. E. TAIT, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 

Specialising tax the 

correction and 

protection of 

EYESIGHT 



27 E. 7th St 

COVINGTON, KT. 

Hours 9:30 a. m. to 
5:30 p. m. 



Evenings by appointment 
Phone HE. 2088 




— that still sells at pre-war prices! 



Other wartime living costs have risen 
sharply, but electricity is one item in the 
household budget that is as cheap now as 
it was at the outbreak of war. 

During the past 15 years, regardless of the 
ups and downs of other prices, the cost of 
electricity has followed a steady downward 
trend. Though the average monthly bill has 
remained about the same, due to increased 
use of lights and appliances, the average 
customer of this company is getting about 
twice as much electricity for his money now 
as he did 15 years ago. 

Today, more than ever, electricity is your 
biggest bargain! 



COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE CO. 



INCO«rORATI» 



Keep on Backing the Attach — With War Bonds 



Miss Edelle McCoy of Dry 
Ridge was the guest of_ Mrs. J. R. 
OeJarnette, at the home of her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Perry Mann 
Tuesday night. On Wednesday- 
Miss McCoy and Mrs. DeJarnette 
were visiting with friends in Cin- 
cinnati. - * 

Mrs. Edward Napier of Erlang- 
er was the week-end guest of Mrs. 
Thelma Smith. 

Roberts Grocery Store has in- 
stalled a new "walk-in" ice box, 
which adds greatly to their store. 
They will be able to handle more 
meat and other things which re- 
quire to be kept cooler. 

Mrs. J .F. Jockey was called to 
Mississipi Monday on account of 
the death of her nephew, Pilot 
John Hannah, who was killed in 
an air plane crash. 

Mr. J. c. Gaines of Chattanooga 
Tenn., brother of Mrs. B. F. 
Bedinger of Richwood has been 
very ill in . the Physicians and 
Surgeons Hospital of that city. 
Mrs. Bedinger returned to her 
home Monday after spending 
several days with her brother, 
leaving him much improved and 
expecting him to be out soon. 

First Lieut. Harold Conrad 
spent Thursday, Friday and part 
of Saturday with his father and 
other relatives here. He is being 
transfered from Virginia to New 
Jersey. 



CONCORD 

"Exalt the Lord our God, and 
worship at His feet." 

Pfc. Wm. C. Glacken and wife 
announce the birth of a 7% lb. 
baby girl, February 8th, named 
Imogene Sue at St. Elizabeth 
Hospital. William has returned to 
his base at Hamilton Field, .Calif . 
after a furlough h^re with his 
wife and parents and other re- 
latives. 

Mr. D. R. Chapman is in with 
a cold, we missed him at church 
Sunday. 

Mr. M. O. Jones and wife have 
bought them a place in Walton. 
Their youngest son Clifford has 
gone in the service. Wood is home 
on a 15-day furlough. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Glacken 
and daughter of Mason, Ohio 
spent several days with Mr. and 
Mrs. W. A. Glacken. Kenneth left 
last Monday for San Diego, Calif., 
he is in the Marines. 

Rev. G. N. Smith was enter- 
tained in the Manfort Craft home 
over the week-end, he attended 
he B. T. U. social at Hobert 
Speagles Saturday night. Mrs. 
Smith didn't come as their daugh- 
ter-in-law was there sick. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Hughes 
were business visitors in Walton 
Saturday afternoon. 

Glen Martin was on the sick 
list last week, Dr. Marshall the 
attending physcian. 

The W. M. S. meeting was en- 
joyed by all present at the D. R. 
Chapman home Wednesday. Ten 
members and four visitors pre- 
sent. The all day meeting in 
March will be with Miss Ella 
Roberts. , 

We were all glad to see Harold 
Waugh at church Sunday, he goes 
back to service soon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Chapman 
are entertaining their grand- 
children from Louisville for a few 
weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Kannady 
spent Sunday with Harry Allphin 
and family, their son is home on 
a visit. 

We are glad to welcome our 
new neighbors, Mr. and Mrs 
Arnette and daughter. They 
bought the Geo. Lucas place. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Robinson 
spent Monday in Covington, Ky 
shopping and visited their daugh- 
ter in Ludlow. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kash Martin and 
children, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd 
Chapman and grandchildren and 
Pete Chapman all called on the 
new neighbors, Mr. Arnette and 
family Sunday evening. 

Sunday School each Sunday 
morning, a welcome is extended 
to everyone. 



little trucks would be hurt rather 
than helped by increasing the 
permitted weights. 

Incidentally, how much do the 
Chicking interests contribute to- 
ward maintenance of our present 
highway system? In a normal 
year the total gasoline, license 
and weight taxes add up to less 
tlianJfWaOOO, according to public 
records. In comparison, railroads 
in Kentucky pay over $1,000,000 
for roads, bridges and city streets. 

Trucking interests pay school 
taxes of about $15,000, while the 
railroads pay $2,500,000, the Ken- 
tucky Railroad Association says. 
Trucking property taxes total 
$35,000, against railroad property 
taxes of $5,000,000. 

Kentucky is one of a few states 
not burdened today with a high- 
way debt. Several states have 
nearly gone bankrupt in a futile 
effort to maintain roads for heavy 
trucks. It would be foolish and 
dangerous for Kentucky to make 
the same mistake. 



INDEPENDENCE R. R. 1 



PROTECT OUR HIGHWAYS 

We believe it would be a mis 
take for the Legislature now to 
change the Kentucky law which 
provides that after the war the 
18,000-pound weight limit on 
trucks using the State highways 
would again become effective. 

In order to help the wra effort, 
Kentucky suspended the law 
limiting to 18,000 pounds the 
gross weight of trucks using the 
highways. As a result, 40,000- 
pound trucks in use are seriously 
damaging the highways and 
bridges all over the State. 

In our opinion, such vehicles are 
too large for Kentucky roads, not 
only because they rapidly destroy 
the highways but also because 
they menance all other traffic. 

Trucking interests and oil com- 
panies now 'are richly profiting 
from use of the roads. In order to 
accommodate heavy truck traffic, 
the highways must be made wider 
and built more heavily.- , Why 
should the public foot the bill? 

It to get an increase in truck 
weights truck license fees' are in- 
creased, it will probably result in 
the little trucks paying most of 
the price for the increase. But the 



The many friends of Mr. Lee 
Faulkner are sorry to learn he is 
ill sit his home with typhoid, we 
wish him a speedily recovery. 

Quite a few people of this com- 
munity have the grip and some 
very severe colds. We have been 
having some real winter the past 
few days, and we sure feel it after 
the warm spring weather. 

Our Sunday School fell short 
of attendance Sunday morning. 

Mrs. Geo. Klein called on her 
daughter, Mrs. Chester Ballanger 
Wednesday evening. 

Mrs. Katheren Wharton of 
Dayton, Ohio is spending a few 
days with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. A. Keeney. 

Miss Wavelyn Riley spent the 
day Sunday with Miss Wanda 
Williams. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Rapp called 
on Mr. and Mrs. Emil Stein 
Wednesday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Stephens 
and children of Independence 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Attwood Hoffman. 



Have you a 
hidden talent? 



If you'd like to find- out 
what your special aptitude is 
and put it to work to help win 
this war-take the opportunity 
the WAC offers you! 

Join the WAC and let Army 
experts help you discover the 
type of work you can do best. 
Let the Army train you to do 
one of 239 vital jobs. Learn a 
skill that will be useful to you 
long after the war is over! (If 
you already have a skill the 
Army can use it too.) 

Get full details at your 
nearest U. S. Army Recruit-" 
ing Station (your local pom 
office will . give you the 
address). Or write: The Ad- 
jutant General, Room 4415, 
Munitions Building, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



NEW JAMES 
THEATRE 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 



SHOW EACH AND EVERT NITE 
AT 7:30 CENTRAL WAR TIME. 
SUNDAY MATINEE AT 2:30 
CENTRAL WAR TIME. BAR- 
GAIN NIGHTS MONDAY AND 
THURSDAY. 



AD childrea recmrdleaa of a«e 
mart have a ticket for each «how. 
No parking allowed west of side- 
walk tat front of Theatre or filling 
station adjoining. Police Orders. 



Betty Grable - Robert Young 
Adolphe Menjon 

SWEET ROSIE O'GRAZY 

FRL A SAT., FEB. 18-lfth 



Teresa Wright - Joseph Cotten 

SHADOW OF A DOUBT 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20th 



Roy Rogers tat 

KING OF THE COWBOYS 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21st 



Dona Massey - Patrio Knowles 

FRANKENSTEIN MEETS 
THE WOtF MAN 

TUES. A WED., FEB. 22-23rd 



Roy Rogers in 

SONG OF TEXAS 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24th 



J. L HAMILTON & SON 

FUNERAL SERVICE 



VERONA 



£y+A r -+**Jl/ " m +»*Jh " — *J b»-*»* J L* - w s/b. 



■'■»» 




KENTUCKY 



Mrs. Ora Ballanger of Dry 
Ridge called on friends here Sun- 
day afternoon. 

Mrs. Stallcup visited a couple 
of days the past week with her 
daughter and family of Newport, 
Ky. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Ballanger 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Dawson Ballanger. 

Mr., and Mrs. Roy Klein and 
family of Taylor Mill Road enter- 
tained for Mr. and Mrs. Lybrian 



Richardson and children Saturday 
evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lou Dueser spent 
the day Friday in the city. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Hanna en- 
tertained Mr. and Mrs. Will 
Gedkar for six o'clock dinner 
Saturday evening. 

Remember regular church ser- 
vices at Staffordsburg Sunday 
monring and evening. Rev. Rice 
will conduct the quarterly meet- 
ing at 11 a. m. 



JOS. B. DUNKIE 



ate. 



FEDERAL and STATE INCOME 
TAX SERVICE 

Goodwill Building 5th and Madison Ave. 

HEmlock 2176 — Covington, Ky. 




BRIGHT FUTURE FOR BUS RIDERS 



I'm do fortune teller, but I 
don't need a crystal ball to 
predict that a heap of guys 
In uniform will be takin' joy 
tides by bus when they get 
back in civvies. You're learn. 
In' from war travel how much 
more you see by bus,how lit- 



tle it costs to ride, and how 
Greyhound covers the coun- 
try just like a hair net covers 
a gal's permanent wave. 

We're crowded now, but 
are lookin' forward to makin' 
travelers happy again when 
you chaps mop up the Axis. 

Bdl-Ut&ii.u>L<kiue* 

PS. Don't forget— Buy an extra War Bond this month! 



SOUTHEASTERN 

> GREYHOUND 



PUBLIC SALE 

I am moving to the city as my two sons are going to 
the Army, and will sell to die high bidder on the 
Dr. Ray's farm, known as "Cedar" farm on Inde- 
pendence Rd., % mile W. of Independence, Ky., on 

SAL, FEB. 26 th 

10:30 A. M., (CWT) 

1 team of work horses; 1 Jersey cow, fresh by day 
of sale; 30 Tom Baron White Leghorn hens; 17 
ewes and lambs, one buck; 1 iron wheel wagon; 1 
hay rake; 1 mowing machine; 1 disc harrow; 1 
sled; 1 set of harness; 1 corn drill; 2 hillside plows; 
1 land plow; one 5-shovel plow; 1 laying off plow; 

1 jumper plow; 1 feed mixer; 1 corn sheller; two 
5-gal. water fountains; oil burner; 1 incubator, 450 
egg size; 6- ten gal. cans; hay forks; manure fork; 
two 2-man saws; two 1-man saws; 2 sledge ham- 
mers; hoes; picks; hog trough; chicken coops; 1 
brooder stove, oil burner; one 5-gal. churn; one 
5-gal. white- wash machine; 1 lard press; 1 white 
enamel gasoline range; 1 lawn bench and chairs; 

2 hand corn planters; 1 garden spray; 1 grass seed 
sower; strawberry crates and boxes; 1 coal cook 
stove; 1 heating stove, extra good ;1 day-bed; 2 
tables; chairs; 1 chest of drawers; kitchen cabinet; 
2 feather beds; 5 tons coal; and lots of other items 
too numerous to mention. 

TERMS--CASH 
LUNCH WILL BE SERVED ON GROUNDS 

ADOLPH APPEL, Owner 

Auctioneer — Harry Johnson, Phone Ind. 6196 
J. B. Doan, Clerk . 



I 



Hg^^ 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



THURSDAY, FEB. 17th, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 

(Established in 1914) 

THE KENTON-CAMPBELL COURIER — Established 1917 

(Consolidated June 1, 1938) 



Entered as Second Class Matter January 1, 1916 
at the Post Office at Walton, Kentucky. 



MRS. J. R. WALLACE and WILLIAM W. JARRELL 
EDITORS and PUBLISHERS 



Forelg-n Advertising ^-Bepresentothre: 

AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 




NATIONAL €DITORIAL_ 
ISS OCIATION 



Notices and Cards of Thanks: 
85 words and less, 50 cents. Over 
95 words $1.00. 



MEMBER 

jJfTUCKY PRESJ 
^ASSO CIATION , 



FOOD AND HOME NOTES 



February and March often prove 
to be difficult months for the 
homemaker to plan menus that 
are varied and interesting in 
appearance, and pleasing to the 




AH iMdln* brw* u a 
Approved. Blood tcited, I 



eiuchi 



~ tttrita chlckl < , 

three •«■■ old Prieee right. Also Stud chicki. 
FREE CATALOG, Write: KENTUCKY HATCHmT 
Ot IBIKKnilRUBi LUINGTOil. »«NTUcmT 



appetite. The housewife needs to 
spend more thought during the 
late winter in planning meals that 
are both nutritious and pleasing 
at the same time, according to 
Mary Hood Gillaspie, Home De- 
monstration Agent. Following are 
suggestions made by the U. S. 
Dept. of Agriculture, Washington. 
Give Good Egrgrs a Break 
Once eggs are in the kitchen, it 
is up to the cook to give a good 
egg a break — a chance to do its 
best for food flavor and value. A 
good egg offers tops among pro- 
teins for tissue building and re- 
pair, iron for red blood cells, phos- 
phorous and other minerals, good 



PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



Deposits Insured Under the Federal 
Deposit lusurence Corporation . . . 



Quality fat and three vitamin B's 
plus vitamins A and D in varying 
amounts, depending on what the 
hen a/as fed. 

Three home storage pointers 
should be followed: (1) Don't 
wash eggs until ready to use them, 
(2) Speed eggs to the refrigerator 
or other cold place without delay, 
and (3) Store eggs away from 
strong -smelling foods. 

At cooking time, keep in mind 
that an egg toughens at high and 
prolonged heat. 

While eggs are plentiful, home- 
makers can again turn their cook- 
ing talents to fluffy egg treats 
for the family sjteh as sponge 
cake, meringue, and souffles. The 
temperature of the egg affects the 
whipping of the white and separ- 
ation of white from yolk. A chilly 
egg just out of the refrigerator 
separates most easily because the 
white is firm and the yolk less 
likely to break, but the white 
whips best after the egg has 
warmed up to "room temperature." 
Whites should be whipped stiff 
but not dry, or until the white 
will hold up in a soft peak and 
looks glossy. Salt will help egg 
whites hold their stiffness A pinch 
of salt or cream of tartar added at 
the start of whipping will give the 
foam greater volume and stability. 
Even a small particle of fat on 
egg beater or egg yolk in the white 
will prevent it from, beating stiff. 
Quick Vegetable Soup 

Soup for six made with savory 
vegetables and half pound of beef, 
cook in just 40 minutes. What 
makes it quick is using ground 
beef instead of simmering meat 
slowly to make stock. Ingredients: 
one half pound ground beef; one 
tabelspoon fat; one half cup 
chopped onion; two teaspoons 
salt;, one fourth teaspoon pepper; 
one bay leaf; six cups water; one 
cup green beans (fresh or canned) 
one cup sliced carrots; two cups 
medium chopped cabbage; one 
half cup chopped celery and 
leaves; three and one half cups 
tomatoes. How to Make: Brown 
ground beef in fat. Add onion, 
cook 3 minutes. Add salt, pepper, 
bayleaf, celery and leaves, water, 
green beans (if fresh), carrots, 
cabbage. Cover, cook until vege- 
tables are tender. Add tomatoes 



and green beans if canned, the 
last 15 minutes of cooking. Mak- 
ing of this vegetable soup can be 
varied,' by substituting vegetables 
on hand. 

Molasses 
Old time cooks generally used 
more molasses in their cooking 
than is used today. Several old 
molasses favorites have been al- 
most forgotten. One is molasses 
sauce for hot puddings, which was 
made with molasses, lemon juice, 
salt and butter, and tasted some- 
thing like the more familiar 
butterscoch sauce. Another old- 
timer was molasses pie which had 
a cornstarch custard filling. 
Indian Pudding is a slow baked 
combination of cornmeal, molasses 
ginger and salt. Have you tried 
gingerbread waffles served with 
applesauce? 



Real Estate News 



Forest S. Thompson, Proprietor 
of The Mutual Realty Company, 
WilUamstown, Kentucky, reports 
the sale of the George Griffith 
farm located on Route 36 or 
Stewartsville Road and in the edge 
of WilUamstown, Ky. to Mr. and 
Mrs. Herman Kenney, Mt. Zion, 
Grant County, Kentucky. 

This farm contains 100 acres of 
highly improved land, having an 
ultra-modern Stone House and 
many other good improvements. 
It is a very popular farm for it 
has changed hands many times 
in the last few years at popular 
prices. Mr. and Mrs. Kenney is to 
be congratulated on obtaining 
such a nice home. 



WUatty<ui&uyl4JitU 

WAR BONDS 



V Mail 



CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Walton* Ky. 



Geo. 8. Caroland, Minister 
Church School .....10:00 a. m. 

Helen Ruth Gardiner, Supt. 
Worship, Lord's Supper 11:00 a. m. 
Evening Worship. 7:30 p. m. 



RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH 

M. A. Wlhnesherr, Pastor 

Sunday School, 10:00 a. m. 
Morning Worship, 11:00 a. m. 
Evening Worship, 7:00 p. m. 
Services every first and third 
Sundays. 




When a soldier or a sailor is low 
in spirits there is nothing that will 
cheer him up as much as a letter 
from home, so the War and Navy 
Departments have devised a meth- 
od for getting "the word" to its fight- 
ing men with the greatest dispatch. 
This is the microfilm method of 
transmitting letters, known to all of 
us as V-mail. 




tt 



There's a Fighting Fleet, too!" 



KGHT you are, Sailor! Fighting fleets are rol- 
ling on the Southern Railway these days! 

Fleets of freight trains... loaded with guns, jeeps, 
tanks, planes, and munitions of every sort ....with 
the raw materials to make more. . .withfood, clothes, 
coal and oil... with everything needed by a nation 
at war. • 

FleetT4>f passenger trains . . . carrying troops in solid • 
trainloads toward the war fronts. . .men and women 
in uniform, going back home on precious furlough 
trips... government officials and civilians traveling 
on essential war business. 

Yes, these are fighting fleets... fighting the vital 



home-front battle of- transportation. And winning 
it, too! 

Thanks to the loyal cooperation of our shippers 
and the friendly understanding of our patrons, the 
Southern's trains are playing an important part in 
speeding the day of Victory. 

When Peace comes, these same fleets of freight 
and passenger trains will "Serve the South" by 
hauling the rich commerce of 'a greater, °stronger 
Southland... more efficiently than ever before be- 
cause of the priceltag lessons we're learning today. 



Any news from home it bound to 
please our soldiers and our sailors 
but the news they want to have 
most it the news from our produc- 
tion front and news that we are win- 
ning our fight against inflation by 
our savings and investment in 

War BoBdt). r/ # $, Trtatury Dtfrmtnl 



UNION 



CHURCH 



M A 

Sunday School. 11:00 a. m., R 
W. T. 

Morning Worship, 13:00 N.. B. 
W. T. 

Evening Service, 8:80 p. t»„ 
E. W. T. 

Services every second and forth 
Sundays. 



NEW. BETHEL BAP. CHURCH 
Verona, Kentucky 



Rev. Shirley Spahr, Pastor 

Preaching services every 1st and 
3rd Sunday. 

Sunday School 10, a. m. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed 8 p. m. 

Evening Services ,.. 7:30 p. m. 

All times given Central War Time 
' h 

BIG TONE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Sam Hogan, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10:00 a. m., 
(CWT), Harry Rouse, Supt. 

Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m., 
(CWT). 

B. T. U. at 7:00 p. m., (CWT). 

Evening Worship at 7:45 p. m., 
(CWT). 

Services each Sunday. Tou are 
cordially invited to worship with 
us 



UPSET STOMACHS 
YIELD INCHES OF 
GAS AND BLOAT 



"I was so full of gas I was afraid 
I'd burst. Sour, bitter substance 
rose up in my throat from my 
upset stomach after meals. I got 
erb-help, and it worked inches 
of gas and bloat from me. Waist- 
line is way down now. Meals are a 
pleasure. I praise Erb-Help to the 
sky." — This is an actual signed 
testimonial from a man living 
right here in Walton. 

ERB-HELP is the new formula 
containing medicinal juices from 
12 Oreat Herbs; these herbs 
cleanse bowels, clear gas from 
stomach, act on sluggish liver and 
kidneys. Miserable people soon 
feel different all over. So don't go 
on suffering — Get Erb-Help. Jones 
Drug Store. 



President 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 




4 V Is For 
Vision 

Everybody has a part in the 
drive for VICTORY. Good eye- 
sight is of vital importance. Eye 
strain and defective vision keeps 
a person below normal, when it 
is his or her patriotic duty to feel 
as well and strong as possible. 

Come in today and have your 
eyes examined. 

FRANK RIGGS 

Optometrist 
Pike A Russell Covington, Ky. 



WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Walton. Ky. 



Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B,„T. U, 6:30 p^m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m, 

Prayer Meeting, Wed., 7:30 p. ra, 



WALTON METHODIST CHURCH 

Walton, Kentucky 



7 



Rev. C. G. Bearing, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Youth Fellowsihp 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Service 7:00 p. m. 



A PENNY POST CARD WILL 
SAVE YOU DOLLARS ON 



FIELD and 



I 
I 




DIXIE BRAND 

SEEDS 



NEW CROP NOW ON SALE 



Begin now planning for the biggest farm 
year in history with tried and proven 
Hill's Dixie Brand S eed s h igh In ger- 
mination and parit y b est all-around 
reunite assured. 



PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL 



CCORCC W. 



Sinrc IMS 

ILL 

AMD 

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SEEDSMEN SINCE 1863 



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28-St PIKE 



COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 







The future is 
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ff)dke the ' ! 

most of I 
rtwoV.iwig / 

a "d good / 
wa °es...$ave / . 
reoufarly f or / 

we later. I '' 

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION.; 
OF COVINGTON ' 

Ml MAIN STEER (Offlae Open Daily) — U&M 1MI ' > 






rom w 



here I 



sit. 



6y Joe Marsh 



That must've been a mighty 
interesting party they gave in 
Louisville, a while back, for 
the folks that are running the 
different rationing boards. 

It's a thankless job, natural- 
ly. Why a man might even have 
to turn down his best friends 
when they want a few extra 
points or something! 

But they've done a mighty 
fine job— fair and square— and 
our folks appreciate their un- 
selfish efforts to give everybody 
an even break. 

People seem to understand 
that fair rationing is all for the 
nation's best interests. 



It's a kind of Self-Regulation 
program Like the brewers— the 
wholesale and retail beer deal- 
ers—are carrying on. 

They are seeing that the laws 
of Kentucky governing the sale 
of malt beverages are enforced 
in the letter and the spirit- 
that retail outlets maintain 
high standards of operation. 

From where I sit that, too, is 
a far-sighted piece of work in 
the public interest. 



J^eOttvu£ 



• M44,lltEWMWWOUSTIIYrO«mDAT10M • KEimiCKf C0MMITTH 
■JURY R. FIANCE, Slats Director, 1523 KYBURN EN, LMMMUf 




Sal 



■a 



sspvbtHbwHBbm 



Thursday, February 17, 1944 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



ClASSIFiED 

DEPARTMENT 



CREMATION 



CREMATION 



a> WSQSfH, 



f r s s srvs Th« Rwnalna ol Your Laved Oims 

VISIT THE NEW HILLSIDE CHAPEL ' 

9:00 A.M. la 4.-00 P.M. 

Writs far Dneripnv* BoekUt 

CINCINNATI CREMATION CO. 



" When you hear a Marine called 
• "Leatherneck," it has nothing to 
do with the epidermis of his neck. 
Years ago the Marine uniform was 
equipped with a high stiff leather 
collar. From that time on, "Leath- 
erneck" has been the word for a 
Marine. The word for his favorite 
cigarette is "Camel"— the favorite 
cigarette also of men in the Army, 
Navy, and Coast Guard. (Based 
on actual sales records from serv- 
ice men's stores.) And though 
there are Post Office restrictions 
on packages to overseas Army 
men, you can still send Camels 
to soldiers in the U. S., and to men 
in the Navy, Marines, and Coast 
Guard wherever they are.— Adv. 



Jr-ii J yHAHOLDCHANNINGWIRE 

^© > ■ Vv-.N.U. RELEASE 





TERNS 



LEW BURNET hat returned from 
Wyoming to eouthern Texas in 1875, to 
take a Job aa trail boss tor TOM AR- 
NOLD, owner of the Crosi T. Tom telli 
Lew that he if moving his herd to Wyo- 
ming, and that he wants to stock Lew's 
ranch there. He offers Lew a share In 
partnership with STEVE and JOT AR- 
NOLD, his son and daughter. Lew re- 
fuses, because he does not wish to be 
associated with CLAY manning, Joy's 
nance. Lew agrees to take Tom's herd 
to the Indian -agent at Ogallala. Lew is 
aware of some undercurrent of treach- 
ery, possibly Involving Steve Arnold, 
Clay Manning, a new hand, ED 
BPLANN, and four men whom Lew met 
earlier. 



CHAPTER V 



St Joseph 

ASPIRIN 



. . - 36 TABLETS 20* 100 TABLETS 35« 

Worlds largest seller at io* 

Gigantic Grape Cluster 
A huge cluster of grapes weigh-. 
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GROVE'S 

COLD TABLETS 

Prompt, Decisive Relief 



Grove's Cold Tablets are a real medi- 
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cold. Take Grove's Cold Tablets ex- 
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Sort Monty— Get Lor it Economy Shu 



FOR FIFTY YEARS n 

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AS BROMO QUININE" 
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Deep Snow 

Sixty inches of snow fell in one 
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CHAFE 



Protect and ease abrased 
skin with Mexsana, the 
soothing, medicated pow- 
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AN N OYS itching, of irritated akin. 



Stars in Sig 
There are approximately 6,000 
stars visible to the human eye 



,Y0U WOMEN WHO SUFFER FM 

HOT FLASHE! 

If you suffer from hot flashes, 
weak, nervous, cranky feelings, are 
a bit blue at times— due to the 
functional "middle-age" period 
peculiar u> women— try Lydia E. 
Pinkham's Vegetable Compound 
to relieve such symptoms. Taken 
gularly — Pinkham's Compound 
!lps build up resistance against 
such distress. It helps naturel 
Also a fine stomachic tonic. Fol- 
low label directions. 

LYDIA E. PINKHAM'S ffi5Ko 



Relief At Last 
For Your Cough 



Creomulsion relieves promptly be» 
eause it goes right to the seat of the 
trouble to help loosen and expel 



germ laden phlegm, and aid nature 
to soothe' and heal raw, tender, in- 
flamed bronchial mucous mem- 
branes. Tell your druggist to sell yon 
• bottle of Creomulsion with the un- 
derstanding you must like the way it 
quickly allays the cough or you an 
to have your money back. 

CREOMULSION 

for Coughs, Chest Colds, Bronchitis 



—Buy War Savings Bonds— 



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Watch Your 



Help Them Cleanse the Blood 
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Tour kidneys are constantly filtering 
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Symptoms may bo nagging backache, 
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getting up nights, swelling, pufflness 
under the eyes — a feeling of nervous 



anxiety and loss of psp and strength. 

Other signs of kidney or bladder dis- 
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There should be no doubt that prompt 
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Doans Pills 



Clay Manning and Ed Splann 
followed the galloping animal in to 
the nearest fire, where Splann 
caught his forelegs In a loop and 
threw him expertly. This huge 
bearded fellow was a cow hand all 
right, Lew admitted. But there was 
something else. Watching, while the 
hot Cross T iron was run on the 
steer's shoulder, he felt again the 
strain of Clay Manning's unnatural 
silence, sitting his horse there close 
saying nothing. 

He turned his gaze up the valley 
and saw Tom Arnold coming from 
the creek-bottom trees and paused 
then with his eyes fixed upon the 
pole fences of the dipping chute, 
like two wide-open arms reaching 
out for an eighth of a mile. 

Then Clay Manning said idly, 
"What took you to the rims this 
morning?" 

"The view," he said, his eyes still 
•peculating on the dipping chutes. 
"Always did like it from up there." 
"That ail?" Clay's voice was 
roughly edged. "I'd like to know." 
"Clay," he said, "you've got noth- 
ing against me. You don't like my 
coming back to be trail boss for 
Tom, sure. But it's only because 
trailing has been my business these 
years. You'll still be Tom's foreman 
and segundo on this trip. If the 
Cross T ever gets north, Clay, we'll 
have to work together. That's ■ 
fact." 

He saw his plea have a strange 
effect in the blue eyes, troubling 
them with a hounded look. And it 
seemed to bring Clay out into the 
open for an instant. Bitterly he said, 
"Lew, there's more happened here 
than you know. I can't make any 
promises." He closed his mouth on 
that 

"All right," Lew accepted. 
"There's something I do know. From 
the rims I could see herds going 
north while we're not even ready. 
There's a faster way to do this 
branding if you want to try. Trick 
I saw worked last year." 
"How's that?" 

"Use the dipping chute. Roping's 
too slow. We could run this whole 
bunch through by dark tonight." 

Ed Splann had flipped his loop 
free from the branded steer and had 
turned toward them. He brought 
his horse to a stop close beside 
Clay's in time to hear this last talk. 
He leaned forward in his saddle. 
"What kind of schoolboy game is 
that? What's the matter, Burnet, 
can't you use a rope?" 

Lew looked at him , steadily, say- 
ing nothing. Somehow in this man 
he saw a trouble center on the Cross 
T. There was a surly sureness about 
him, more than the arrogance of 
brute strength. He wondered again 
why Clay would tolerate his sort in 
the crew. 

Then, as if made more bold and 
sure by that silence, Splann goaded, 
"Leave him try his schoolboy trick! 
Come on, Clay." 

Suddenly this early morning's 
calm decision to keep things run- 
ning without trouble was gone. He 
understood that he was being ribbed 
into a fight. It was what Splann 
wanted, a showdown. It might as 
well come now as later. 

He swung his horse to get Clay 
from between them. But in that 
same instant, incredibly fast, a gun 
was in the man's right fist There 
was no smokiness in his eyes now. 
They were only** cold, hard gray, 
unblinking. 

"Now you," he began, but Clay's 
quick warning cut him off. 

"Careful, Ed! Somebody's com- 
ing!" 

It was Tom Arnold pounding to- 
ward them, his horse flung forward 
in a rush that swept along a dust 
cloud when he stopped. "What the 
hell's going on here?" He glared at 
Splann's drawn • gun. With a hot 
violence unlike him in a crisis he 
blazed, "Clay, is this all you've got 
to do?" He swung his angry stare. 
"Lew, what's wrong?" 

"Little argument, Tom. Nothing 
much." 
"Well! What about?" 
"Difference of opinion mostly. 
Had an idea we could hurry up this 
branding by using your dipping 
chute. You build your fires along- 
side, push the animals through and 
run the hym on them as they pass. 
I've seen it work." 

Arnold considered it, the anger go- 
ing out of him. "Well, Clay," he 
asked, "what's the objection?" 
"Not my method, that's all." 
"Maybe not But if Lew's seen it 
work let's give it a try. Anything 
to make up time." 

Clay hesitated, Beside him, Splann 
moved bis horse closer. There was 
a little silence. Then Clay shook 
his head. "Tom, I'll tell you. If 
you want to switch foreman right 



now instead of on the trail that suits 
me." ■ ■. ,,. i - 

Tom Arnold spoke quietly. 
"There's no call for cussedhess, 
Clay, that I can see. But it's your 
choice. Lew, take the Job." He 
swung his back to them and rode 
off. 

Clay Manning turned in his sad- 
dle. Something had happened to 
him in that moment of giving up his 
leadership of the Cross T. There 
was a grimness added to him that 
had not been there before. 

Without temper he said, "Lew, 
I'm going north with this herd for a 
reason that you understand. But 
not as your segundo. Either you or 
I'll end up in full charge." 

Beside him, suddenly, Splann 
kicked their two horses forward. 
"Come on. Clay, come on!" 

Like any captain leading an army 
troop, a trail boss needed a lieuten- 
ant, his segundo. And since Clay 
had refused Lew hunted up one man 
in the Cross T that he could count 
on absolutely.. 

When Rebel John Quarternight'! 
white head appeared among those 
riders darting in and out of the dust 
cloud he rode over and waved him 
to a stop. 

"John," he said, "I've taken over 
the herd. We're going to push this 
branding along." 

. He explained his way and added, 
grinning with the strong affection 
that he had for this man, "No argu- 
ment now. I've heard it. I'll take 
no talk from a pullet like you!" . 

It was John Quarternight who had 
taught him all he knew about cattle, 
most of what he knew about men— 
a straight-backed, sturdy old war- 
rior, close to seventy now, with de- 



pen. If that comes to me before. 
W» rgflCB Ugallala vou Ionic In- Sis ' 




A quietness came over him and 
there was nothing that Lew wanted 
to say. 

ceivingly mild blue eyes and a 
drooping mustache turned yellow by 
the sun. His full life went into the 
past as far as the war for Texas 
independence, up through the Re- 
bellion and after that the Apache 
days. 

He chuckled. "No, got no argu- 
ment. I'm beginnin.' to think maybe 
we'd see Ogallala next Christmas! 
It's plain disgraceful pokin' irons at 
cows through a fence. But we'll 
give her a try." He swung his horse. 
"Build your fires, son. I'll tell the 
boys." 

Lew's wave brought Quarternight 
around to him. He yelled above the 
rattle of horns slashing at the fence 
logs and the bellowing din: "Takes 
two hands for this, John!" 

The old man stepped down be- 
side him and grabbed a hot iron, 
shaped like a cross, with another 
bar on top to make the T. They 
worked from opposite ends of the 
penned steers, meeting in the mid- 
dle. It was a choking Job. Cotton- 
wood made clouds of smoke. The 
rancid odor of singed hide filled the 
air. Over them a midday sun poured 
down a breathless heat 

But the longhorns were moving, 
bin by ten in endless parade., In 
half an hour's time Lew waved Joe 
Wheat and Ash Brownstone down to 
relieve himself and Quarternight 

Arnold jerked a nod at the work. 
He looked as if a heavy weight had 
been lifted from him. There was 
humor in him again. "Man's never 
too old," he said, "to learn a new 
wrinkle! You'll have this job done 
by dark." 1_ 



A quietness came over him and 
there "was nothing that Lew wanted 
to say. Then Arnold said strongly, 
"Well, no complaint! A man loves 
a woman, raises a family and builds 
a ranch — that about completes the 
account, I guess." He turned back 
and laid the book on top of others 
in a wooden box. "Only one more 
thing I'd like to see. There's a pa- 
per in this, signed and legal. I'm 
.storing the box in Joy's wagon. Not 
crowdiug fate any, but things hap- 



book 

. Time had come to set the guard, 
Night shadows had slid like a blan- 
ket off the high rimrock. Out be- 
yond the firelight four thousand long- 
horns made a black pool, watered 
and contented now, ready to bed 
down. 

Lew dropped his tin plate and cup 
into Owl-Head's wreck pan. He un- 
derstood well enough that trail cus- 
tom allowed a crew to draw for 
their turns at night riding. First 
watch from eight until eleven was 
always the best choice. No man 
wanted to break his sleep in the 
middle and so hated the second 
guard from eleven until two. From 
two until dawn was only a little 
better, the whole day being ahead 
then with these early-morning hours 
tacked on. 

But for his own reason this trip he 
had decided to set the watch de- 
liberately. He wanted Clay and 
Sujann and Steve in separate 
guards. 

He made a cigarette in brown 
corn shuck paper and stooped for a 
burning stick end. With the light up 
close he looked across at lank Joe 
Wheat "Joe," he said, "I'm picking 
you to lead the first watch." 

All of the faces ringed around the 
fire lifted toward him. There was 
a tight silence. Then Ed Splann, his 
huge shape sprawled off, half hid- 
den, growled out, "How about let- 
tin' us cut cards for turns, Mister 
Boss? Ain't that the usual caper? 
Cut for choice and choose our own 
watchmates, that's what." 

Then Lew said, "Well, Clay, we 
might as well understand something 
at the start. You've been a fore- 
man long enough to know what the 
job means. Plenty of times come 
along when you don't stop to explain 
your orders. I don't intend to. Like 
the way I'm setting this guard." He 
brought his eyes around the ring of 
faces and stopped on Splann's surly 
stare. "If anyone here can't take 
my say-so he'd better quit right 
now." 

He held that stare for a moment, 
saw its cold, hard steeliness and un- 
derstood what he saw. "All right," 
he said and turned again to Wheat. 
'Uoe, you'll take first guard with 
Clay and Neal Good. I'll take sec- 
ond; Steve, I want you to ride with 
me, you and John. That leaves the 
tag end for you, Ash, with Charley 
Storms and Ed Splann." 

Ash Brownstone, Quarternight and 
Joe Wheat were the old men of this 
crew, all of them dependable. Thus 
he had one trusted hand in each of 
the three guards. 

"I'm going in to the house, Lew," 
Steve said, and looked off some- 
where before he asked, "You rid- 
ing in?" 

Lew shook his head idly. "No, 
guess not." Yet he watched the 
quick turn of Steve's shoulders with 
a frowning interest. And afterward, 
when he heard his horse race off 
toward the creek woods, he said 
quietly to John Quarternight, 
"Wouldn't hurt to stand double 
guard for a little while. Let's ride." 

Mounted, he held to the darkness, 
keeping clear of the longhorns, and 
then drew to a halt off on the bar- 
ren, empty plain. He saw old Rebel 
John sitting up high in his saddle, 
smelling the wind for trouble, and 
said, "Wait." 

It wasn't long. Moving slowly, a 
horse circled out from the creek 
growth, shielded by the dark. Lat- 
er its hoofbeats struck up a faster 
pace, aiming for the short row of 
lights that was Ox Bow town, five 
miles away. 

Angry and bitter with this knowl- 
edge that Steve was making a 
sneak, Lew sat rigid, listening, until 
Quarternight said, "That boy never 
could cover his tracks!" 

"He's got no good -business in 
town, John — not now." 

Off in the east the first lonely gray 
of dawn was spreading upward from 
the plains. The black pool of four 
thousand longhorns had risen, held 
by the last guard of the night. 

As casually as that, as if this 
might be only a half day's drive to 
the railroad, the Cross T moved 
into its march of twelve hundred 
miles. 

It was the usual start, no better 
nor worse than he had expected. 
He watched backward over the re- 
peated melees, yet took no hand. 
Both men and beasts needed to get 
the fight out of their systems. 

After the noon meal Lew told Owl 
Head, "Keep on due north and you'll 
find a tank for your night camp. 
Raise a smoke to lead us in." 

He rode over to Joy's wagon seat 
She had on a white muslin dress 
and one of Steve's broad-brimmed 
hats. But the sun had burned her, 
and she looked tired and hot 

She smiled up at him and yet she 
couldn't hide what he knew. The 
wagon had no springs. Jolting along 
this rough ground, she was taking 
even mope punishment than a ma* 
in his saddle. 

"All right?" he asked. 

•Til get used to it," she said. 

Hour by hour through e breath- 
less afternoon the blunt arrowhead 
grazed forward, leaving a mile-wide 
swath of barren, dusty earth where 
it had passed. With the disputes for 
places settled the animals moved 
quietly now, and on either side the 
swing men closed up in little groups 
to ride and talk. 

(TO BE CONTINUED! 





/DO THIS $M^ 

limpid 
Has a Cold 



r 



Don't take needless chances 
with untried remedies. ReUeve 
miseries this home- 
proved, double-action 

.#* PENETRATES 

to upper breathing ' 
passages with medi- 
cinal vapors. 
STIMULATES 
\ chest and back sur- 
Vj. faces like a warm- 
*t0g ing poultice. 

Now to get all the benefits of 
this combined PENETRATINO- 
stimulating action as shown 
above, just rub throat, chest and 
back with Vicks VapoRub at bed- 
time. Then ... see how this fam- 
ily standby goes to work Instantly 
-2 ways at once— to relieve cough- 
ing spasms, ease muscular sore- 
ness or tightness— bring grand 
relief from distress! Its soothing 
medication invites restful, com- 
forting sleep— and often by morn- 
ing most of the mis- 
ery of the cold is' 
.gone. Try it tonight. 







8558 

3441 



Princess Panel. 
TF YOU want lines which tend 
* to slim a too-heavy figure, a 
Princess panel frock with well- 
fitted wide belt section, this frock 
will do the trick! 

• • • 

Pattern No. 8558 is in sizes 34, 38, 38, 
40, 42, 44, 46 and 48. Size 38, short 
sleeves, requires 3% yards 39-inch ma- 
terial, % yard contrast. 



The Right Dress! 

JNDEED, it is very much the 
right dress when any special 
occasion comes along and you 
want to look particularly nice. The 
midriff treatment gives it its fes- 
tive air! 

• • • 

Pattern No. 8554 is in 6, 8, 10, 12 and 14 
years. Size a takes 2','t yards 35-inch 
material. » 

Send your order to: 



SEWING CIRCLE PATTERN DEPT. 

530 South WeUs St Chicago 

Enclose 20 cents in coins for each 
pattern desired. 

Pattern No Size 

Name 

Address 



ASH MS 7 

ANffTUEf) information on various subjects | 



A quiz with answers offering ? 



The Questions 



1. Are the redwood trees of Cali- 
fornia the oldest in the world? 

2. What is the largest city in 
Canada? 

3. At the beginning of World 
War I, how many airplanes did 
our armed forces have? 

4. Who wrote: "He prayeth best 
who loveth best all things both 
great and small"? 

5. When a broom is carried atop 
a submarine, what does it mean? 

6. Was there such a person as 
the Wandering Jew? 



Old Eli Took Jenny's 
Ultimatum Pretty Hard 

Old Eli and his wife, Jenny, had 
enjoyed bickering for over 40 
years. But at last Jenny seemed to 
be really annoyed. For a week she 
had been harping about Eji drink- 
ing his coffee from his saucer. 
Finally, at supper one night she 
delivered her ultimatum. 

"Eli," she said with dignity, "ef 
you don't stop a-djinkin' your cof- 
fee out'n your saucer, I'm a-goin' 
t' leave you, that's all!" 

Old Eli's jaw dropped. He looked 
at her, then surveyed his saucer 
of coffee in sorrow. He pushed 
away the saucer and spoke with 
a note of longing in his voice. 
"Jenny," he said, "I'm a-goin' f 
miss you, gal." 



7. World War II produced a new 
name for a traitor to his country. 
It is what? 

8. The highest tide in the world 
is in the Bay of Fundy, Canada. 
It is how many feet high? 

9. The largest republic in South 
America is what? 

10. The frequency of sun spots is 
subject to what periodical cytle? 



The Answers 



1. The junipers of the Sierra 
Nevadas are still older. 

2. Montreal, 5Q square miles, 
with a population of 818,577. 

3. But 55, with 35 flying officers. 

4. Samuel Coleridge. 

5. When subs come in from a 
patrol they carry a broom to in- 
dicate a clean sweep of the area 
patrolled. 

6. No. He was a legendary per- 
son of the Middle ages. One story 
is that he insulted Christ as He 
bore His cross to Calvary, and 
Christ told him that he must re- 
main on earth until He should 
come again. 

7. Quisling. 

8. A height of 62 feet. 

9. Brazil, with a total area of 
3,275,510 square miles. 

10. An 11 year cycle, during 
which time they alternate, becom- 
ing visible in great numbers and 
disappearing entirely from the 
sun's disk for days at a time. 



Whistler's Painting Rejected 

Whistler's famous "Portrait of 
the Artist's Mother" was at first 
rejected for exhibit at the Royal 
Academy in England and re- 
mained unsold for 20 years there- 
after. 




Camera Houses Operator 

A camera so large the photogra- 
pher works inside is being used by 
laboratories of a telephone com- 
pany. 




Try SCOTT'S 

EMULSION 




Keep the Battle Rolling 
With War Bonds and Scrap 



Nose Mast Drain 

To R./;.v» Hood Colds MlsoWe* 

When head colds strike, help nose drain, 
clear the way for breathing comfort 
with Kondon'a Nasal Jelly. Kondon 




acts quickly to open clogged passages, sooths 
inflamed, irritated tissue, reduce swelling. Amss> 
ingly simple. At all druggists. Used for over 6S 



years. Satisfaction or money back is guaranteed. 
Ask your druggist for I0HD0ITS NASAL JELU toe' - 



! today. 



■flMMMMMM|Ug^wmw 



PACKED TO GO ROUND TNI 



RLD! 



e So that oar soldiers, sailors, and marines 
everywhere can get their Camels fresb— 
cool smoking and slow burning, the way they 
like 'em— Camels are packed to go round the 
world, to seal in that famous Camel flavor and 
mildness anywhere. The Camel pack keeps 
your Camels fresh, too— preserving for you 
die full flavor of Camel's costlier tobaccos. 






mia the Anny, Kay,, Maria* Carps, and Coast Guard, 
tie favorite cigarette is CaneL (Based oa i 






WALTON ADVERTISER 



BEAVER LICK 



Pfc. Charles .Howe Cleek of 
Camp Breckenridge spent the 
week-end with his folks here. 

William Huey Green, a member 
of the U. S. Army Air Force is 
enjoying a stay of fifteen days 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Green. 

Rev,. Shirley Spahr will conduct 
regular services at the Baptist 
Church, Sunday, February 20th at | 
3 p. m. 



Rev. and Mrs. O. M. Simmer- 
man of Maysville, Ky.. wereJiere 



on Tuesday and Friday of last 
week. On Tuesday Rev. Simmer- 
man conducted the funeral of 
Mrs. William Brown at Hughes 
Chapel, and on Friday that of 
Mrs. Charlie Sleet. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Webster have 
moved to J. W. Conley's farm. 
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Kite have 
moved to Mrs. J. E. McCabe's and 
Edward Hamilton to the Allen 
place. 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



Classified advertising rate — le 
per word — 25c minimum 
Cash, check or stamps should ac- 
company all orders. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

We have opened a new department of Better Grade 
Non-Rationed Shoes for Women and Girls. 



RADIO REPAIRS at reasonable 
rates. Colonial 1121. 589 Scott 
Street. tt-lf 



NOTICE— Pure Drinking Water 
Hauled anywhere — anytime 
Call Walton 423. Jas. E. Falls. 
tf-47 



FOR SALE— 24 laying pullets 
Lawrence Wilson, Walton, Ky. 
Route 2. lt-13* 



NO RATION STAMP NEEDED 



AT ANY TIME 




Shop and Save Here 



OXFORDS, PUMPS 

STRAPS and WEDGES 

Red, Green, Black and 

Brown. 

These shoes are stamp 

and money savers. 



Priced $337 to *4 M 

Pay a little more and get a whole lot more. 

QUALITY SAMPLE SHOES 

627 MADISON AVE., COVINGTON CO. 1430 

I OPEN SATURDAY EVENINGS l 



FARMS FOR SALE 



THURSDAY, FEB. 17th, 1944 



FOR SALE— Registered Aberdeen- 
Angus Bulls, one year old. If 
interested in the best see these. 
John E. Biehn, Falmouth, Ky., 
R. F. D. No/3, near Morgan. 
2t-13» 



FOR SALE— One 5 year old grey 
horse, well broke and 5 O. I. C. 
Gilts. Wash Readnour, South 
Main St., Walton, Ky. lt-13 



FOR SALE— Hay. Larry Ryan, 
Verona, Ky. 2t-13* 



FOR SALE: — Young Jersey cow 
and calf. Vernon Brewster, 
Beaver Lick, Ky. lt-13* 



200 acres on State Road. Large 
house, electric, big barn, 4% 
acres tobacco base, 18 acres 
Virgin Timber. 80% of land on 
this farm will raise fine tobacco. 
Price $85.00 per acre. 



106 acres on good county road. 
8-room house, 2 barns, $6500.00. 



65 acres. Large tobacco barn, 
$4500.00. 



Also some property in Town of 
Walton. 



Address — Confidential, Box 13, 
Walton, Ky., Phone Walton 166. 



FOR SALE— Improve your flock 
with our best blood tested R. O. 
P. approved cockerels, about 25 
of them left, price reduced to 
$3.00 each. Menefee Poultry 
Farm, Tele. Williamstown 4201, 
Crittenden, Ky. tfl3 



FOR SALE-^Jersey Heifer with 
four weks old ealf, Jersey Heifer 
will be fresh first of March, 
also one work horse, 13 years 
old, blind, will sell cheap. E. L. 
Webster, Walton R. 1, on Green 
Pike., Phone Ind. 6724. 2t-13* 



FOR SALE— 10 ton alfalfa hay, 
number one quality; 10 ton 
timothy hay; 500 bu. corn, hand 
picked; 174 acre farm, Mud 
Lick Creek, near Duck Head 
Filling Station, on Verona Rd., 
near Highway 42. Cheap if sold 
at once. House vacant. Elecrtic, 
cow barn and all improvements. 
Walter Pennington, Walton R. 
2, Ph. Walton 657. 2t-13* 



FOR SALE— Holstein male calf, 
18 months old. Scott Lancaster, 
Walton, Ky., Ph. 855. 3t-13 



FOR RENT— 2 -Room apartment- 
furnished. A. C. Johnson, 120 
N. Main St., Walton, Ky. lt-13 



FOR SALE— Large red cow, fresh 
with calf by side, also 2 colts, 
matched team, 1 and 2 years 
old. Ralph York, Morning View, 
Ky., Parkers Grove Rd. 2t-13* 



FOR RENT— 5 acres tobacco base. 
All or part, or would consider 
man to raise tobacco and work 
by the day. Live with owner if 
desired. O. J. Moore, Moffett 
Road, Ph. Ind. 6402. 2t-13* 



WANTED— Man with a team, to 
raise 2 acers of tobacco and 
2H acres of corn oh the shares. 
WW furnish fertilizer, if avail- 
able. Frank O. Davis, Beaver 
Lick, Ky. 2t-13* 




JUST HOW OLD 

One thing you should kndW^about any funeral 
directing firm is how much experience it has had . . . 
how old it is. We were founded 37 years ago, which 
means that we have behind us a great many years 
of practical experience. 

CHAMBERS & GRUBBS 

Funeral Directors Phone Walton 352 



WANTED— Man to raise 1.3 acres 
df tobacco at Nicholson, Ky. 
Mrs. Ida Stephens, Indepen- 
dence, Ky. lt-13* 



WANTED— Men for work by day, 
for Boone Lake Club. Apply 
Hiram English, perferable on 
Sunday, So. Walton, Dixie 
Highway. lt-13 



DEAD STOCK REMOVED FREE 

For Prompt Removal of Horses and Cows 

CALL VALLEY 0887 

WE PAY VHONE CHARGES 

Ky. Dead Animal Disposal Co. 



LOCKLAND 



OHIO 



ApCE PLACE TO 
LIVE 

86 acres only $3250; 6-room house, 
barn 44x36, 50 acres in blue grass 
pasture; 16 acres alfalfa, 15 acres 
for tobacco. Patriot school bus at 
door. This is know as Louis Baatz 
farm; % mile north of Route 156 
on Bryant's Creek Pike; 4 miles 
east of Florence, Ind. 

Write 

JOHN D. GOLAY 

6073 Montgomery Rd., Cincinnati, 
13, Ohio, or Phone Melrose 0360. 



GUITARS— $9.95 up; Roy Acuff 
and other books. Strings and 
accessories. Hanser Jewelry and 
Music, 515' -i Madison, Coving- 
ton, Ky. lt-c 



CASH FOR YOUR CAR— Bring 
in your car and the necessary 
papers and we will give you the 
cash. H. R. Baker Motors, 20 
East Fourth St., Covington, Ky. 
lt-13 



FOR SALE-One Holstein Bull 
Calf, 7 months old; 5 ton 
Alfalfa hay, 1st cutting $32.00 
ton, 2nd cutting $40.00 ton; one 
aged mule, $35.00 and one hog, 
weight 200 lbs. Mrs. Wilbert 
Utz, Butler, Ky., R. 1. 2tll* 



FOR SALE— Team mules, both 
good workers, also 50 bales of 
straw. Charles Gerhard, Walton 
and Nicholson Road. Phone 
Ind. 6740. 2t-13* 



FARMS 



FOR SALE — One fresh Jersey cow 
7 yrs. old; one fresh Guernsey 
cow 5 yrs. old; 1 John Deere 
Hillside plow, good as new; and 
one jumping cutter plow. James 
Coyle, Walton, Ky. 2t-13* 




FOR SALE— 1934 Chevrolet 2- 
Door Sedan, 4 pre-war tires in 
A-I condition. Priced right. 
Dallas Whitson, Verona, Ky. 
*-12* 



FOR RENT— 213 a. farm, 4^ acre 
tobacco base, little corn, all 
tomatoes, potatoes, beans and 
vegetables you want. Team and 
tools furnished, 5 cows to milk if 
wanted. See John Kalb, Inde- 
pendence, Ky., R. 1, Phone Ind. 
6488. 2t-12* 



FOR SALE — Good paying paper 
route in Walton, Ky. See 
Richard Collins, Walton, Ky. 
lt-ll* — tf 



FOR SALE OR RENT— 6-room 
cottage, garage and garden, also 
store building and lot in Verona, 
Ky., Price reasonable. A. C. 
Roberts, Verona, Ky. 3t-ll* 



FOR SALE— 75 acre farm; 3 fresh 
cows; 3 plows; yellow bloom 
sweet clover seed; alarm clock; 
mantle clock; electric iron; 
electric sweeper; Winchester 
rifle and shells; Lugor revolver; 
lawn mower and small rocker 
100 years old. B. F. Menefee, 
Williamstown, Ky. 2t-12* 



3 MILES SOUTH OF VERONA ON KY. HIGHWAY 16 



10:00 A*M., (Central War Time) 

LIVESTOCK 
16 Pure Bred Pole-Angus Heifers, bred to Registered Bull; 2 Pure 
Bred Pole- Angus Heifers; 1 Registered Pole-Angds Bull; 2 Pure Bred 
Pole- Angus Bull Calves; 4 Holstein Milk Cows, 2 with calves by side, 
1 was fresh Dec. 2Qth, 1 to freshen soon; 8 Jersey Milk Cows, 3 with 
calves by side, 2 to freshen this month, 3 milking; 2 Grade Heifers; 
37 Ewes, 6 years old with lambs; 2 Yearling Colts; 1 Twd Year Old 
Colt; 5 Shoats, 150 pounds each; also 10 Ton Baled Mixed Hay. 

FARM IMPLEMENTS 

1 Hillside Plow; 1 Three Shovel Plow; 1 Five Shovel Cultivator; 5 
Sheep Racks; 1 Grain Drill; Milk Cans and Buckets. 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE 

Victrola with 200 Records; Side Board; Couch; Living Room Suite; 
Metal Ironing Board; Goodwill Cook Stove; Bench Wringer; Bed 
Room Suite and many other articles too numerous to mention. 

TERMS— CASH 

LUNCH WILL BE SERVED BY VERONA P,T. A. 

WALTER D. VEST ft ill. 0. JONES 

HARRY JOHNSON and LUTE BRADFORD, AUCTIONEERS 

BENDOAN, Clerk 



80 ACRES— 14 miles out oil road, 
% mile to daily bus, nice 5- 
room house, 1 -floor, electric in 
yard, large summer kitchen, 
cellar, cistern and well, 2 
chicken houses, large barn, deep 
well, metal 'corn crib, large gar- 
den of 1 acre wired with chick- 
en wire, some fruit, tenant 
house, 2 rooms, 1%-acre tobacco 
base. Lonely elderly lady must 
sell. Price reduced to $5250. 
80 ACRES— 6 miles from Latonia, 
facing on 2 roads; good 5-room 
house and barn, electric in 
house, 2 chicken houses, 2 
orchards. This is a "good farm; 
owner not able to farm. Team, 
tools extra if wanted. We think 
it wprth, $100 per acre. No rea- 
sonable offer will be refused. 
59 ACRES— East of Devon; 6- 
room house, electric in house 
and all buildings, large barn, 2 
chicken houses, double corn 
crib, cistern, well, springs and 
creek, 9 acres of alfalfa, 8 acers 
wheat, young team, 5 cows; farm 
tools if wanted. Price is $5900. 
80 ACRES— Nicholson; a real 
dairy farm*, lays good, good 
buildings, 10 cows, young team; 
tools if wanted. Price $100 per 
acre. 
80 ACRES— 25 miles out; 5-room 
house, electric, large barn, 30 
acres oflatfajfa, six cows. Price 
$4600. 
51 ACRES — 4-room, electric, large 

barn; on good road; $2700. 
44 ACRES— 12 miles out; 3-room 
house, electric, large barn, good 
outbuildings, limestone land; 
some alfalfa; $3500. 
17 ACRES— LLL Highway; 8- 
room house and outbuildings; 
$6000. 
71 ACRES— Good section; modern 
home, large barn, fenced woven 
wire; $10,500. 
61 ACRES — 4-room cottage, elec- 
tric, large barn, tenant house; 
$5500. 
125 ACRES— 3 acres tobacco base; 
good buildings, electric; $6800. 
97 ACRES— State road, buildings, 
most level land; $10,000. 
54 ACRES — Level,. some woods; 
new English shingle bungalow; 
$8000. 
CAMPBELL COUNTY— 39 acres, 
near Silver Grove; nice 5-room 
home, large barn and outbuild- 
ings, electric; $6800. 
80 ACRES— Most tractor land, 

good buildings; $7000. 
20 ACRES— 5 miles out; 6-room 

house, electric; $2000. 
19 ACRES— Large 2-family house, 
large barns; $4500. 



FOR SALE— 112 Acre Farm. All 
good land with 5.8 tobacco base. 
25 miles south of. Covington. 6 
room house with electric. Large 
tobacco and stock barn. Chicken 
house, garage, etc. $12,000. For 
quick sale. Mrs. John Myers, 
Verona, Ky. 4t-10* 



20 YEARS in radio servicing. W. 
M. STEPHENSON, Radio spec- 
ialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Coving- 
ton. COlonial 1121. tf-JO 



FOR SALE— Team mare mules, 
both good workers and single 
liners. W. D. Johnson, Walton, 
Ky., R. l, on Green Rd., Phone 
Ind. 6721. 4t-12* 



FOR SALE— 9 months old Pure- 
bred Roan Shorthorn Bull. R. 
H. Shinkle, Route 25, 3% miles 
South of Walton. 2t-12* 



3 3 



EYE STRAIN 

Are you conscious of a 
strain when you read fine 
prink* 

Perhaps you need glassea. 
| Consult us today. 

L J. METZGER 

Optometrist OptlcUa 

S3 1 Madison Avi 

Oovlngtoa 

Serving Northers Kentucky 
With Comfortehlo Eyeslrht 



WASHERS REPAIRED— Author- 
ized Maytag Service, Maytag 
Oil. Wm. Hagedorn, 856 Dixie 
Highway, Erlanger, Ky. tf-49 

FOR SALE— One 9 year old horse, 
9 shoats, 1 Jersey cow and about 
40 bales of mixed hay. E. B. 
McClure, Verona, Ky., just off 
Highway 16, on Bracht Road. 
3t-ll* 



MARCH 15th 

.... is the Last Day for filing your 1943 

INCOME TAX RETURN 

Avoid the Last Minute Rush! 

FOR PROMPT AND EFFECTIVE COMPLIANCE WITH THE 
( NEW TAX LAW, CONSULT 

ISRAEL ARON 

TAX CONSULANT— ACCOUNTANT AND AUDITOR 

Phone Hlland 2718 or REdwood 2200 
EAST SEVENTH ST. COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



Open daily form 9 A. M. to 9 P. M. 



r 






FOR SALE— Chicks, eggs from 
high-producing, tested Reds. 
Don't delay, order early. Simplex 
brooders, Salsbury remedies. 
Grant Maddox, Florence, Ky., 
Phone 384. 15t-9* 



WANTED TO BUY— Used fur- 
n